This is page numbers 211 - 238 of the Hansard for the 12th Assembly, 6th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was information.

Topics

Members Present

Mr. Allooloo, Mr. Antoine, Hon. Silas Arngna'naaq, Mr. Arvaluk, Mr. Ballantyne, Hon. Nellie Cournoyea, Mr. Dent, Mr. Gargan, Hon. Stephen Kakfwi, Mr. Koe, Mr. Lewis, Hon. Jeannie Marie-Jewell, Hon. Rebecca Mike, Hon. Don Morin, Hon. Richard Nerysoo, Mr. Ningark, Mr. Patterson, Hon. John Todd, Mr. Whitford, Mr. Zoe

---Prayer

Item 1: Prayer
Item 1: Prayer

Page 211

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Thank you. Good afternoon. Item 2, Ministers' statements. The honourable Member for Kivallivik, Mr. Arngna'naaq.

Minister's Statement 20-12(6): European Fur Import Regulation
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

Thank you, Madam Speaker. Madam Speaker, in May, before I became the Minister of Renewable Resources, I had the privilege of leading one of two delegations to meet with European governments. We discussed the harvesting of furs and animals, which is an important part of our northern economy and the foundation for our northern cultures.

The European community still intends to establish a regulation which could result in the end of the wild fur trade. Our primary mission in Europe was to gain support for Canada's request to delay the implementation of this regulation for one year.

I am pleased to report that our mission was successful. However, the one-year delay does not provide enough time for us to meet the conditions of the regulation as they now exist. We must now focus on two tasks.

First, we must change the European regulation so that it meets its original objective of promoting humane harvesting without killing the wild fur industry. To accomplish this, we must work with the Canadian government and our Canadian embassies in Europe. As well, the Department of Renewable Resources will monitor activities in the European Parliament. I also believe we must take every opportunity to meet directly with European governments and provide as much information as possible. In this way, European governments can make decisions that will help our economy, not hinder it.

Our other task is to continue the progress we have made in leading the world in developing and adopting humane harvesting methods. To accomplish this, the Department of Renewable Resources is continuing to work with trappers on using humane trapping methods. Both the trap exchange program and trapper training workshops will continue. As well, the department is participating in the process to develop international standards for humane trapping methods. Such standards are needed to implement the European regulation.

In our draft NWT Fur Strategy, we refer to the need to investigate alternative markets for our high quality wild fur pelts and products. We will proceed on this initiative in consultation with the Department of Economic Development and Tourism.

Lastly, I would like to thank the delegation Members: the Honourable Stephen Kakfwi; the MLA for Nahendeh, Mr. Jim Antoine; the MLA for Yellowknife South, Mr. Tony Whitford; Chief James Ross and sub-Chief Joe Charlie from Fort McPherson; Mr. Sandy Tongola from Rankin Inlet; and, the deputy minister and assistant deputy minister of Renewable Resources, Mr. Joe Handley and Mr. Bob McLeod. I also appreciate the support from the Legislative Assembly, the Department of Economic Development and Tourism and the Gwich'in Tribal Council in sharing the delegations' costs. Qujannamiik.

Minister's Statement 20-12(6): European Fur Import Regulation
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Thank you. Item 2, Ministers' statements. The honourable Member for Baffin Central, Ms. Mike.

Minister's Statement 20-12(6): European Fur Import Regulation
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Madam Speaker. This is a return...Oh, I'm sorry, I'm in the wrong place.

Minister's Statement 20-12(6): European Fur Import Regulation
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Item 2, Ministers' statements. The honourable Member for Mackenzie Delta, Mr. Nerysoo.

Minister's Statement 21-12(6): Minister Absent From The House
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Madam Speaker. I wish to advise Members that the Honourable John Pollard will be absent from the House for the remainder of the week to attend a federal/provincial/territorial meeting of Finance Ministers in Toronto to discuss the replacement of the goods and services tax. Mr. Pollard will also be meeting with Members of Parliament of the NWT to discuss the health billings dispute and the formula financing negotiations. Thank you, Madam Speaker.

Minister's Statement 21-12(6): Minister Absent From The House
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

Page 211

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Thank you. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Item 3, Members' statements. The honourable Member for Iqaluit, Mr. Patterson.

Sivullik Building In Iqaluit
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 211

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Madam Speaker. I rise today with more good news from Iqaluit.

---Applause Thank you. A striking new building, the Sivullik Building, now graces the downtown skyline of my constituency. Madam Speaker, it is a new building featuring 24 apartments, including penthouse apartments with spectacular lofts on the third floor and about 7,000 square feet of ground-floor commercial space.

What is exciting about this brand new edifice, Madam Speaker, is that it is majority-owned by 15 Inuit shareholders from all over Baffin Island who have put up real money, their own money, without government grants or subsidies of any kind, for 51 per cent equity along with Grinnel Properties Ltd. in this modern, $4 million building.

Their new company is called Sivullik Development Corporation. I'm told that the name "Sivullik" is derived from an ancient Inuit legend. Time does not permit me to relate it here, but briefly, Ninguraaluk, an old woman, Utuqqalualuk, an old man, and Iliarjugaarjuk, a little orphan boy, are transformed respectively into the stars Vega, Arcturus and Muphrid. Amongst the Inuit, Vega is known as Kingullialuk, "the big one behind," while Arcturus and its companion star are together called Sivullik, "the two in front."

Madam Speaker, I'm delighted that this project, which was the major capital project this summer, is entirely funded from the private sector, including financing from the Bank of Montreal. Iqaluit is coming of age in reducing its dependence on government.

---Applause

I'm especially pleased that this is yet another Inuit-owned and controlled venture; a second major real estate venture, following the Ivavik apartment building put up by Katujjijiit Development Corporation several years ago. I wish to particularly congratulate Harry Flaherty, president of Sivullik Development Corporation; Carmen Levi, vice-president; and, their board and shareholders for this major step towards becoming landlords in their own land.

It looks like, Madam Speaker, because of all the applause, that I'm going to have to request consent to conclude my statement.

---Laughter

Sivullik Building In Iqaluit
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 212

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

The honourable Member is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his Member's statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mr. Patterson.

Sivullik Building In Iqaluit
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 212

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you very much. I'm also very pleased to announce, Madam Speaker, that today it has been announced that the ground floor of this new building will be occupied by a new corporate constituent to Iqaluit, the Bank of Montreal, who will be opening their new Iqaluit branch this spring. Canada Post Corporation, which is relocating to enlarge their space, is going to move in to this new building at the end of March. They will be adding modern counters, more space and additional post office boxes to meet Iqaluit's growing population.

Both the Bank of Montreal and the new location for the new post office are well-situated in the commercial centre of the community, a handy walking distance from the downtown and residential core of Iqaluit. I wish to congratulate and thank the Bank of Montreal and Canada Post Corporation and their northern services division for placing their confidence in Iqaluit and its future, and for placing their valued business with the Inuit owners of this splendid, modern, new building in our dynamic community.

I believe it augurs well for our future that these important corporate constituents have chosen to do business with a new, northern-owned, Baffin-owned, forward-looking company. Congratulations to all. Qujannamiik.

---Applause

Sivullik Building In Iqaluit
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 212

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Thank you. Item 3, Members' statements. The honourable Member for Yellowknife South, Mr. Whitford.

Recycling In The North
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 212

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Madam Speaker. Madam Speaker, a few years ago I lobbied the then Minister of Finance, Mr. Butters, and other Members to put a deposit on whiskey, wine and other bottles in the Northwest Territories to encourage recycling; to encourage collection of these items after the contents had been used up, rather than leaving them lying around everywhere in dumps, on the streets and so on.

To my understanding, the program has been quite successful. There is a deposit at purchase that the purchaser can collect once they take the bottles to a recycling depot. They can have 25 or so cents returned to them for each of the containers that they had with them.

Madam Speaker, I think you are well aware that anywhere you travel in the north today, you are going to find tin cans all over. One of the leading items sold in the Northwest Territories is either beer or pop. Although the beer cans are recyclable -- they are made of aluminum -- there is no deposit requirement for pop cans. They are all over the place by the thousands. If there were a deposit on that can, it would be picked up and put into collection areas. People could make a business out of it and have this return. Right now, there is a market for them in southern Canada. People I know pick up these empty pop containers and take them to Edmonton and sell them for 20 cents or 30 cents a piece. Tin cans are the same. They just have to flatten them and they are sold.

I would like to see something like that happen here in the north, Madam Speaker, so it would encourage people who consume beverages from aluminum cans to keep them and return them to a depot where they can be collected and sent out for recycling. At the present time, there is no incentive to do this. If we were to put a deposit on them, it might encourage people to recycle a bit more. Thank you, Madam Speaker.

Recycling In The North
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 212

The Speaker Jeannie Marie-Jewell

Thank you. Item 3, Members' statements. The honourable Member for Deh Cho, Mr. Gargan.