This is page numbers 1279 - 1309 of the Hansard for the 12th Assembly, 7th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was education.

Topics

Members Present

Mr. Allooloo, Mr. Antoine, Hon. Silas Arngna'naaq, Mr. Ballantyne, Hon. Nellie Cournoyea, Mr. Dent, Hon. Samuel Gargan, Hon. Stephen Kakfwi, Mr. Koe, Mr. Lewis, Mrs. Marie-Jewell, Ms. Mike, Hon. Don Morin, Hon. Richard Nerysoo, Hon. Kelvin Ng, Mr. Ningark, Mr. Patterson, Hon. John Pollard, Mr. Pudlat, Mr. Pudluk, Mrs. Thompson, Hon. John Todd, Mr. Whitford, Mr. Zoe

---Prayer

Item 1: Prayer
Item 1: Prayer

Page 1279

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Koe. Good afternoon. I wish to inform the House that I have received the following message from Her Honour, the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories:

Dear Mr. Speaker: I wish to advise that I recommend to the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories the passage of Bill 34, Supplementary Appropriation Act, No. 1, 1995-96, during the Seventh Session of the 12th Legislative Assembly." It was signed by Helen Maksagak, Commissioner.

---Applause

Orders of the day, Item 1, Ministers' statements. Point of privilege, Ms. Mike.

Point Of Privilege

Item 1: Prayer
Item 1: Prayer

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Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I will try and do this in monotone. Mr. Speaker, I have a point of privilege pursuant to Rule 20(1), and, with your permission, I would like to rise on a point of privilege to clarify a matter that was reported on the 7:30 a.m. newscast on CBC Mackenzie.

Mr. Speaker, during question period yesterday, I was raising questions to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment concerning the Minister's responses to the recommendations of the Nunavut leaders summit on education issues. In the heat of the questions and the Minister's answers, I tried to raise a point of order concerning the Minister referring to the report of the Nunavut Implementation Commission.

My point of privilege is the manner in which the CBC reported the events. The news report indicated that I, and I quote: "Baffin Central MLA, Rebecca Mike, had to be told to calm down in the Legislative Assembly yesterday." It also went on to indicate, and I further quote: "She interrupted Nerysoo twice, the first time pointing, raising her voice and hitting her desk until the Speaker told her to sit down."

Mr. Speaker, CBC is radio, not television, and if television had been the reporting media, it would have shown that I did not hit my desk; and you, Mr. Speaker, did not tell me to sit down. Mr. Speaker, you were here and know that the facts were not reported correctly. Once again, the CBC has failed to report accurately the proceedings of this Assembly.

Mr. Speaker, I wanted to advise the House of this issue and trust that CBC in the future will make every effort to report accurate proceedings and comments and not sensationalize issues.

Thank you.

Item 1: Prayer
Item 1: Prayer

Page 1279

An Hon. Member

Hear! Hear!

---Applause

Item 1: Prayer
Item 1: Prayer

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Ms. Mike. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Mr. Morin.

Minister's Statement 90-12(7): Norman Wells Fire
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

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Don Morin Tu Nedhe

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am pleased to advise Members today that the Norman Wells fire continues to be held and the fire guards are well secured. As I told you yesterday, crews have been back burning at Vermilion Creek for the past several days. That task is now generally completed, and the wildfire and back burns have met in some spots. With the changing weather conditions, it is difficult to predict when the fire might be out.

Mr. Speaker, the community leaders and crews who have worked on the fires deserve a lot of credit. I am especially pleased that we have managed both the Fort Norman and Norman Wells fire situations with the crews and equipment we already have on contract. As I have said before, these are largely our own people and resources. So far, we have done the job without bringing in a lot of southern equipment and experts.

I am optimistic that I can continue to bring good news on these fires but stress that the entire western Arctic is extremely hot, with very little rain predicted.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 90-12(7): Norman Wells Fire
Item 2: Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Patterson.

Third Reading Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today, as a result of a motion limiting debate, Bill C-68 will be given third reading in the House of Commons. Two amendments have been introduced by our MP, Jack Anawak, who says he will vote in favour of the bill, and by Minister of Justice, Allan Rock.

One amendment made by Mr. Rock will exempt Inuit subsistence hunters from the borrowing or lending provisions of the bill. Although it goes a little way towards recognizing the way northern people hunt, often as a collective enterprise, this amendment still leaves us with many problems.

First of all, it is only subsistence hunters who will not be charged for borrowing or lending a firearm. To date, subsistence hunting has been very narrowly defined by the courts and by officials. Many of our aboriginal constituents are active hunters but they are not classified as subsistence hunters because they have jobs where they earn more than $30,000 a year.

Secondly, another class of northern hunters, non-native hunters, many of whom live with and hunt with aboriginal people, are completely left out of this amendment.

The end result of this amendment is that it will create three classes of hunters in the NWT: aboriginal subsistence hunters who will be lucky enough not to be charged for borrowing or lending firearms, although they still will not be exempt from registering their guns; and, aboriginal hunters who have jobs, who, along with non-native hunters, will be charged for loaning or borrowing firearms without permits and permission. Three classes of hunters, two sets of rules.

A more serious problem is that even if a hunter is lucky enough to be in the narrow class of people who will be exempt from the rules for borrowing or lending, no aboriginal hunter will be exempt from the requirement to register rifles and have a permit to buy a rifle. My constituents consider these compulsory registration provisions to be a major infringement on their ability to hunt and pursue a life on the land. For families who own a lot of firearms for the various seasons and species they hunt, compulsory registration will be a major hassle. It is misleading to pretend that it will not be a major inconvenience and interference with the traditional outdoor lifestyle and the ability to purchase and sell firearms as tools used in pursuit of the renewable resources economy. This amendment does nothing about compulsory registration and the huge amounts of money which will have to be spent so wastefully in the north trying to make an unworkable system work.

The other amendment made by Mr. Anawak adds a new clause stating that Bill C-68 does not take away from aboriginal or treaty rights. Mr. Speaker, I don't want my constituents to think that this amendment will save them from the application of Bill C-68. I would like to be, with unanimous consent, allowed to conclude my statement today.

Third Reading Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Iqaluit is seeking unanimous consent to complete his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Mr. Patterson, conclude your statement.

Third Reading Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

It will still force them to register their firearms and be licensed to purchase a firearm.

The effect of the new clause in the bill is unclear. Aboriginal people who are charged may be able to use this clause to defend themselves, but they will have to rely on an expensive and time-consuming and frustrating court process to do so. Federal Crown prosecutors will be fighting to uphold Bill C-68, we can be sure. The only people who will profit from this clause will be defence lawyers, Crown prosecutors and judges. This non-derogation clause will not give the Inuit the clear protection and complete exemption from the application of the bill which they want and deserve.

Mr. Speaker, I want to say as clearly as I can to my constituents, don't let anyone fool you into thinking that the Inuit land claim agreement will protect you from the effects of this invasive law. Don't be misled into thinking that a new clause in the bill paying lip service to aboriginal and treaty rights will protect you from this invasive law, either.

This bill is no good for us. It won't work; it won't be respected; it will be a colossal waste of money much better spent on community justice priorities, including more police officers. These feeble amendments have not dealt with the fundamental problems we face with this bill in the north. Qujannamiik, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Third Reading Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 3, Members' statements. Mrs. Thompson.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It is with a heavy heart that I rise in this House today. I have heard that Bill C-68 will have its final reading in the House of Commons and then be referred to the Senate for their review. Mr. Speaker, it is obvious to all Members of this Assembly that the federal government consultation process on this bill was nothing more than smoke and mirrors.

It is truly unfortunate, Mr. Speaker, that the federal government has decided to ignore the needs of the people we are privileged to represent. This bill and it's provisions will create undue hardship for those who rely on guns as a tool to feed their families, protect themselves and maintain their lifestyles.

Mr. Speaker, as an aboriginal woman of Inuit descent, I have seen the effects of well-meaning kabloona on the welfare of my people. I strongly believe, Mr. Speaker, that this bill, Bill C-68, will create the same types of hardship for my people as the Greenpeace people did over the seal hunt.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Shame.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Manitok Thompson Aivilik

In this crucial time leading up to division, we have enough on our plates in Nunavut and in the western Arctic without having to implement and enforce laws that do not represent our constituents' needs.

The federal government has said that the implementation and enforcement of the provisions of the Gun Control Act will be provincial or territorial responsibilities. Where will we get the money? As I speak, Mr. Speaker, the western Arctic is well on its way to the worst fire season ever. In Nunavut, there are still serious housing shortages that need to be addressed. The federal government has consistently cut back the money they give us to administer these programs and yet, by the same token, Mr. Speaker, expect our government to take on more responsibility with less money.

Mr. Speaker, I would like consent from my colleagues to continue.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Kivallivik -- Aivilik, sorry -- is seeking unanimous consent to conclude her statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mrs. Thompson.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In Ottawa, the people of the north are represented in the ruling Liberal party by two outstanding aboriginal people, Mr. Jack Anawak and the Honourable Ethel Blondin-Andrew. These two people are, unfortunately, linked to the concept of party discipline. Ms. Blondin-Andrew and Mr. Anawak are supposed to subject their feelings, and those of their constituents, to the greater political will of their party and the rest of urban Canada.

Mr. Speaker, this issue is too important to northerners for our two elected representatives to toe the party line and vote in the affirmative. They must come out and support the people they represent, regardless of the consequences. They have no alternative. The electorate will not forgive or forget such an insult to their way of life.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, I quote from an article in yesterday's Toronto Star in which Ms. Blondin-Andrew said on the issue of her voting on the gun control bill that, "A person can't die on every hill. You have to pick the hill you're going to die on, but the people in my riding are telling me this is my hill." This quote, Mr. Speaker, is twofold. If Mrs. Blondin-Andrew chooses to vote for her party, she risks losing her seat in the next federal election. If she chooses to truly represent her constituents and vote against the bill, she risks alienating herself from her party.

Obviously, Mr. Speaker, this is not an easy decision for our MPs to make, but they must remember that they were elected to be our voice in Ottawa and that voice, Mr. Speaker, is loud and clear. I trust they will make the right decision for the people by voting against Bill C-68. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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An Hon. Member

Hear! Hear!

---Applause

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Ms. Mike.

Preparation Of Nwt-wide Organizations For Division
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As we enter into our discussions and deliberations on Bill 25, Education Act, it makes me think about planning for education in Nunavut in preparation for 1999. In addition to my Member's statement last week about the resolutions made in Gjoa Haven by Nunavut leaders, I'm concerned about what our future holds for our teachers in the east.

As the Government of the Northwest Territories plans for division of its resources, assets and liabilities, it must be recognized that there are a variety of organizations that may also need to plan for an equitable split of their resources between east and west. As most Members are aware, teachers in the north belong to the NWT Teachers' Association. Over one-third of the members of the NWT Teachers' Association reside in Nunavut. Should it be decided that the teachers not be represented by the same association in the east as in the west, due consideration must be given to a process for the division of resources and assets.

It is crucial that organizations that are NWT-wide begin to address these questions immediately, in order to adequately prepare for life after Nunavut. Teachers' representation is just one area that we must be aware of, Mr. Speaker, where a body established by statute may take on new forms in preparation for or after division of the territories. In our haste to plan for division of government assets, liabilities and entities, we must not lose sight of those bodies and organizations that are also facing the same decisions and challenges. As much as possible, this government must be committed to assist in the process for all northerners. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Preparation Of Nwt-wide Organizations For Division
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Ms. Mike. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Lewis.

Snare River Hydro Project
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

Brian Lewis Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This afternoon, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Morin made a Minister's statement about using our own people and our own resources to solve our own problems. My statement this afternoon, Mr. Speaker, is on a similar theme.

Last Saturday, Mr. Speaker, I joined people from the Power Corporation, utility and mining companies, as well as Dogrib leaders on a visit to the Snare River hydro project. Mr. Whitford already referred to this visit yesterday. It was meaningful for him because he had been there early in his career with the Power Corporation 30 years ago. The visit was meaningful for me too, Mr. Speaker, because I've had a lifelong interest in northern responsible government and northern self-sufficiency.

Mr. Speaker, I'm delighted to see the development of our hydro potential. Although there will always be critics of man's attempts to harness the forces of nature, I believe hydro is one of the most responsible ways of generating power. It is clean and sustainable. The future of Yellowknife and the Dogrib people, although many Yellowknifers don't realize it yet, are very closely connected. The Dogrib own much of the land and will have a major say in development in the Yellowknife region. The Snare hydro project is exciting, Mr. Speaker. It's not huge or overwhelming, you can understand it, and it is much like others throughout the world which are a little bit overwhelming to the average individual.

The Snare project was begun over 40 years ago. We have learned from the experience. Now as the city of Yellowknife enjoys rapid growth and we seem on the verge of increased industrial activity in the region, it is nice to see the Dogrib people and the various companies planning to meet our future energy needs. It's nice to see groups working in harmony on such an important project. Soon, hopefully, Yellowknife will no longer be dependent on imported diesel to generate power. It's a perfect example of import replacement, which we all agree is one of the keys to our future economic well-being.

Using our own resources and our own people is the major road to economic self-sufficiency.

I was told over the weekend, Mr. Speaker, that we are in danger of losing the kind of harmony that we need to solve all our problems, but this is one example of where we are succeeding. Thank you.

---Applause

Snare River Hydro Project
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Koe.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, June 11th, I had the privilege and honour to attend the grand opening ceremonies of the new Western Arctic Regional Visitors' Centre which is located in Inuvik. It was a beautiful day in Inuvik with over 300 people in attendance to enjoy the ceremony, the entertainment and the feasting. There are many people and many organizations to thank and I would like to take this opportunity to do this.

First of all, I would like to thank Minister Todd and all the previous Ministers of Economic Development and Cabinets for supporting this worthy project. I say Ministers and Cabinets because this project has been in the planning and development stages for a long time. I know because when I was regional superintendent for the department in 1987, we started talks on the development of this project.

People say that all good things take time and from the building that is there now, it looks like it has been done right. I would also like to thank the various deputy ministers, the assistant deputy ministers and other departmental staff who have been involved in this project. Special mention should be made of John Cournoyea, who I believe has been the only consistent player in this project from day one. John is the manager for parks and visitor services in the Inuvik region.

People in Inuvik, especially the Inuvialuit and Gwich'in organizations, have played key roles in this project. They formed a joint venture to construct this building using Tetlit'zheh Construction Limited as a general contractor. The themes and displays which are in and around the building will depict the Inuvialuit and Gwich'in lifestyles and history. The display designers also deserve credit for a job well done.

I would also like to thank all the people who helped make this special day a success. Mr. Speaker, I seek consent to continue my statement.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Inuvik is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mr. Koe.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Fred Koe Inuvik

Qujannamiik, Mr. Speaker. The people I would like to thank are the weathermen, for the good day we had; Lloyd Binder and his staff from Economic Development and Tourism; Billy Day and the Inuvik Community Corporation; Willard Hagen and the Gwich'in Tribal Council; the elders and youth who participated in the ribbon-cutting ceremonies; the people who prepared the food; Andrea Camerand and the staff of the visitors' centre; Mike Tryon and members of the Western Arctic Tourism Association; the Inuvik Delta drummers and dancers; Ruby McLeod's East Three Wheelers; and, the Inuvik Choral and Theatrical Society. I would also like to thank Premier Cournoyea for attending and participating in the opening ceremonies.

I would like to give special mention also to Gordie Campbell for making the dedication to the bush pilots of the Beaufort/Delta area. One of the displays outside of the centre is a real airplane. I believe it is a Cessna 170A airplane, which was owned and operated by Freddy Carmichael of Reindeer Air Services. This airplane is mounted on a swivel and anchored so that the plane can move into whatever direction the wind is blowing. It is something to see. Congratulations go to all the bush pilots who were pioneers in aviation and helped to develop the north.

For everyone else whom I did not mention today, I, on behalf of the people of Inuvik and region, wish to congratulate you on a job well done and a visitors' centre which we should all be proud of. Mahsi.

---Applause

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Allooloo.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to talk about the challenges we face as northern people and safety on the land. This is a great time of year to be out on the land. At least back home, the fish are running. The char are going out to see. Snow geese are nesting. Murres and ducks are coming back to nest on the cliffs. The young seals are sunbathing on the ice and people are whale hunting out on the floe. School is out in most of the communities and families are heading out in spring and summer camps.

Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, too many accidents are happening every year that could be avoided. Mr. Speaker, I would like to caution everyone to be careful while enjoying the traditional activities out on the land and outdoors, particularly at this time of year when the weather can be deceiving. It can be a warm and sunny day, but the water is extremely cold. Hypothermia can happen very quickly, as I found out last weekend when I was out in my kayak. Most of the time, Mr. Speaker, I can get up again. But I was shocked to discover how cold the water is when you tip over. My body went numb. Thankfully, I was wearing a lifejacket and I was travelling with experienced paddlers who rescued me before I was overcome by the cold water. It took the rest of the day for my body to warm itself.

Accidents can be prevented, Mr. Speaker, if people take time to prepare before heading out. People must remember to let other people know where they are going and when they expect to return. Travellers on the land must learn to anticipate dangerous situations and avoid them at all costs. Back home when hunting along the floe, the ice sometimes breaks off. The hunters find themselves...Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Amittuq is seeking unanimous consent. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mr. Allooloo.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Back home when hunting along the floe, the ice sometimes breaks off. The hunters find themselves adrift on the ocean. An experienced hunter knows exactly what to do in this situation. Traditional knowledge will tell you to avoid the situation that could leave you adrift in the Arctic Ocean. An experienced person or hunter could be in great danger in this situation.

Mr. Speaker, being on the land will always involve a certain amount of danger, but if we draw upon the knowledge of our elders, who have been here longer than we have, as well as taking advantage of new technology that can be found today, we and our families will enjoy many accident-free days on the land, whether that be an overnight camping trip or pursuing traditional lifestyles many miles away from our home community. I wish those people who are going out on the land and doing their traditional activities a very successful trip. Thank you.

---Applause

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Allooloo. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Antoine.

Successful Trip Of Ed&t Minister To Nahendeh
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this past weekend was a very eventful one for me in the constituency I represent, which is Nahendeh.

The Honourable John Todd and his staff travelled with me into Nahendeh this past weekend, June 9th to 11th. We visited Fort Simpson, Nahanni Butte, Fort Liard and Trout Lake. In Fort Simpson, Mr. Speaker, on Friday we had meetings with the village council, the band councils and held public meetings. Individual meetings were also held with people who had concerns about the business situations. I think it was a very successful visit we had in Fort Simpson.

On Saturday, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Todd and staff, along with the board members of the NWT Development Corporation, travelled to Nahanni Butte to meet with people and view construction of a new building that is taking place there. This new building will have a store, hotel rooms, a coffee shop and a place to clean up, like showers and so forth. This is a joint venture between the NWT Development Corporation and the Nahanni Butte Development Corporation.

This is a major step for the people of Nahanni Butte. They got work from Economic Development, with the help of this development corporation. This building is going to be able to help them in a way that it hasn't before, Mr. Speaker. For many years, tourists have been travelling by this community, coming out of the Nahanni National Park, and now they have a reason to stop. This way, the people from the community will have the opportunity to benefit from the economic

opportunities that exist there. So I think it was a very satisfying visit there.

Later that day, Mr. Speaker, we travelled on to Fort Liard where we had official openings of a number of buildings -- a gas bar and convenience store and a new craft shop for the Acho-Dene crafts business -- as well as viewing a new firehall that was built there.

The new crafts shop was built with the help of the NWT Development Corporation. Fort Liard has made a name for itself in the past, and they have been very successful in marketing their own products. Mr. Speaker, I have run out of time. I am seeking unanimous consent to finish my statement.

Successful Trip Of Ed&t Minister To Nahendeh
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Nahendeh is seeking unanimous consent. Do we have any nays? There are no nays. Go ahead, Mr. Antoine.

Successful Trip Of Ed&t Minister To Nahendeh
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Like I was saying, in Fort Liard, the people there have made a successful name for themselves in the fine arts and crafts that they produce there. The most known item is the birch bark basket. The facilities that they were using were old facilities with no running water and no washing facilities, but they were able to make a good name for themselves in that type of facility. With this new, modern facility, it will give them a better chance of success.

So, with this new facility and the continued efforts of the people of Fort Liard, their success is going to be very real. I would like to thank the Minister and his department and the NWT Development Corporation for their help in this area. Later on, the social events that followed in Fort Liard were enjoyed by all.

On a serious note, Mr. Speaker, in visiting all these communities and in seeing all these various economic development opportunities that exist, there is still a real need for an economic development conference to take place in the Deh Cho region. I have spoken in the House in the past and I do so today. There is definitely a need, more than ever, to get the people of the region together to talk about the possible economic development opportunities that exist and a plan of action that could be developed from such a conference.

It was a very rewarding weekend, Mr. Speaker, and for the people of the communities and myself to see their ideas and their work and effort coming to a reality with the construction and completion of all these projects. Without the support from the Government of the Northwest Territories and the Members of this Legislative Assembly, this could not have become a reality. So I would like to thank the Members here, on behalf of the people of Nahendeh, for their support. Mahsi.

---Applause

Successful Trip Of Ed&t Minister To Nahendeh
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Sister Sutherland's Book On Bishop Piche
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to express my sincere congratulations to Sister Agnes Sutherland on her completion of writing her third book, The Bishop Who Cared: A Legacy of Leadership. Mr. Speaker, her

first book was a souvenir album in 1984 on Bishop Piche and her second book was Living Kindness on Madeline Bird.

Sister Sutherland is well known to many northerners as being an advocate for the disabled and the homeless. In addition to creating the first home for an abuse shelter, she takes the time to write books. Sister Sutherland wrote about Bishop Piche in her first book, on his silver jubilee as a Bishop but golden anniversary in the priesthood.

He was accepted by the oblate congregation of Mary Immaculate, which is the OMI, in 1932, and as a priest in 1934. In March 1959, he was appointed Bishop of the Mackenzie. Bishop Piche was born in 1909 and, as I said, ordained as a priest in 1934. He retired in February 1986 after being our Bishop for many years. He passed away in September 1992. The late Bishop Piche now rests in the crypt of the same cathedral, St. Joseph's Cathedral, in Fort Smith.

Sister Sutherland this Saturday will be launching the book, The Bishop Who Cared: A Legacy of Leadership. She has also created nice placemats made out of the book's cover and is attempting to get them fixed so they will be ready for the launching this weekend.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to take the time to thank the individual who suggested the title, The Bishop Who Cared, who is Anita Dube; and the subtitle, A Legacy of Leadership, who is George Tuccaro. Bishop Piche believed strongly in education, particularly opportunities of education for the native people in the north. I want to quote a couple of points from the book, and I quote from Anita Dube's assessment of Bishop Piche, where she said, and I quote: "There...". I apologize, Mr. Speaker. I seek unanimous consent to continue with my statement.

Sister Sutherland's Book On Bishop Piche
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1284

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Thebacha is seeking unanimous consent to conclude her statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Sister Sutherland's Book On Bishop Piche
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you. I quote from Anita Dube's assessment of Bishop Piche, and it reads: "There is so much goodness about him. His caring and love of the poor was outstanding. He was also a good listener to anyone who needed to be heard." Another quote from Louise Fraser: "He never missed coming to the health centre to visit the sick and those who could no longer get around."

Mr. Speaker, many people believed that this book should be dedicated to the Grey Nuns and the Oblate Fathers and Brothers, which I fully agree with. Those individuals were Helen Daniels, Anita Dube, Jeannie and Oral Dube, Emelia Gratrix, Charles Issoluk, Rene and Georgina Mercredi, Martha Mercredi, Elsie Yanik, Jo Jo Mercredi, Louise Fraser, Rosalie Dempsey and Karen Price.

Mr. Speaker, I want to take the time not only to congratulate Sister Sutherland but thank the individuals who participated in the Bishop Paul Piche Memoir Committee, who are Pat Burke, Helena Mandeville, Shirley Vandenberghe and John Vogt for all

their work in being able to produce such a beautiful book. Thank you.

---Applause

Sister Sutherland's Book On Bishop Piche
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mrs. Marie-Jewell. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Nerysoo.

Western Arctic Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1284

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, had the opportunity to attend the opening of the Western Arctic Visitors' Centre in Inuvik.

Mr. Speaker, I want to pay additional tribute to Chief James Firth, Willard Hagen, who is the president of the Gwich'in Tribal Council, and to Danny Lennie, who was involved on behalf of the Inuvialuit. I think it was as a result of their persistence that the Western Arctic Visitors' Centre became a reality.

It also, Mr. Speaker, shows that with good planning and good cooperation, aboriginal peoples can cooperate and collaborate in a very successful project and encourage and recommend to our Cabinet Members that the approaches that they are suggesting would be very constructive. I want to say, Mr. Speaker, that the information that has been provided and displayed is a reflection of the advice of many of my constituents from Inuvik, Fort McPherson and Aklavik or Tsiigehtchic, and also as a result of advice from many other people from the Beaufort and Mackenzie Delta region.

So, Mr. Speaker, I wanted to congratulate all those who were involved in this particular project. I know that having seen this display and the information that is provided, I can say that in my term as Minister and as a Member of this Assembly, I've had an opportunity to travel to many other visitors' centres across the Northwest Territories and this is by far, I believe, one of the most informative displays of any region in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Western Arctic Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1284

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 3, Member's statements. Mr. Whitford.

Retirement Of Teacher Jean Paul Grimard
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1284

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, colleagues. This past weekend, on Saturday, I had the opportunity to represent the Honourable Richard Nerysoo at a retirement get together for Jean Paul Grimard. Jean Paul Grimard was a school teacher, very well-known in the Fort Smith area. He taught math, physics and computers at the JB Tyrrell School and the PW Kaeser High School. He's been a teacher in the north for 30 years. He came from Prud'homme, Saskatchewan. He is from a French-Canadian family, one of 11 boys and girls from that family.

He took up teaching and for his first teaching assignment, he was interviewed by Gordon Devitt to go teach in the Baffin. In the interview, Mr. Devitt asked him what religion he was and he said he was Catholic. He replied that he couldn't work in the Baffin because they were all Protestant and he had to go to the west, so he went to Fort Smith, which was our good fortune.

He was very well-known in the community and he tutored a lot of students in the off hours. He taught during the day but if you needed any help with math, physics or computers, he was always there to help. Mr. Speaker, you will probably recall that I was at the adult school there later on in my life, trying to get my grade 12 so I could go to university. I needed some help in math and Mr. Grimard was right there to pitch in. I had the pleasure of being a student of his for a short period of time and, just recently, my son was also tutored by him, too.

When I talked on behalf of the Minister, I told the people there about his life and there were a good number of people from Fort Smith at the reception. They rose to give him a standing ovation for his 30 years of dedication to the Government of the Northwest Territories and the people of the Northwest Territories as a teacher. These days, it's very rare to have that kind of commitment. I would certainly like to say, on behalf of the people I represent, thank you to Mr. Grimard for his long service.

---Applause

Retirement Of Teacher Jean Paul Grimard
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1285

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Pudlat.

Passage Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1285

Kenoayoak Pudlat Baffin South

(Translation) Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today with regard to the proposed gun control legislation, Bill C-68. As we heard, this will finally be dealt with by the Government of Canada. We have proposed quite a few amendments to this proposed bill and tried, as best we can, to represent the views of our constituents, whether they are aboriginal or non-aboriginal. It has been quite hard to get through to the people who are dealing with this bill, the great impact that will be felt by northerners, especially by our hunters. With hunting being our way of life, we have survived with subsistence hunting from the time of our ancestors.

Today, as we try our best to reflect the views of our constituents, sometimes it is quite hard to be heard by the federal government. I hope that at least some of our views will be included in the amendments to Bill C-68, especially the more serious concerns. I hope they are being dealt with. However, I would like to extend my apologies to our constituents because some of our views were not heard by the federal government task force and the MPs. It is our hope that the implementation of this proposed bill is delayed for the north. It is unfortunate that it was quite confusing for the people of the north to understand the happenings throughout the discussions on this bill. Thank you for giving me the opportunity to voice my concern on this. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Passage Of Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1285

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Pudlat. Item 3, Members' statements. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Ms. Mike.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 1285

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm very pleased to recognize Tim Dialla from Pangnirtung. He's the fire chief and foreman of the hamlet of Pangnirtung. As well, he is the JP and coroner. Thank you.

---Applause

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 1285

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. I missed one item here, item 4. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Mr. Arngna'naaq.

Return To Question 547-12(7): Regulations Re Cleaning Of Caribou Carcasses
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

Page 1285

Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have a return to an oral question asked by Mr. Whitford on June 8, 1995 regarding regulations re cleaning of caribou carcasses.

Mr. Speaker, the Wildlife Act and regulations are silent with respect to how and where wild animals are cleaned. Attempting to impose regulations on this activity would be extremely difficult to enforce, simply because of the length of the Ingraham Trail and other highways in the Northwest Territories.

The Motor Vehicles Act, subsection 232.(1), makes it an offence to "litter" highways. The intent of this section is to ensure safety for motorists. A frozen gut pile, hide or head is obviously a hazard to them. Hunters are expected to use common sense and to clean their animals where the animal is killed or in the nearest appropriate place. The department encourages people to do this and will continue to do so. If this was done, few gut piles would end up on the roads and in ditches. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 547-12(7): Regulations Re Cleaning Of Caribou Carcasses
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

Page 1285

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Ballantyne.

Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1285

Michael Ballantyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister of Transportation. The Minister is aware that the Ingraham Trail is the most travelled road in the Northwest Territories. There are tourists, people from Dettah, cottagers, day users from the Yellowknife area, and in the wintertime, the mine is supplied.

Recently, I've had some complaints about the condition of the road. I would like to ask the Minister if he would ensure his staff has a look at the road and make sure that the road is put up to the highest standard possible. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Laughter

Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1285

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Transportation, Mr. Todd.

Return To Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

John Todd Keewatin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, there is a grader on this road today. There have been numerous complaints from the honourable Member's constituency. It is our intention to put a grader on this road today to try to improve it, to try to repair some of the more dangerous parts of the road this week, and at the end of this month, calcium treat it to ensure it stays in reasonable condition.

---Applause

Return To Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Question 586-12(7): Maintenance Of Ingraham Trail
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, oral questions. Mrs. Thompson.

Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Premier. On April 12, 1995, Dennis Patterson made a motion urging the GNWT to evaluate official language services and develop a plan that would consider both the fiscal realities and priorities set by communities. The motion suggested that the plan should include all official language funding for all GNWT departments, boards and agencies. Can the Premier provide an update on work relating to the motion? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Madam Premier.

Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the work that would be included in the process would be what is included in vote 1 and vote 4. The focus is on services to the Assembly. It would also be the work done on interpreting/translation and the role of the language bureau. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mrs. Thompson.

Supplementary To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My supplementary question to the Premier is could the Minister describe how communities were consulted on their priorities for language services. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Supplementary To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, at this stage, the communities have not been consulted. They will be consulted on the guidelines and also on the Education, Culture and Employment initiatives, which would involve community-based languages. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mrs. Thompson.

Supplementary To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I understand that the deputy minister for official languages has been away on a Governor General's tour for six weeks and has not been replaced. Has her absence had any impact on finalizing the handbook? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Supplementary To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

No, Mr. Speaker. The continuation of the handbook has not been jeopardized by the assistant deputy minister's absence. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Question 587-12(7): Update On Motion Re Official Languages
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Koe.

Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. We are all aware that funding has been reduced for official languages. With the reduction of vote 4 funding for official languages, there is a need to review the allocation of funds among the departments, the boards and the agencies. I would like to know who is responsible for reviewing the allocation of funds.

Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, there is a committee of deputy ministers that meet to do the evaluation. But in their work, they would need Cabinet and MLA decisions as part of the budget. Mr. Speaker, for the year 1995-96, the criteria were French, which meets the legal obligations and infrastructure costs; and aboriginal, which maximizes community-based maintenance revitalization. These are in the agreement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Supplementary, Mr. Koe.

Supplementary To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi. I would assume then that the committee of deputy ministers is obviously located in Yellowknife because very few of them have been devolved to the regions or other communities. The Premier mentioned that there is some criteria agreed upon. I would like to know what other consultation has been done because it is my understanding that there was to be consultation with the aboriginal language organizations in terms of the funding that they get. What other consultation has been done, other than by this committee of deputies amongst themselves?

Supplementary To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1286

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, in terms of the guidelines for services by government to the public set out by Cabinet, in the scope of the exercise there has been a very narrow and intense way to try to get the different departments involved, where they felt it would be appropriate to manage. The guidelines did reflect community priorities and language groups. The guidelines also indicate that it must allow departments to be accountable, and the guidelines are being translated and will be consulted by the language groups and these will be done throughout the summer. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Koe.

Supplementary To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Fred Koe Inuvik

The impact of languages affects every living human being in the north. The aboriginal groups and the French organizations are the ones that are trying to encourage languages through the various institutions. So I would like to know why it has taken so long to start this consultation process. Why are we waiting until summer? We are now into mid-June of 1995 and a quarter of our year has passed. Why has it taken so long to begin the consultation of these groups?

Supplementary To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the reason is that when we attempted to approach this very important subject, it was not as clear and easy to do mainly because we have 11 different language groups and in order to come up with a broad base of our discussions, it was much more difficult than we had anticipated. So it took us longer to establish some of those guidelines. So, Mr. Speaker, perhaps we were overly optimistic at the beginning in saying we could do this much more quickly.

As well, the Members will recognize that in the interim, the language agreement with the federal government did not bear the amounts of dollars that we thought they would and that would come through in support of this important area of government policy. So there were a number of issues that got in the way and we weren't able to deal as quickly with the issue as we wanted to. So it was a series of unplanned issues that were thrown in the way of us completing those guidelines. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Question 588-12(7): Responsibility For Reviewing Allocation Of Languages Funding
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Ningark.

Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

John Ningark Natilikmiot

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is to the Premier. Mr. Speaker, all Members are aware that there were significant cuts to money available for languages through the federal/GNWT agreement signed in March. A number of employees were funded through this vote 4 money. Mr. Speaker, can the Premier advise us how many employees have been laid off as a result of the cuts from the agreement? Thank you.

Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Return To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, in terms of the cuts to the agreement, the individuals who were laid off term positions, some of which ended and some were vacant. In French, there was 1.5 person years cut. In the aboriginal section, there were 10.5 person years cut. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Supplementary, Mr. Ningark.

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

John Ningark Natilikmiot

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In making the decision to cut positions, there must have been a process of evaluating the need for each position. Was the decision regarding which positions to cut made after consultation with communities regarding their priorities for language services? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, in terms of the decisions, they were management decisions and they were primarily at headquarters. The intent was to make sure that the community-based education and language programs were secure. So the area was headquarters that the positions were cut in.

Further Return To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Ningark.

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

John Ningark Natilikmiot

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. When positions are cut, they receive a severance package. When employees are hired under vote 4 funding, is there some payment out of the vote 4 funding?

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, I would like to take that question as notice.

Supplementary To Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Question 589-12(7): Number Of GNWT Lay-offs Due To Language Funding Cuts
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Antoine.

Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1287

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Premier with regard to legal interpreting. In April, the Minister of Justice announced that two employees from the legal interpreting program were laid off. However, the future

responsibility and status of legal interpreting was not clear. Can the Minister provide an update on what is happening with legal interpreting, including who is responsible and what changes have been made to the operations of the program? Mahsi.

Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the enhancement and maintenance of languages in that category is the role of Education, Culture and Employment. As I indicated before, in that move, emphasis was retained to move to more community-based language programs. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Antoine.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you. Can the Premier explain her answer? What I wanted to know is in the area of legal interpreting, two people were involved in the program but they are not laid off. The Premier stated that this role was moved to Education, Culture and Employment, and the move was to emphasize more community-based language programs. Can the Premier explain to me what she means by "more community-based?"

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, if I may suggest that, because of the responsibility in that certain area, this question can be more appropriately answered by the Minister of Education.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Just quick information before I get into the detail of the question. I would like to advise the honourable Member, these were not interpreters. These were terminologists. In other words, these were the individuals who were involved in developing the language or defining new words to respond to aboriginal languages that didn't have the words that were being used. So they were legal terminologists.

Secondly, Mr. Speaker, our attempt right now is to ensure the language development enhancement responsibility rests with the appropriate language group and language community. For so long, the government has assumed the responsibility for the development of this particular area. After an analysis of the languages agreement, it's our view that the responsibility and the financial resources should be placed in the hands of the language groups, rather than the government assuming the responsibility. That's the direction we intend to take.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Supplementary, Mr. Antoine.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My supplementary question is for the Premier. During the recent trial in Dettah about hunting on the Ingraham Trail, there were complaints about the legal interpreting being provided. Some people felt that the legal arguments were not interpreted so that the Dene people could understand them. In light of the concern raised, has the department taken a second look at the changes to the legal interpreting program? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the language agreement and the programs under the language agreement are an ongoing issue. The government is aware that there is a requirement to develop a better base for enhancing the programs. I believe in terms of the enhancement and maintenance of the program, that the Minister of Education would be in a better position to answer that particular question. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Just for the information of my honourable colleagues, I believe that is one of the reasons we had concern about the various locations in our government with regard to terminologists. In other words, we had groups that were in different departments. What we needed to do was bring together a collective approach on addressing technical terms, whether they be in health or in the area of legal definitions. Part of that also requires us to review the whole matter of interpreter/translator training, because that work has to be part of the delivery of that particular component.

So we take the concern that the honourable Member has raised seriously. That is why we're trying to ensure that we deliver the best training programs and the best support services that we can in a collective manner. That is why we have raised that particular concern. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Antoine.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1288

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to address, through you, a question to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. The question is with regard to legal interpreting. We have a situation in Dettah where the services of the two people who were laid off would have come in very usefully. However, they were laid off. Now we're waiting for a program to take shape. My point here is that we had people in place who could do the work, but they've been laid off, and now another department has taken over this responsibility and

we're into an area where these programs are being developed. What changes have been made to the operations of the program, if such a program exists now? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just want to advise the honourable Member that that particular matter is presently under review. We had a contract for a group to carry out that review. In fact, one of the portions was to consult the appropriate language groups so they were satisfied with the approach we were taking or the training we were offering. The other component is that we had to meet the determination as to which organization actually assumed the responsibility for the delivery of training.

The issue here can't be simply a matter of personalities. The fact is that there is still a lot of work with regard to terminology, both in the legal and in the health sense, that is very important to our people. The Dene languages, particularly, need to have the work done in a collective sense. In other words, we can't have one department assuming the responsibility for dealing with terminology, another department dealing with that issue, then having, for instance, the language bureau responsible for one portion of the training, Arctic College assuming the responsibility for another component of the training; then, we also have the cultural institutes that are also wanting to get involved in the whole matter of training. So this issue of all these components has to be reviewed, and we have to deliver the best services -- as the honourable Member has suggested -- to our aboriginal community; both the Inuktitut-speaking community and the Dene community.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. You have one final supplementary to the Minister of Education, Mr. Antoine.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My final supplementary to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment; if the present training program has been developed...There was a training program that was field-monitored and tested, is it going to be modified by interpreters? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, I think there is a necessity for us to ensure we're responding to the appropriate language community in order for them to receive the best support possible. If there is a requirement to address the issue of training and to improve that training program consultation, Mr. Speaker, we will certainly ensure that that happens. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Question 590-12(7): Update On Legal Interpreting Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Again, I will remind Members that when they ask questions, they ask the questions of the appropriate Ministers. It is quite unfair to other Members when Members ask questions and another Minister has to respond. We have in this case, Mr. Antoine asking at least six questions at any given one time. I will ask the Members to make sure the appropriate Ministers respond to the questions asked. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Whitford.

Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Good afternoon. Mr. Speaker, I have a question I would like to direct to the Minister responsible for Transportation. Recently, Mr. Speaker, a number of my constituents complained to me about receiving tickets from the RCMP for failing to have vehicle licences. In fact, their plates had expired, the reason being that they were never notified that the plates were expiring. The police apparently made enquiries and they were told by the department that there was a glitch in the computer system that had prevented them from doing that.

I would like to ask the Minister if he's aware of this problem and if he could see to it that some corrections are made forthwith, not so much because of the inconvenience, but it brings people into conflict with the law as a result of this.

Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Transportation, Mr. Todd.

Return To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wasn't aware of this problem. I'll have it looked into and if there was a glitch in the computer system, we'll have that corrected post-haste. Thank you.

Return To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Supplementary, Mr. Whitford.

Supplementary To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to further direct a question to the Minister concerning the notification of renewals. I would like to ask the Minister whether it is a policy of the department to issue renewals. I've looked into the matter and in Alberta, it has been a policy for the last little while. I would like to ask if this is a policy in the territories as well.

Supplementary To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Todd.

Supplementary To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

John Todd Keewatin Central

Mr. Speaker, I don't believe that we give notice of renewals of licences at this time. Do we? I'm not sure about the answer to this question, so I'll take it as notice. Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Question 591-12(7): Notification Of Licence Plate Renewals
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1289

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Todd. The question has been taken as notice. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Allooloo.

Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to ask the Premier a question. Last week, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Koe asked when the handbook for official languages implementation would be ready. We are now six months past the time when the Minister originally said the document would be ready. In developing the handbook, it is critical that there be consultation with aboriginal groups. These groups represent the people directly affected by the process and procedures which will be established in the handbook. Can the Premier describe how aboriginal groups and other language interest groups were consulted during the development of the handbook? Thank you.

Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, aboriginal groups and other language interest groups had a general discussion this winter on the handbook and it is anticipated that the detailed discussions on the document will begin almost immediately. Thank you.

Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Allooloo.

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Supplementary, in the Premier's answer she said there had been general discussions with aboriginal groups. What sort of general discussions? Were they discussing how the handbook was going to be developed? What was the discussion about?

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the general discussion considered the concept of the handbook, what had to be involved and the general content of the handbook.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Allooloo.

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you. Would the Premier be able to provide to the Legislative Assembly the list of those aboriginal groups who had general discussions with the officials of the department? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, I will provide that. Thank you.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Final supplementary, Mr. Allooloo.

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In April, the Premier indicated that the draft handbook had to be reviewed due to a reduction in funding. Does the Premier have a date for when this very important guiding document will be ready? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the handbook is ready and complete. Presently, it is in for translation. It should be available very soon, once that translation has been concluded. Thank you.

Further Return To Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Question 592-12(7): Consultation For Development Of Official Languages Handbook
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Zoe.

Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Henry Zoe North Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. On June 8th, the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment made a Minister's statement with regard to the Canada-NWT infrastructure program. In his statement, he indicated that 61 proposals valued at $6.8 million was approved for 35 communities in six regions. Could I ask the honourable Minister if he could provide these specific proposals, community by community, and the values? Thank you.

Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Return To Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I can, Mr. Speaker, but that is a detailed information item. I think Members should be aware that we can't always give that information. I will provide it, though, to the honourable Member. I advised the Members of the House I would do it.

Return To Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Question 593-12(7): Projects Approved Under Canada/nwt Infrastructure Program
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Whitford.

Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1290

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have a question I would like to direct to the Minister of Renewable Resources. Mr. Speaker, besides the threat of fire and drought, I see our forests being attacked by some form of a pest. I think it's a tent caterpillar. I was listening to the radio on the weekend, Mr. Speaker, and in the Liard, a lady who does an annual report was noticing large numbers of caterpillars -- she didn't know what they were, but I believe they're tent caterpillars -- in the Liard area. I conducted a check around the city of Yellowknife and we're seeing large numbers of tent caterpillars already infesting trees. It's pretty devastating, particularly when it comes to deciduous trees, with the conditions we have now.

I would like to ask the Minister whether or not his department is aware of this and if there's anything that can be done to combat this invasion.

Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Renewable Resources, Mr. Arngna'naaq.

Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, it is something that the Department of Renewable Resources is aware of and are working with Canadian Forest Service in accessing the outbreak. In particular, in the area of Fort Liard, a particular type of tent caterpillar is a forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma diistria. It's a type of tent caterpillar.

Mr. Speaker, there is also another type of tent caterpillar which is a northern tent caterpillar, Malacosoma califonicum...

Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Some Hon. Members

Wow!

---Applause

Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

...which is found in the northern part of the western Northwest Territories. It is believed that the tent caterpillars in the Fort Liard area are from an outbreak which spread from British Columbia. From what we understand, the infestation generally lasts throughout a decade. The department expects that the infestation will spread throughout the Liard Valley and could last the rest of this decade. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Whitford.

Supplementary To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I think northerners will have observed that a lot of these infestations occur along major highways. From British Columbia and from Alberta, we notice an influx of other plants and certain species of insects. I would like to ask the Minister whether there is anything the public can do to fight this infestation before it gets out of hand. A decade is a long time to expect to be faced with this problem. Is there anything the public or the department can do to combat these intruders?

Supplementary To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Arngna'naaq.

Further Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I believe that the infestation is a natural occurrence. The last outbreak, I believe, was in the mid-1960s. To date, I don't believe there is any way of countering the infestation in the forests.

Mr. Speaker, it is a natural occurrence. If you allow it to carry through with what it does, I understand it is a defoliation of trees. It is generally light to moderate, with patches of heavy defoliation. The department, along with Canadian Forest

Service, will be assessing the area and will be able to give a full report.

To the particular question, at the present time, there is no way of trying to fight what is, I believe, a natural occurrence. I believe the best way is to leave it the way it is and to let nature take its course. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 594-12(7): Status Of Nwt Caterpillar Infestation
Question 594-12(7): Status Of NWT Caterpillar Infestation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Ms. Mike.

Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. Yesterday during question period, the Minister for the department, when I asked him about the ADM for Nunavut and in response to other questions, mentioned that trying to plan and coordinate everything is a very difficult process. Does he agree that appointing an ADM for the Department of Education, Culture and Employment for Nunavut would help the department in coordinating this very difficult process that he mentioned yesterday, causing it to be more aligned with planning for Nunavut training and education? Thank you.

Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I can't say that that's the best approach to take, Mr. Speaker, because it could be that once all the plans have been agreed to -- both the strategic plan for Aurora College and the educational plan in conjunction with the divisional boards of education, and the human resource plan in conjunction with the Nunavut training group and our department -- that there might be an individual who should be responsible for ensuring that those plans are coordinated appropriately. So we may assign that responsibility to an individual to assume the coordinating role for responding to that particular matter. But it may not necessarily be an assistant deputy minister who would assume that role.

Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Supplementary, Ms. Mike.

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As the Minister indicates, there are a number of interested parties in education and training for Nunavut. When will he get this individual in place so these interested parties can go ahead with planning in preparation for 1999?

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1291

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Just for the information of my colleagues, we already are in the

process of doing the planning. The problem is that we have not come to a conclusion on the planning. The result of that, Mr. Speaker, is that there are a number of questions that we've discussed with the divisional boards of education. I've had discussions with the Nunavut Arctic College Board. Within the next two weeks, we will be holding meetings between staff members on the matter of the college plan; and within the next several weeks, with the divisional boards of education and all the parties that have been involved, including NITC, here, in Yellowknife. So we will be able to have some sense of the direction that we then intend to go, once we've had that discussion.

That will also lead to a major forum. Our colleague, Mr. Patterson, who has been quite clear about this, said that there is a need for a conference. It is our recommendation that once we have a review of these particular plans, the report of NIC, we will then call a conference together this fall to bring all our partners together so we can agree on a plan of action. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Ms. Mike.

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Last week, Nunavut Caucus met at the request of education divisional board chairpersons from Nunavut. We heard the concerns they raised, including the resolutions that were passed in the Nunavut leaders' summit meeting on education last winter. I'm happy to hear that something is being done, Mr. Speaker. However, from my understanding, to date, the divisional board of education has not been participating in planning for Nunavut training and education strategic plans that Education may be involved in. Who can be our point of contact, if is it not the Minister, for these interested parties? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just want to advise the honourable Members that we have been meeting on a regular basis. In fact, prior to his responsibility being assigned on the income reform review process, Mr. Conrad Pilon, the assistant deputy minister of culture and careers, was involved in the development of the NITC human resource development plan. So we have already been involved in that particular process.

At this particular juncture, Mr. Speaker, Mark Cleveland who is the assistant deputy minister has been involved in discussions in this area, along with meeting with Nunavut Arctic College to address this particular issue. So we already have a point of contact in the area of post-secondary training and human resource development. What we need to do is ensure that there is a coordinated, collective approach. In other words, kindergarten to 12, the adult post-secondary training, and then the human resource training, so we have a clear approach to the development of human resources in Nunavut. We are working on that particular matter.

The other component, Mr. Speaker, that needs to be considered in the issue of future departmental responsibility is how the department will respond to division. In other words, what we intend to do in terms of structure in Nunavut. That is all part of the transitional process we're talking about. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Final supplementary, Ms. Mike.

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I know Mr. Pilon has been actively involved with the NITC, but I believe the divisional board chairpersons have very little to do with Mr. Pilon. A topic of our leaders' summit meeting in Gjoa Haven last winter was that the NIC, the GNWT, NITC and Arctic College all have training money and there were duplications in these organizations in putting out training programs. The concern was to try to make the best use of the dollars that are available. That is the reason why the concern has been raised about who will be the point of contact and why there was a request for an ADM for Nunavut so everything could be realigned.

Is it my understanding, then, that the department is working to realign all of these duplicate training programs set in Nunavut?

Supplementary To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That is exactly what we are doing at this particular time. We appreciate the concerns that the honourable Members have raised; it was also, Mr. Speaker, our concern. We had a number of agents out developing training programs and initiatives. Again, I must say to the Members that the desirability of clear training responsibility for human resource development in Nunavut resting, for instance, in the hands of Nunavut Arctic College, has been quite clearly articulated by the Members of the Nunavut Caucus and, more specifically, by the honourable Member for Iqaluit on a number of occasions in this House.

We agree with the Member and we also agree with Members of the Nunavut Caucus that there has to be a coordinated approach. We have been working in conjunction with a number of these parties, have met with them on a number of occasions in the last year and have been working with them on the human resource development plan as well. So, we agree with the honourable Member that there is a need for a coordinated approach in this area. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Question 595-12(7): Appointment Of Adm For Nunavut Education Issues
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, oral questions. Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1292

Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to ask the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment a question about the budget commitments of Aurora College. Mr. Speaker, tomorrow night there will be a public meeting in

Fort Smith to discuss the proposed new recreation complex. In the pamphlet that has been circulated by the community, it appears that $400,000 will be allocated from Aurora College's budget. Many of my constituents asked me whether or not Aurora College is, indeed, granting $400,000 towards the town's recreation complex, and I indicated to them that I would ask the Minister because nothing had appeared in the budget books.

I would like to ask the Minister if he can indicate to this House whether or not $400,000 has been committed from the Aurora's College's budget for the new Fort Smith recreation complex. Thank you.

Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Nerysoo.

Return To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. There has been no formal commitment of $400,000 to the project, Mr. Speaker. In fact, in order for us to even consider it, there would have to be discussions and there hasn't been any discussions to date between the two parties, either Aurora College, the municipality or an agent on behalf of the community. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Supplementary, Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Supplementary To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That probably helps my constituents somewhat. The Minister stated that there have been no discussions between the two parties. Is he aware of a possible request to the board of governors of Arctic College for this funding? Thank you.

Supplementary To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Nerysoo.

Further Return To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I can only advise the honourable Member that this particular matter was raised with me, but not in the context of supporting the initiative. They only said they would like to talk about it at some time. I can advise the honourable Member that there have been no discussions with the staff or president of Aurora College on this issue and there is no submission requesting the resources from the board of governors of Aurora College.

Further Return To Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Question 596-12(7): Funding From Aurora College For New Fort Smith Recreation Complex
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Koe.

Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Fred Koe Inuvik

Qujannamiik, Mr. Speaker. I assume there has been a lot of work going on with regard to the amalgamation of the departments of Health and Social Services. I would like to ask the Minister of Health and Social Services about the current status of the amalgamation of the two departments.

Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Health and Social Services, Ms. Cournoyea.

Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, with regard to the headquarters organization and amalgamation, I would say that we're almost completed, that there is very little left. What we have to do now is determine how to work the two departments at the regional and community levels. That work still has to be completed. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Supplementary, Mr. Koe.

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Fred Koe Inuvik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Who is doing the evaluation, or the work in trying to get the communities organized so they can amalgamate?

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Ms. Cournoyea.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, the area where that particular function would be is in the community health area of the Department of Health and Social Services. As well, I have a number of other people working on it, primarily to get the so-called "show" on the road. The deputy minister is greatly involved with that, as well. Thank you.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Supplementary, Mr. Koe.

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. There are many projects under way or in the planning stages in the regions and communities. There is a definite need for cooperation and coordination between the departments. In speaking to people who work in both departments, they seem to be waiting for someone with a magic wand to say, now you're one department, get at it. Is there someone in the regions, say in the Inuvik region, who is in charge of working on the amalgamation process?

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Ms. Cournoyea.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1293

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, I'm very pleased by the response we're getting from the regions and from the communities. They certainly have been very actively pursuing the department to get things done. There have been several meetings in the various regions and with interest groups as well, to determine how we're going to accomplish the amalgamation and the planning for these two departments. It was my intention that we do further work in putting together a plan of action to go forward at the regional levels. I haven't been able to do that, Mr. Speaker, at this time

because I've not had the time to dedicate some clear thinking time as we've been caught up in some of the meetings that we are having, which have been important to attend. So I don't have anyone clearly defined and assigned to the communities yet.

I didn't want to have the regions put in a situation where one part of the consolidation would feel that they were the lead entity and one would feel left out. It was my intention, as soon as we get some free time, to go myself with the officials to the regions and work out a plan. I know that the regions themselves are thinking about it and actively putting down their thoughts on how we can shortcut some of the bureaucracy that generally leads to tying up this type of initiative.

Mr. Speaker, I do have a great deal of support from my Cabinet colleagues to try to get the region working towards consolidation. I know that the communities themselves would like to know when they can move on their own initiatives.

Mr. Speaker, we'll do the best we can. I know summer is coming, but we don't intend to slow down the process because where some regions would use a certain time of the year as being appropriate to them, I think we can organize our time and our initiatives with those regions in order that it can accommodate the greater number of people possible in those communities. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Final supplementary, Mr. Koe.

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Can the Premier advise us when she envisages the amalgamation process being completed?

Supplementary To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Ms. Cournoyea.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, as we knew, there was a lot of work to be done and that would have to be done over this year; there are some pilot projects that will be undertaken. The time frame for completion, I believe, is December 1995 with everything in place by April 1, 1996. Thank you.

Further Return To Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Question 597-12(7): Status Of Health And Social Services Amalgamation
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, questions. Mr. Patterson.

Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have to say -- and perhaps it wasn't fair that the Premier didn't get notice of the theme of today's question period -- that I did get the impression overall that there hasn't been a lot of progress made on long-outstanding issues like the long-awaited handbook; there hasn't been promised consultation with community groups on official languages funding. I know the Premier has very heavy responsibilities and very massive

responsibilities with Health and Social Services, as well as being the First Minister in the government. I would like to ask her -- out of sympathy for the heavy duty she has -- in light of the frustrations with official languages that she must be experiencing, is the Premier considering reassigning the responsibility for official languages to another Minister?

Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Madam Premier.

Return To Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

Nellie Cournoyea Nunakput

Mr. Speaker, I believe that no matter if an individual had this portfolio all by its lonesome self, we would be faced with the same difficulties or challenges to implement such a significant program with so many different languages that are to be accommodated.

As the Member knows, quite a significant part of the language program has already been transferred to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. This role takes on the very significant area, the encouragement of maintenance and enhancement of languages where the fundamental role is to try to move to the community-based support. In fact, this responsibility is shared; however, I know that the honourable Member realizes that it's very difficult to please everyone given that the languages are at various stages and have various needs; whereby some languages are very developed and used on a day-to-day basis, other language groups are looking for other areas of support to make sure that even just the development of the language or the writing of the language is put in place. So, for anyone, it's not an easy task if you want to do it right. I believe that it will continue to be a difficult decision to see who gets the support, because there are limits to the amount of money that this program has in its budget.

Mr. Speaker, other than the sharing of this responsibility with Education, Culture and Employment and the other parts of the program, there was no intention at this time or in the remaining time of this government to make further changes. Thank you.

Return To Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Question 598-12(7): Reassignment Of Official Languages Responsibilities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 1294

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 6, time for questions is now over. Item 7, written questions. Mr. Patterson.

Written Question 31-12(7): Funds Transferred From The Inuktitut Literacy Training Program
Item 7: Written Questions

Page 1294

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My written question is for the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Recently, Vote 4 Official Languages funds previously allotted to the very successful Inuktitut literacy program at Nunatta Campus, Nunavut Arctic College, which offered Inuktitut literacy training to every Arctic College student, has now been directed to the Nunavut Arctic College's interpreter/translator program.

Would the Minister responsible for the Department of Education, Culture and Employment please advise this House:

1. Who authorized this decision? 2. Why wasn't the college board or the college vice-president or the affected MLAs consulted about this significant change?

3. Does the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment believe that the interpreter/translator program is more important than the Inuktitut literacy program?

Thank you.

Written Question 31-12(7): Funds Transferred From The Inuktitut Literacy Training Program
Item 7: Written Questions

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 7, written questions. Item 8, returns to written questions. Item 9, replies to opening address. Item 10, petitions. Item 11, reports of standing and special committees. Item 12, reports of committees on the review of bills. Item 13, tabling of documents. Mr. Nerysoo.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wish to table Tabled Document 122-12(7), a letter from Mr. Daniel Cuerrier, president, La Federation Franco-TeNoise, Iqaluit, dated June 6, 1995, concerning tabling the Education Act of the Northwest Territories for third reading. Members should note the suggestions that are being made in the letter. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 13, tabling of documents. Ms. Mike.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Tabled Document 123-12(7) are the resolutions passed during the Nunavut leaders' summit meeting in Gjoa Haven from January 19 to 21, 1995, to the Department of Education, Culture and Employment.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 13, tabling of documents. Mr. Patterson.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'll save this for petitions. Thank you.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 13, tabling of documents. Mr. Kakfwi.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

Stephen Kakfwi Sahtu

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table Tabled Document 124-12(7), public statement and resolutions passed during the 19th annual general meeting of the Native Women's Association of the Northwest Territories, which was held in Fort Norman, May 16, 17 and 18, 1995.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 13, tabling of documents. Mr. Patterson.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thanks, I'll try it again, Mr. Speaker. Thank you. I wish to table several documents, if I may. Tabled Document 125-12(7), an article from the June 5th edition of the Ottawa Citizen entitled, "Francophone Parents in NWT May Challenge School Act."

Secondly, Tabled Document 126-12(7), an article from the June 5th edition of the Winnipeg Free Press entitled, "French Rights Fight Vowed."

Thirdly, Mr. Speaker, Tabled Document 127-12(7), a news release in French and English, dated June 2, 1995, from the National Commission for Francophone Parents.

Fourthly, Tabled Document 128-12(7), a news release dated May 31, 1995 in French and English from the Iqaluit Parents' Committee. All these releases concern the new Education Act.

Finally, Mr. Speaker, in French and English, Tabled Document 129-12(7), a news release dated May 31, 1995 from La Federation Franco-TeNoise of the Northwest Territories. Again, concerning the new Education Act. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Item 13: Tabling Of Documents
Item 13: Tabling Of Documents

Page 1295

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 13, tabling of documents. Item 14, notices of motion. Item 15, notices of motions for first reading of bills. Item 16, motions. Item 17, first reading of bills. Item 18, second reading of bills. Item 19, consideration in committee of the whole of bills and other matters: Committee Report 11-12(7), Report on the Review of Bill 25 - The Education Act; Bill 26, An Act to Amend the Jury Act; and, Bill 32, An Act to Amend the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act, No. 2, with Mr. Whitford in the chair.

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

Good afternoon. The committee will come to order. What is the wish of the committee? Member for Yellowknife Frame Lake.

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I would like to recommend the committee continue consideration of Bill 32, followed by consideration of Committee Report 11-12(7) and Bill 25.

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

I'm sorry, Mr. Dent, did you say Bill 25? Could you just say that over again?

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Mr. Chairman, I would like to recommend that we deal first with Bill 32, followed by Committee Report 11-12(7) and then Bill 25.

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

Does the committee agree?

Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you. The order will be as stated by Mr. Dent, after a short break.

---SHORT RECESS

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

The committee will come back to order. The sponsor of the bill is here, Mr. Dent. When we concluded, we were dealing with clause 2 of the bill. Mr. Dent, do you wish to take the witness table?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Yes, Mr. Chairman, I would like to have legal counsel available.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1295

The Chair Tony Whitford

Okay, we will see if we can provide that for you. Mr. Dent, you may take the witness table, seat, area, dock, all those other nouns.

Mr. Dent, would you be so kind as to introduce your witness to the committee?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. With me today is Ms. Sheila MacPherson, who is Law Clerk of the Assembly.

Clause By Clause

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Was. Thank you, Mr. Dent. It's good to see you again, Ms. MacPherson. Clause 2. The chair recognizes the Member for Thebacha, Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Just to follow up on some of the comments from yesterday's discussion, I would like to know whether it's possible for Mr. Dent to clarify and be specific with regard to giving explanations or, possibly, examples with respect to the definition in his bill of "attempted" and the definition of "threatened" in clause 2.(b). Thank you.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mrs. Marie-Jewell. Mr. Dent.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I believe the Member for Thebacha is asking for a legal definition so I would ask if Ms. MacPherson could answer.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Dent. Ms. MacPherson.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Macpherson

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. With respect to the issue of "attempt," the law focuses on looking at whether there is an action by a person which could reasonably be interpreted as indicating an intention to assault somebody else, an action which an ordinary person might reasonably construe as indicating an intention to carry through with an assault. For example, if a person were to strike at another person but miss them because they lost their footing, that would be an attempted assault because it is reasonable to assume that, but for the fact that they lost their footing, they would have carried out the assault.

Whereas if a person were behind bars, for example, and made a threatening gesture to another person, because they are behind bars, it is not reasonable to assume that they would have the means to carry out their assault so that would not be an assault. There has to be an element of reasonableness. The ordinary person has to reasonably construe that there is an intention to assault and the ability to carry through with that assault, for there to be an attempted assault.

In terms of threats, threats usually involve a situation where there isn't a physical action, but just the use of words threatening violence. Again, the issue is would the reasonable person have construed the words as being threatened. Whether a statement constitutes a threat would depend on what the words were, the context in which the statements were made, and the likely impact of the words on the recipient. Certain words might be more accepted in one context than in another context. So in terms of determining whether a statement is a threatening statement, the court will examine all of those different factors. I hope that assists the committee, Mr. Chairman.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Ms. MacPherson. Clause 2. Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Further to that, Mr. Chairman, I'm wondering whether or not Mr. Dent has determined if there is any case law which influenced him to use the words "attempt" and "threatened" in his bill?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mrs. Marie-Jewell. Mr. Dent.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, in drafting the wording of the bill, I sought legal counsel to ensure that the bill would have some understanding if it were ever taken to court. Therefore, I would like to ask again that legal counsel be permitted to address the specifics of this question.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Dent. Ms. MacPherson.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Macpherson

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The wording used in the bill is very, very similar to the wording used in the Criminal Code because of the fact that there is a significant body of case law interpreting the wording used: "attempt" or "threatening to use violence." It was felt that that was the best place to draw the wording from. There is a tremendous amount of case law dealing with the area of firearms prohibition and the wording contained in the bill is taken directly from that section. So I can advise the Member that there are many cases and a relatively clear understanding of those words, in terms of words being traditionally considered. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Ms. MacPherson. Mrs. Marie-Jewell.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Jeannie Marie-Jewell Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I think it's important to have on record the definition and interpretation of this bill, where it is developed from, with respect to the words "attempted" and "threatened" because they can be misinterpreted in the future in the court process. I think it's very important for the public to understand clearly the meaning of the bill when those words will be interpreted for future reference. With that, I have no further comments. Thank you.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mrs. Marie-Jewell. Clause 2. Mr. Koe.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Fred Koe Inuvik

Thank you. Under clause 2.6.(2), the words "practices of parliament" are used. Can someone explain why that particular phrase is in this particular act? We're dealing with an act relating to the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories. Why would we use the practices of Parliament, and I assume that's the Canadian Parliament?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Koe. Ms. Stewart.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1296

Acting Law Clerk Ms. Stewart

The Constitution Act of 1867 provides that Canada shall have a constitution similar in principle to that of the United Kingdom. A constitution similar in principle to that of the United Kingdom is one founded on a parliamentary democracy. Parliament, as part of that parliamentary democracy, has a number of privileges, rights and powers, as well as procedures and other conventions that

govern their proceedings and manner of acting in different circumstances.

The words "practices of Parliament" were intended to capture not only things that were set out in the rules and procedures of the Legislative Assembly, not only things that were included in the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act or conventions of this Legislative Assembly, but also to include all those other privileges of a Parliament in a parliamentary democracy.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Ms. Stewart. Mr. Koe.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Fred Koe Inuvik

Similarly, the last part of that section reads "or otherwise." What are other examples that fit under this category, or why is that qualification there?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Koe. Ms. Stewart.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Acting Law Clerk Ms. Stewart

I would request that we defer that to Mr. Dent. I wasn't involved in the drafting of that particular provision or the drafting, at all, of the bill and I'm not entirely sure what was intended.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you for your suggestion, Ms. Stewart. Mr. Dent.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Mr. Chairman, the phrasing of this clause was actually suggested by Mr. Miles Pepper of the GNWT Department of Justice. He is the assistant deputy minister. My understanding of the reasoning for this wording is to ensure that there is no truncation of the rights and powers which are inherent in this Legislature. If we are not careful, we could in fact limit the rights of the Legislature with an act when we codify responses to certain actions. With this wording, we have been assured that we are not in any way infringing on the inherent rights of the Legislature.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Dent. Clause 2.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you. Bill as a whole.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you. Does the committee agree that Bill 32 is ready for third reading?

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you. Bill 32 is now ready for third reading. Mr. Dent, I would like to thank you for assisting the committee in this effort, and Ms. MacPherson, we look forward to seeing you back.

---Applause

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1297

The Chair Tony Whitford

I would like to thank Ms. Stewart for assisting the committee in its deliberations on Bill 32. Thank you, Ms. Stewart, and we hope to see you again.

Bill 32: An Act To Amend The Legislative Assembly And Executive Council Act, No. 2
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair Charles Dent

The next item on the agenda is Committee Report 11-12(7), Report on the Review of Bill 25 - The Education Act. Is the chair of the Standing Committee on Legislation prepared to make introductory comments?

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Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Yes, the Standing Committee on Legislation read its report into the record on June 8th, and in our report we had a number of recommendations. I would like to begin by reintroducing the recommendations.

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The Chair Charles Dent

Before we get into the motions, perhaps we should ask for general comments on the committee report from the chairman of the Standing Committee on Legislation. Are there any general comments on the report of the standing committee on their report of Bill 25, Education Act. Are there any general comments? Mr. Patterson.

General Comments

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I would like to commend the committee for the good work it did in consulting with regions of the Northwest Territories. I was quite impressed with the manner in which consultations were undertaken in my constituency.

In particular, I was delighted that the committee responded to a request from students to consult with students by taking the trouble to make a special visit to the school the day after the hearings, where I think we had a very lively session about the new bill and got some good advice from students particularly on student discipline matters.

I would also like to say that since the committee began its hearings, I believe, in the territories in my constituency, there has been an awful lot of changes made to the bill. Of course, I should certainly give some credit to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment and his staff, but I do believe the committee also deserves significant credit for having encouraged substantial amendments and, I think everyone would agree, significant improvements to the bill. So I want to commend the committee for the progress that has been made.

One of the most astonishing accomplishments of this committee is the agreement that was reached, unprecedented in the history of the Northwest Territories as far as I know, that regulations drafted pursuant to the act would not be finalized until affected groups had been consulted. I think that was one of the major criticisms of the bill, and, to me, it's remarkable that this major amendment was made which will basically change the way we do business in the Northwest Territories, at least as far as education regulations are concerned. I suspect this amendment may also affect and set precedents for other bills that may be brought to future Legislatures, recognizing that regulations are often a very critical way of describing the rules by which people must govern themselves in the territories.

I am not totally convinced that this is the right way to go because the problem with the consultation on the regulations is that there is no guarantee that those groups consulted with will be satisfied. It will also certainly delay the implementation of the new act, and I think the department has taken upon itself quite a staggering responsibility if it's to take this requirement of consultation on the regulations as seriously as most people would like it to be taken.

I think, for me, the jury is still out as to whether this will work. I understand the argument that flexibility has to be built in to the act and that it can be done best through the regulatory regime, but I want to point out that this is a significant departure from the approach we have taken to regulation-making up till now, and it will be very interesting to see just how it works.

I do want to say that this has eased a lot of the concerns that I expressed in my intervention about not knowing what the regime is actually going to be. Now at least we'll have a chance to see the draft regulations and comment on those. I would also like to point out, Mr. Chairman, that one of the major issues which had to do with the choice of language of instruction by communities has been dealt with, in my view, satisfactorily, with the bill as amended. Again, I think the committee is to be commended for having encouraged the Minister and his staff to fix that problem up.

Another area that was of great controversy and concern in my constituency had to do with religious education. I believe that the provision that is now in the bill may somewhat ease the concerns that had been expressed about disrupting the current practice in many communities in the Northwest Territories. I think the relevant provision has been softened and should perhaps pose less of a threat to existing programs of religious instruction that are in place in the schools in the Northwest Territories.

I want to commend the committee and the department for those and many other changes; I know there have been over 80 amendments. I haven't been able to participate in every day of the committee's deliberation, even though I was accused yesterday of hanging around the committee. Unfortunately, I wasn't able to hang around for all the good stuff. I know this represents a lot of work and a lot of compromise -- and I think politics is the art of compromise -- and I'm delighted to see that so much compromise has occurred.

However, I must say, Mr. Chairman, in my general comments that I have not seen very much willingness to compromise and reach out to the Francophone groups in the Northwest Territories concerned about French language education rights under the Charter of Rights. It's been an exercise in frustration for my constituents and for myself. I recognize and respect that the committee says in its report that they are now satisfied as a result of legal opinions the committee received that the bill, as amended, addresses the requirements of section 23 of the Charter.

My problem, Mr. Chairman, as an ordinary Member is that I haven't been able to see any of these legal opinions. I've been told that they are privileged, that they are confidential advice given to the government, that they may... it's like a lawyer's advice to his client in contemplation of litigation and that I have no right to see these opinions. Since they were prepared at public expense and with lawyers on the public payroll, I would have hoped that there might have been some way found to make these opinions available to Members of the Francophone community who I know desperately wanted to see them to be satisfied that their fears, perhaps, had been dealt with by the bill but that has not been possible.

I know that the Minister himself has met with the associations and their representatives and there has been no resolution of their concerns. Mr. Chairman, I'm left with the dilemma of being told by the committee, we got legal opinions, everything's okay, there's no need to worry, the Charter provisions have been dealt with. Yet my constituents, Francophone groups in the city of Yellowknife and the territorial association, are all saying we're not satisfied.

Mr. Chairman, these parents and children especially, who want to receive education in their first language, they're a very small minority in the Northwest Territories. I am under no illusions that this is an issue in many constituencies in the Northwest Territories. However, I want to say that as a representative of a community that does have proportionally one of the largest Francophone populations in the territories, these rights are very important to my constituents. They've worked very hard to establish a first language French program in Nakasuk School in my constituency and they've worked alongside Inuit organizations and parents who are promoting the Inuktitut language and have achieved considerable success. I'm sure that Members of this Assembly would want to give them every respect the same as we give respect to aboriginal parents who want to see their children educated in their first language.

Mr. Chairman, I want to say that this is my main problem with the bill. Only today -- and I haven't even had a chance to send this across to my colleague, Mr. Nerysoo but I will do so now -- only today have I received a legal opinion, a copy of a legal opinion which has been prepared in draft by the counsel for the office of the Commissioner of Official Languages for Canada. We may not relish being told by Ottawa or by a federal government institution whether our bill meets the requirements of the Charter or not, but this opinion has been prepared by a lawyer, Mr. Richard Tardif, who works full time, I'm told, on section 23 across the country. The draft opinion, which I understand Mr. Tardif has authorized for public release, states that the bill as drafted does not meet the requirements of the Charter and spells out in detail why not.

Mr. Chairman, I know the Minister of Education has read all the cases, he's studied this aspect very closely himself, he's received legal advice from several lawyers, and I know the Minister is convinced that the bill is adequate and that anyone who says less should sue. Mr. Chairman, I'd rather not see that happen.

I think it would be very unfortunate if we couldn't solve this without resort to the courts. I want to, at the beginning of this debate, let Members know that I hope we can have a discussion while the bill is before the House about these problems, examine the independent views of the counsel for the office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, who I don't think anyone would say would be a person who would want to have an interest in taking sides in the Northwest Territories, and see whether some of the criticisms that were laid out in this legal opinion can be dealt with in a cooperative fashion while this bill is before this committee.

I have reviewed the opinion and believe that the bill has to only go a little further towards meeting the concerns that are identified in the opinion. I think it goes some distance. I understand, Mr. Chairman, full well that a statute cannot be expected to spell out every detail of the school system that is being contemplated, but the point made in the opinion, and I won't get into it in detail as I'll have a chance to table it, share it with Members and discuss it in more detail when we get to those sections, but the point made in the legal opinion is that the essential framework for governance has to be spelled out in the bill and cannot be left to regulations. So the structure necessary to guarantee the exercise of constitutional rights to instruction should not be left in the hands of the Minister or in the hands of regulations.

So, Mr. Chairman, I don't want to belabour this one. Generally, I'm positive about the progress that's been made on this bill, and many of the concerns have been dealt with.

I have to say, though, Mr. Chairman, there's one area that I think we need to still work on. We have three or four days now to devote to this bill. I hope the Minister will take the constructive criticisms that I've made here today and the advice offered in this opinion in a positive manner, and look at a way of perhaps making a few more changes. I know some have already been made, but perhaps look at a way of making a few more changes so we can all leave this Chamber as one happy family and say we've dealt with the aboriginal language issues, we've dealt with the concern about the consultation on the regulations, we've dealt with concerns about religious instruction, we've dealt with concerns raised by divisional boards, and the Francophone parents -- the few there are in the Northwest Territories -- are not going to be threatening that the only way they can get their rights recognized is by litigation.

It's a big order, but, hopefully, we can make everyone happy and deal with this bill in a constructive manner and make the final polishing touches so that it will reach out to everyone. I have to say that I've tabled some press clippings today; whether we like it or not, this issue of French language minority rights is a very volatile issue in the country. I think we have to be concerned if the Commissioner of Official Languages' legal counsel says the bill doesn't quite hit the mark, and if the Commissioner of Official Languages is writing our Minister saying if legal proceedings are revived, I will have to give serious consideration to seeking leave from the court to intervene. We don't need this problem, Mr. Chairman, with all the issues that are facing us with the Government of Canada. Let's try to fix it up here in this committee, so that we don't have to draw national attention to ourselves by appearing in any way to be trampling on the constitutional rights of a minority.

That's my concern, Mr. Chairman. I hope in the next few days we can deal with these problems in a spirit of goodwill and not defensiveness. I have an open mind, I'm very anxious to hear the Minister's views on some of the concerns that I'm going to dare to express on behalf of my constituents. I hope that he won't take my criticism personally. It's not intended in any way to be a personal criticism or to indicate a lack of respect for the Minister, but I feel that I have a duty to my constituents to raise these issues. So that is the one problem I have with this bill, Mr. Chairman, but I'm optimistic that we can deal with it with goodwill. Thank you.

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The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you, Mr. Patterson. General comments on the committee report. Mr. Lewis.

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Brian Lewis Yellowknife Centre

Thanks, Mr. Chairman. I mentioned previously in this Assembly that I can recall vividly when the Education Act, which we now operate with, went through this Assembly in February of 1977. The difference between the process that led to it in those days and what has transpired over the last several years has been the way in which consultation has taken place. I recall that in 1976, the then Commissioner took it upon himself to take the Education Act around the territories to hold meetings. So what you had was a federal bureaucrat who went around and tried to get public input. I remember him reading into the record what all the communities had said about the act and so on.

So this has been a completely different process where there has been tremendous consultation with the public over a long period of time; several years. It's gone through our House, it's gone through committees, it's a completely different way in arriving at a piece of legislation.

The kinds of issues that were controversial at that time, though, are still with us. The major controversy in 1977, Mr. Chairman, was whether this government, in fact, had the legitimate right to establish an education system with its own act, as a territorial government. There were several interventions by many aboriginal people who said this government shouldn't even be dealing with this, this is a federal responsibility. There were special concerns about treaty rights and so on and constitutional rights, and it's been a controversial issue ever since that time. In fact, every Minister who I can recall has attempted to find out on what basis this government really implements education programs. What is the legal basis for it? Where is the document that says that this government should be responsible for education? A lot of time and energy has gone into trying to find some piece of paper as a directive from some Minister of DIAND to indicate that this transfer has officially taken place and this is the legitimate place for that activity to occur.

I don't think that that's any longer the fiery controversial issue it was when Mr. Erasmus was the president of the Dene Nation, because things have changed enormously over the last 20 years. The biggest change, of course, is the way in which we develop our legislation involving many, many sectors of the public who have a chance to express their opinions, and we can make accommodations. So there is tremendous consultation that takes place now, so that people's concerns can be addressed.

The two major ones, though, that were referred to in the committee, and I'm sure that they also were raised to the Minister, was the fact that there is nothing in the preamble specifically relating to treaty rights. I know there was some discussion about finding some way of honouring those or recognizing those, but it's very difficult when you don't know specifically how to translate some of those early treaty obligations into modern legislation.

The same thing relates to the collective rights of Francophones who, under our Constitution, have certain rights. This act goes some way towards addressing those concerns, but there are some questions that our Francophone friends have suggested need to be addressed. If there is one thing you expect from a piece of legislation, it's certainty; some degree of certainty as to what transpired under this legislation.

So one of the major concerns that I've heard expressed, and it's certainly been expressed to the committee, is that things still seem to be open for negotiations or open for further consultation. For that reason, some people feel uneasy because there is a certain certainty lacking in several clauses in the bill.

I know that one of the concerns that has been raised is the issue of school days. When you look at our act, although there is a promise to include in the regulations some reference to the exposure the children will get to the instruction program, there is nothing in there that tells you how long a student is going to be in a classroom. That's a source of concern because one of the other issues that was raised in a lot of the public hearings was standards. Standards was right up front. We want to have standards that are comparable to what other parents expect throughout Canada, and if you can't even specify in your act how many days a student is going to school so that you can compare and see what we do compared with other jurisdictions, then that's one place where parents will look and say, we don't even have an act that tells us how many days our kids are going to have to go to school. It's not there. That is one criteria, one little thing that you can look at to say this is what do they do in this place or this is what do they do in that place. It makes it very difficult for parents, if it's not up front, to see that spelled out in the law; although, I recognize that the Minister has said, well, we are going to consult further before we pin that down.

I was pleased to see that the department has shown a tremendous willingness to be flexible on many issues and on the issue of inclusive schooling where our jurisdiction has shown leadership, I think, right across the country. They recognize that they are only words if you just say, it's inclusive but we'll do our best and so on. There is some kind of obligation, I think, that is being made by the government to make sure that these are more than words and that there will be an act which recognizes that there is a new way of dealing with the total school population and not to have some children excluded from it so that they end up suffering, if you like, because they are not allowed to take advantage of programs in the same way that other students do so.

There also were concerns raised by students that they are not really that involved and they would like to be more involved. I think that the request to be full-fledged members of councils and other education bodies is probably farther than the Legislature would be prepared to go simply because, although as a client of the system you would like to be involved in the governance, then it becomes very difficult. Since there is a way in which any member of the public can be officially elected to a body like that, I think that they would have to be satisfied with the same kind of role that the principal or teacher has where you can be an ex-officio member of a school board so that your point of view or the office that you hold or the position that you hold in the system can be represented to that board.

In 1977, Mr. Chairman, the major emotional issue was that there was compulsory schooling and the fact that many parents were upset with the idea of fines. If you didn't send your children to school, you would be fined. That was the hottest issue in the whole debate because there were some people who said, why should we send our kids to a school system that we don't agree with. It's not our system, so why should you be fining us for not sending our kids to a system which is really not of our manufacture or design? We were never involved in it and not consulted much about it, and yet you want to fine us for not sending our kids.

What happened, of course, was that the act went through leaving the compulsory education clause in there but with no specification of penalties if you never did it. So we lived with an act which had a clause in it but had no teeth to enforce it, and that existed for quite a period of time.

The controversial issue this time was not whether people should be fined or not for non-compliance but the fact that if you are going to fine people for not complying with the act on the basis that you are not attending school, somehow the funds should be reverted or transferred to the local education body. That was an opinion that was expressed in some places. It's possible that some mechanism could be found in which, if you are going to fine people, some bookkeeping way could eventually be worked out so that those monies could be used locally.

There are two other issues that I have noted, Mr. Chairman. One of them that I am pleased with is the fact that there was tremendous debate and discussion on whether we should have more or less religion and spirituality in our school system. We all recognize that there is a Charter requirement that schools can't be used to evangelize people, to push young people in this direction or that direction on religious questions. I believe that the department did come up with a compromise eventually which will allow people to recognize that if there's anything that matters in a school system, it's those values that really guide us and if you don't find some mechanism whereby young people could be exposed to spiritual questions, the basic questions of human life, then really it's not much of a school system. I think that the government went a long way to giving people some comfort that we would have a school system which did recognize that those things that have deep meaning for people should find some place in the school system.

I have some concern about a proposal or plan to recertify teachers. I have gone along with it so I am not making a minority report to this committee. I have gone along with it, but I do have some concerns about recertification.

I know that in the past all kinds of ways have been devised or attempts have been made to release teachers from the system who are not easy to release because the whole area of labour relations is very difficult in many jurisdictions and especially in ours, as it relates to professional people. I really seriously wonder whether this is one other ploy, if you like...And I use that word, I suppose, unadvisedly because it suggests that it's been a deeply-thought-out subterfuge to circumvent some difficulties that you can't solve in the normal course of events. But I could see recertification, if it's not done right, being used as some method of simply getting rid of a person. What you do is just don't give them a certificate and then he can't work anymore and he or she has no job.

So, to me, I agree with the principle that if you are a professional, you should make sure that you keep up with your trade, that you keep up with your business, that you go back to school, that you take the kinds of programs that will put you on the cutting edge of things and not rely upon stuff that you learned 30 years ago, like a person such as myself, for example, Mr. Chairman. I started out in 1958 as a school teacher, and I then took advantage of whatever was going on so I could keep abreast of things. But I haven't really been a school teacher since 1967. That's when I finished my teaching career in the territories. I did other work in education over a long period of time but I finished teaching in 1967, and I would feel completely inadequate if I wanted to and if anybody wanted me to go back to the classroom because things have changed so much over that period of time.

However, if we are serious about this recertification, it should be made clear to the individual that these are the requirements that you have to meet to be recertified. It's not just the whim of a bureaucrat or a Minister. I don't like you so you are not going to get a certificate anymore; that's it. There should be something specified that you have to do to bring yourself up to speed or up to date or whatever, and this should not be used as a mechanism simply to get rid of somebody that you can't find a legitimate way of getting rid of under our current regime. That's a fear I've always had, that you try to find some other mechanism to do things which you can't do under the normal course of events.

There are two other things that I've heard, Mr. Chairman, in my discussions on this bill, and I've thought about them at length, in fact. What we have is a bill which is a very large bill, but although it's so large, there are many things that are not specified, that are still open. It may be that what we have is a piece of legislation that is, I don't know, maybe a sign of doing things in a different way, that we have a different process of doing things in the territories, that our legislation will evolve differently.

But the two major issues that I've heard are the fact that, one, we don't have a clear division of powers between the levels of authority. That's supposed to be worked out over a period of time and it will be set in the regulations. But normally in an act of this nature, when you specify powers, then you always put in what those powers are, because the whole point of legislation is to give you certainty so you know exactly just by looking at the act exactly what the powers are that you are expected to exercise. So the idea that you can negotiate, and so on, is in the act. It is implicit, I suppose, that there will be lots of things worked out through consultation. But it does get people used to a different kind of legislation, where things are spelled out. There is some cause for concern because this legislation is unlike any other legislation I've looked at. So much seems to be open. Maybe that's the way things have to be, and far bigger brains than us have said the only way to deal with this subject is to give people a bit of room.

But the idea of not having division of powers, not specifying the number of school days...I'll tell you why people of my generation find it unusual that you're not prepared to spell out the number of days in which a child would go to school. In the old days, and I'll only hark back to this once, we were always told that the register of the enrolment was a legal document. It told you where a child was supposed to be on any one day, and it would be used by the police, courts or whatever to indicate that the school was in session on these days and that's where the child was supposed to be. This is what we got from Justice in the old federal days. We understood that it was a legal document and in it, you spelled out all the days in which the school is in session and you would know, then, where that person is.

It is going to be more difficult if you're not prepared to specify days, the number of days when school is going to be in session. Maybe you've already thought ahead to redesigning the instruments for recording instruction, maybe the register is obsolete now, maybe there is a different method or system of keeping track of instruction. These are the types of technical things, no doubt, that the department has worked on to try to find some way of meeting their obligations to make sure the students get the right exposure to instruction that they should have. I know that if any parent looks at the system, they would find it unusual if you don't put a minimum of days in which a child is expected to be in school.

I know the arguments have been heard throughout the territories about flexibility. There are two words that seem to characterize this act: flexibility and negotiations. There should either be flexibility, so you could do the things you want to do so you won't be boxed in by some inflexible instrument that prevents you from doing what makes sense to you. The other thing is negotiation, that you can negotiate things, and you can petition the Minister.

Those are the concerns I heard, Mr. Chairman, but I congratulate the Minister and the department for having gone about this in the right way. This is the way in which an act should be done. There has been a tremendous amount of consultation over a long period of time, not rushed -- it may seem rushed not because we have so much work ahead of us still -- and a tremendous amount of effort has gone into doing the work. There has been consultation like, I believe, has never happened before in creating a very important piece of legislation.

We've all agreed that education is still one of the chief instruments of our social and economic development. If we get a good act, then of course we will have achieved something of major significance in this Assembly, through the good will of the committees and the government. With that, Mr. Chairman, I will leave it. I would like to say that this is where I began my career, as a school teacher, and also in the department, being much involved in the last act, and I'm quite happy to be involved with this piece of legislation too, which is close to the hearts of many of the people of the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

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The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you, Mr. Lewis. Are there any further general comments on the committee report? Mr. Koe.

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Fred Koe Inuvik

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. As other Members have mentioned, a lot of work has gone into this bill to get to this stage, where the committee has reviewed the proposed bill under consultation. This is after several years of work by the department after their consultation. Once we finish dealing with the committee report, we will be getting into the bill, itself. There are a lot of clauses in the bill and each raise different issues.

I've been very supportive, in terms of working on the new act, and have followed the progress through all the different documents that have been prepared by the department that have gone out for people's input and comments. I would have to say that I think the review process has gone fairly well. It has not been perfect; any consultation process we have in the north takes a lot of effort and work to ensure that people have access to the documentation and are able to have a mechanism to voice their concerns on new proposed legislation.

It's not the sexiest thing to read. When you're in a community and get a piece of legislation, people tend to put it aside and not pay much attention to it. I find that this is the case now. The act is a fairly thick document, there are 160 some odd clauses in it. People tend to leave it to somebody else and we're the "somebody elses" because it is now up to us to deliberate and ensure that what we approve in this Assembly is going to be appropriate for all the residents of the north and for an education system that people have been saying they want.

I think the whole education system has been criticized in terms of excellence in education, the quality of education, the types of schools, the hours, everything that's in the act, the teachers, the roles of parents, teachers, students, principals, superintendents, community councils and boards. All of these have been addressed in this new act.

The committee went across the north and heard a lot of presentations. I was pleased with the committee meetings that followed where a lot of the changes, I think over 40 new amendments, were made, adopting a lot of the concerns raised by people across the Northwest Territories.

There are still issues that the committee raised in their report, and issues that I, and I assume other Members, will be bringing up when we get into the details of the bill. But at this time, I would like to just comment on some of the issues so that people are aware where the concerns I will be raising are going to come up when we deal with the particular clauses.

In the preamble, the whole issue of recognizing rights and freedoms of aboriginal people, and the treaty rights and aboriginal rights is an area that still has to be addressed. I know that this act is not the vehicle to address and define what these are, but education is one aspect that treaty people, particularly in the new land claims agreement, are very concerned about. It is one that we still feel that there's a fiduciary responsibility from the federal government to provide for the right of education for status Indians and Inuit people; a right to have free education, not only up to grade 12, but post-secondary education.

When we get the particular sections, the issue is going to be do the clauses in the preamble cover the new land claim agreements and any land claim agreements that are to follow. Does section 35 of the Constitution Act cover the Gwich'in claim, does it cover the Inuvialuit claim, does it cover the Nunavut Act, does it cover the Sahtu claim and the respective provisions in those acts? They have to be protected and recognized somewhere, and the only place I feel that it should be is in the preamble. So when it comes to discussing that particular section of the act, I'll be raising that particular issue.

Quality in standards; we put a lot of people in our schools, we're graduating a lot of people, but you have to raise the question of the whole principle of excellence and quality. Where are our people going once they come out of our school systems and what are they doing? These are things that are of concern.

The issue of equal rights; the report makes mention of it and it makes mention of section 15, but the Native Women's Society of the NWT raised the issue in their presentation that it has to be front and centre in the act and has to be a theme that overrides the act. It's the same with the issue of violence in our society.

The issue that the committee mentioned on hours or days of instruction; we'll get into some discussion when we talk about the recommendation. I'm of the opinion that we should quantify the number of instructional hours that we expect our schools to provide, and it's up to each education district to convert that to numbers of days or numbers of hours in a day; whether it be four and a half, five, five and a quarter, or whatever, to fit their program.

One more comment on the whole issue of treaty rights and choice of education. The committee report made mention of it on page 10, that it was difficult, and I know the dilemma that the Minister has in trying to define these treaty rights or aboriginal rights in this act. To try to include it would imply a resolution and definition of these rights, which is not the case because every day there are different negotiations that take place; different definitions and different arrangements or agreements are made. I guess the point is that it's incumbent on this government and the federal government to try to get those resolved. I guess that's the issue. We have to keep bringing it out on the table so that it gets addressed and that we are able to facilitate discussions between the groups so we can get appropriate definitions of these issues.

The area of parents' responsibilities; again, the committee is making a recommendation of parent advisory committees. I agree with that, but the comment I would like to make is that we're finally putting in the act a section on rules and responsibilities of parents. I think we've just touched the surface of that area, and I'm not sure how we can make it stronger. But the whole area of parents' involvement in the schools is key. Not only in the schools, but in all the school activities, camp-outs, sports activities, tutoring and whatever activities go on in school, I think the parents have a responsibility to get back into that area where I think they've moved away from. Years ago, the teachers and the parents used to share a lot of these responsibilities and chaperone dances and chaperone sport trips and other activities, coach teams and do all the dancing clubs, debating clubs, chess clubs, things like that. So we have to somehow encourage people to get involved into our schools again.

The area of education staff is an issue my colleague from Yellowknife Centre raised; the recertification of teachers. Again, the act is very clear, and the committee heard clearly that if we're going to strive for excellence in our schools, then we have to strive for excellence in our instructors, in our teachers. The way to do that is to ensure that they are qualified, ensure that they are certified to teach, and that they have to keep up to date with the changing times and the changing materials that they use for teaching. I think the phrase today is "active learning," and there are new teaching mechanisms for doing those things. I think the act has now touched that, and I fully support that.

The whole area of culture and language and spirituality and religion is another area that is quite contentious and I think the majority of the comments we heard across the north were related to these areas. We have to protect, encourage and enhance our aboriginal languages, all our official languages in the Northwest Territories. We have to encourage as much as possible the development of the curriculums, use of these curriculums and use of the materials -- develop materials so people can use them. One of the recommendations that's been made, again, I fully support.

The whole area of spirituality and religion, I know there's concerns about the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the limitations that puts on but I truly believe that we have to have the option of being able to teach religion in our schools. However that's provided for, I think we have to leave that option open. I fully support not only religion but spirituality, native spirituality in particular, where people have to have the freedom to believe and practice spiritual beliefs and values.

The other area of concern, and one that I'll be making comments on when we get to the particular clauses is the areas which define the powers, responsibilities and authorities of the education bodies, the district education authorities and the divisional education councils, so that once the act is passed -- and I know there's a lot of work to be done, but the regulations which I assume will set some guidelines in how this is done; that whole process of negotiating the division of powers and responsibilities between the various councils and education bodies -- people will have to understand and know what their authorities are in terms of how it's done and we don't want to have to always talk about who does what and have a big argument...We don't want a series of court challenges over these things. People in communities have to have the authorities and powers and they give that to their district education authority who represents them. We have to know what and how they're able to negotiate in a bigger arena which is the divisional education council.

In line with that also, division of powers and responsibilities and authorities of the Minister. I know there have been considerable adjustments made on the roles of the Minister in the act; a lot of amendments to reduce that but it's still an area that has a lot of impact in a lot of the clauses in the act. The Minister, in terms of dealing with regulations, has made a commitment and it's in the act that consultation will happen in terms of developing the regulations. I just want to say that I'm pleased that's in there but we have to ensure that it happens. We just can't put it in the act and say, yes, the Minister's agreed and then that's it. It's incumbent on all of us and all the education authorities across the north to ensure that they participate actively in developing the regulations.

With that, I want to thank the committee for the work that they've done and thank the committee for allowing me, as an alternate Member, to participate in the activities dealing with the act. It's a good one, there's been a lot of work done, but in the next several days I hope we consider very carefully the provisions that we're looking at approving because it's going to be for however long -- 10, 15, 20 years -- the act has to be in place, so we've got to ensure that what we approve, what we agree on this week, is going to stand the test of time. Thank you very much.

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1303

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. General comments. The Member for Aivilik.

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1303

Manitok Thompson Aivilik

I just wanted to make a general comment on this Education Act about the concerns that have been raised from my constituency and also from the Keewatin over the years with regard to local programs and that is cultural programs being taught in the school, whether it's sewing programs or hunting programs.

In the Education Act there's a clause that qualified teachers will be hired and that no un qualified teachers will be allowed to work in the schools. I know there's a clause that says for less than 20 days you can have a unqualified staff to teach the students. In the communities there's always been a real concern with local program instructors being hired to teach the traditional skills in the schools. The people that are usually hired are elders from the community. They don't have teaching skills, they have never gone through the school system and they are given 15 or 20 students to teach at once. It is very confusing for them to teach a project, whether it be harpoon making or sewing kamiks.

I think there should be a program to teach these local program instructors or to certify them so that they can deliver the programs within a classroom structure because the way they were taught originally was on an individual basis. They have all the knowledge and skills to teach inside their brains, but they don't know how to deliver them to a class of 15 or 20 kids. If they are going to look at qualified teachers I think they should also look at certifying local program instructors and coming up with a program similar to the teacher education program, just geared towards local program instructors. That has been a concern for a long time.

I'm not saying that they are not educated enough to teach school kids. I'm just saying that the way that they were taught when they were growing up, most of these local program instructors are people who have not gone through the school system. They are elders coming into the schools to teach the local programs. They don't have the skills to teach a whole class of kids or even to do report cards.

I have often wondered, instead of letting them teach a whole bunch of kids in a regular classroom setting, if it wouldn't be better to contract them out to teach a specific skill such as to teach sealskin kamik making and just contracting it out to a person who is skilled in that area to have a better quality program. Instead of hiring one person, and you're expecting that local program instructor to teach all subjects in the Inuit culture, when he might just be skilled in trapping, or when he might just be skilled in parka making.

I know that has been a concern in the Inuit communities, as to how we can best deliver local programs in our schools when there is no teacher education program or local instructors program to certify these instructors so they are teaching the same quality programs as the teachers next door with all their curriculums.

Another concern has been school reviews. I've often felt that the schools should be reviewed every four years, all the programs in the schools; a review team could just come in and review the whole system to see if they're teaching grade 8 to the grade 8 students, or if they are teaching grade 4 to the grade 8 students, or if they are doing their yearly plans or daily plans; just reviewing the whole system. I think that has to be investigated in the Education department -- these school reviews -- on an ongoing basis, so that our teachers are meeting the needs of the students and that they're teaching quality programs.

In clause 61, it talks about the teachers being transferred to another community. Does that mean that the CECs don't have any more power to hire their own teachers, that they're just being given transfers from one community to another community? That was another concern.

Also, there's a clause in the Education Act about if your school is not providing 10, 11 and 12, then the Minister can pay for accommodation for that student to go to school and take those grades in another community. In the smaller communities with grade extensions, some parents are wondering if they can have the choice to send their students out of their communities to get a quality program because the schools that have extended grades were not built to accommodate quality education programs; they are too small. The parents are having a hard time. They like their students to stay home and attend grades 10, 11 and 12 and succeed, but they don't have much choice when they don't have any room. The teachers who are teaching those grades don't have enough room or enough resources in the smaller schools to teach quality programs to those students. With the clause where it says the Minister can only pay for students' accommodation in another community if the grades are not provided in their communities, the parents are concerned with that. If they want a quality program that might be provided in a bigger school, they would have to pay for their students to stay in another community with that grade. The small communities that are trying to provide grade extensions feel that they're not providing a good enough program because when the smaller schools were built in the communities, it wasn't planned very well to accommodate high school programs. With the community high school programs happening, it's a very good idea. It's a great idea, and a lot of parents are happy with keeping their high school kids at home and succeeding, graduating, but their concern has been that the schools were built without extending grades.

Many times in the smaller communities, teachers have had to teach all the subjects in a computer room when it was intended

for computer programs. There's a shortage of resources and rooms for those grades.

The other concern over the years is that a lot of the parents have not gone through the system in order to go with their children to the high school and understand which programs their children should take, because they don't really know the difference yet between academic programs and general programs. I think that will be a hindrance in our future as Inuit because our parents have to be exposed to the whole system of education so that they can support their children going to high school and give them the right choice with the right courses and going into academic programs, so that in the future we can have the qualified teachers and qualified lawyers or doctors we want.

But right now, most of the students are making their own decisions as to which courses they want to take, because their parents are not aware of different programs in the high school. So it's usually up to the Inuit students to decide which way to go, and a lot of our Inuit students are going into general programs and just graduating with a general diploma. The parents think they've gone through high school and find out that their children cannot qualify for certain university programs because of the choice they made on their own. That has been a real hindrance in education.

I think there has to be more public consultation with the parents on high school programming. I know most of the parents in the smaller communities support community programs. They are very happy with the community programs providing grades 10, 11 and 12, but do they realize that it's mostly general programs because the schools are too small to accommodate quality academic programs that we need for the future of Nunavut.

I guess those are the general comments that I wanted to make today. Tima. Thank you.

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1304

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you very much. I've noticed that several committee Members have started making comments that relate not only to the committee report, but also to the bill itself, Bill 25. I was wondering if it might not be advisable at this point in time to ask the committee chair to take us through the motions that are contained in the committee report, and perhaps then ask the Minister to give his opening comments on the bill itself. Then we could resume with general comments on both the committee report and Bill 25. Mr. Pudlat has indicated his interest in speaking, so we'll make sure that Mr. Pudlat is first on the list after we get through those two items, if the committee agrees.

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1304

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1304

The Chair Charles Dent

Mr. Whitford.

Committee Report 11-12(7): Report On The Review Of Bill 25 - The Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1304

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. The committee has five recommendations that it would like to make into formal motions. I would like to go through those motions at this time.

Committee Motion 62-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 1, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1304

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Mr. Chairman, with your concurrence, I move that this committee recommends that a clause be included in the proposed act which would clearly lay out the total annual instructional days for kindergarten, grades 1 to 6, and grades 7 to 12.

Committee Motion 62-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 1, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 62-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 1, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

An Hon. Member

Question.

Committee Motion 62-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 1, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Question has been called, but I don't recognize a quorum. I will ring the bells.

Okay, I recognize a quorum now. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Whitford.

Committee Motion 63-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 2, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you. Mr. Chairman, I move that this committee recommends that the government evaluate the formula funding provided for inclusive schooling and the processes used by education bodies for allocating this funding among students, taking into consideration the inclusive schooling policy.

Committee Motion 63-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 2, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 63-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 2, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

An Hon. Member

Question.

Committee Motion 63-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 2, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion is carried.

---Carried

The motion is carried. Mr. Whitford.

Committee Motion 64-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 3, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, I move that this committee recommends that a phrase be added to the bill to specifically allow for and encourage the establishment of a parent advisory committee in each school.

Committee Motion 64-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 3, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 64-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 3, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

An Hon. Member

Question.

Committee Motion 64-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 3, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Whitford.

Committee Motion 65-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 4, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, recommendation number 4. I move that this committee recommends that the Department of Education, Culture and Employment review this suggestion to determine if there is an effective and economical way of returning fine revenues to the education body which generates those revenues.

Committee Motion 65-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 4, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 65-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 4, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

An Hon. Member

Question.

Committee Motion 65-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 4, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Whitford.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, the fifth and final recommendation. I move that this committee recommends that the Department of Education, Culture and Employment ensure adequate resources are available to ensure the development of curriculum, as required, in official languages of the Northwest Territories.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

An Hon. Member

Question.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Whitford, does that conclude the motions from the committee?

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Yes, thank you.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

The Chair Charles Dent

It was my understanding that the committee was not going to conclude the report, but would keep it available for comment while consideration of the bill is continuing. So we will set the report aside for a minute and invite the Minister of Education to make his opening comments on Bill 25.

Committee Motion 66-12(7): To Adopt Recommendation 5, Carried
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Some Hon. Members

Minister's Introductory Remarks

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1305

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I had thought about making it short, Mr. Chairman. I do want to

make a few introductory comments before we get into my original introductory remarks.

Mr. Chairman, there has been some suggestion that somehow I not take the criticisms or comments as personal. It becomes personal when people threaten you, not explicitly, but that is the reason I tabled the letters today. I do want to say clearly if you read the documents I tabled today, you would see that I take the issues personally because when a Member in this House is trying to serve the public and serve people in their interest, you take seriously the matters of correspondence in the context they are presented. While it may not necessarily be a concern to others, it does cause me personal concern because the Members of the standing committee have been extremely honourable in their approach to Bill 25. They have been absolutely constructive in all their approaches to the kinds of suggestions they have made and the amendments they have proposed. They have been honourable in terms of the way they have dealt with me and I appreciate that.

Mr. Chairman, I want to say to the Members of the standing committee, who I have had an opportunity to meet when I was dealing with Bill 25, despite the fact that we may have had some differences of opinion, in the end those issues we weren't going to get agreement on, we were able to find ways to respond to concerns that my colleagues had. You at least gave me an opportunity to articulate some of the concerns we had and we were then able to work the issues out.

Mr. Chairman, the interesting part is that this consultation process of the development of this act has been taking place for over five years now. We have sought and gathered comments, and the Standing Committee on Legislation has heard and considered the presentations of many education agencies, organizations and individuals. As a result of these hearings, we supported over 80 motions to improve the content and wording of this bill.

Both in its content and its development, Bill 25 emphasizes that education is a partnership. It gives authority to communities, and communities working together, for the delivery of schooling. It provides the flexibility we need for future constitutional development, it focuses on students and emphasizes the importance of parent participation in education.

Mr. Chairman, many people and organizations made comments on this bill. I would like to thank them, the Members of the standing committee and our staff for their efforts. I believe Bill 25 reflects the time and effort it was given. It is a very significant piece of legislation, which I am proud to present.

Mr. Chairman, I just want to say that I still have several amendments to make. I believe that we'll continue to improve the legislation, but I do want to say that, despite what criticisms may arise, I believe that Bill 25 responds to section 23 of the Canadian Charter; it responds favourably. It also responds to many of the court decisions that I've had an opportunity to read. In fact, Mr. Chairman, every other piece of legislation in this country has generally one section, with the exception of the Manitoba act which amendment their legislation to be more specific about the whole matter of Francophone education. In their particular case, it was quite clear that they had the capacity to do that. In our particular situation, there's a new situation in the north. The legislation allows us both the ability to recognize the commit?, the conseil with all its authority, and the responsibility for French language programming. It does not deal with the matter of superintendents, but that is to be left up to the commission to deal with. The conseils are in existence already. So it is clear, even in that authority, that we ensure that there is the authority necessary for the Francophone community and parents to assume the responsibility necessary.

I want to say to my honourable colleagues here, so that it's absolutely clear, that I did meet with the Francophone representatives. I indicated quite clearly that they would be involved in the development of the regulations -- that was absolutely clear in our meetings -- and that I would consult with them on the development of those regulations. I would not work in the absence of that group because it's my view that they have an important part to play and it's necessary for them to be recognized for their important role in these regulations. A letter will be going out accordingly, Mr. Chairman, so that all Members know that it is a serious commitment.

The other issue that I want to be clear about is that our agreement, several years ago, will be included in the regulations. It's my belief that the development of regulations, based on the agreement in 1992, clearly ensures that we are within the scope of section 23. In fact, we exceed what has normally been the court rulings in this country.

Despite that situation, we're prepared to work with the agreement in mind, recognizing our commitments to date. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Minister, for those kind remarks. Does the Minister wish to bring in witnesses?

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Yes.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

The Chair Tony Whitford

Does the committee agree that the Minister take the witness stand, that we introduce the witnesses and then go into general comments on the bill?

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

---Agreed

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

The Chair Tony Whitford

Sergeant-at-arms, would you bring the witnesses in?

Good afternoon, Mr. Minister, you are surrounded by a whole host of witnesses. I think you were allowed to bring in some witnesses, not the whole department. Welcome. I'm just having some fun. Mr. Minister, would you introduce your witnesses to the committee, please?

---Laughter

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1306

Richard Nerysoo Mackenzie Delta

Thank you. Well, we would have, but there aren't enough seats in this Chamber. I appreciate the support of my colleagues. I'll start on my right, Ms. Carol Whitehouse, our legislative counsel; Gail Joyce, director of policy and planning; to my immediate left, Mr. Hal Gerein, deputy minister; Janet Grinsted, senior policy advisor;

and, Mr. Eric Colbourne, assistant deputy minister, educational development.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1307

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Minister, and welcome everyone. It's good to see so many familiar faces again. General comments on Bill 25. The chair recognizes Mr. Pudlat.

General Comments

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

June 13th, 1995

Page 1307

Kenoayoak Pudlat Baffin South

(Translation) Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I just have a short comments, Mr. Chairman, it's not a question, but a comment. Mr. Chairman, I know that the Education Act took a lot of time to put together and a lot of people worked on the act. It took very long but it is completed now, and we have dealt with it in the Standing Committee on Legislation. I'm grateful to the Department of Education and to our committee and the staff who have worked very hard in dealing with this act. I congratulate the Minister and his staff.

I am grateful that the department and our committee were able to travel to the communities for hearings. We heard earlier today some concerns of Members on Bill 25 made on the floor of the House. When we went to the public hearings and heard from the people and students, we were given a lot of support. Perhaps the legislation, in it's present state, won't be approved by everyone but I feel that, by working together, we can resolve some of the concerns that are still in this legislation. I know we can't make everybody happy by dealing with every section of the act, but I was involved with the discussions of this legislation and I feel very confident that we should be able to resolve some of the concerns that the Members might still have.

These are the shortcomings that I would like to note, Mr. Chairman. I would like to thank the Minister, his staff, our staff and the committee for dealing with the legislation during the public hearing. I know this legislation will help students and education officials achieve what they want to achieve for the betterment of the people. When there has to be some amendments to the legislation later on we will be able to deal with it in the future.

This is just a comment to thank the Minister and his staff. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1307

The Chair Tony Whitford

Qujannamiik, Mr. Pudlat. The chair now recognizes the Member for Nahendeh, Mr. Antoine.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1307

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, I wanted to make a comment on the committee report on Bill 25. I wanted to thank the committee for travelling into my constituency and listening to the people in my constituency. There was a presentation made by a representative from each of the six communities that I represent, more so from the people in Fort Simpson. There was a good presentation made there to the committee. I'm satisfied that this committee went out to listen to the people in the communities. Just looking at the document it's obvious that this committee had done a thorough job of going out and trying to get feedback from as many people as they could in the time that they had. I would like to commend the Standing Committee on Legislation for a job well done.

Mr. Chairman, this act is a big act. It involves everybody in the north. It's going to effect how we deal with education in the north for the next decade or so, therefore, it's a very important document. Because it is a very important document, all the concerns have to be looked at and amendments have to be made to this bill. There's going to be debate on this bill for the next few days. I just wanted to make comments on a couple of items on this report.

The first one is with regard to treaty and aboriginal rights. I raised this to the committee Members in Fort Simpson and it was raised here today by other colleagues. This treaty right that I'm referring to in my constituency is Treaty 11. This has always been a concern to me, even before I was involved as a Member of the Legislative Assembly. It's a treaty that was made between a representative of the Dene and a representative of the Crown on how things should be done. It covers a number of areas and one of them is the whole area of education. It's in the treaty, it's in the preamble of the treaty. In my constituency the treaty negotiations took a number of days to be concluded.

In that whole process the understanding of the Dene in that area was that once this treaty was agreed upon, the intent of the treaty was that free education would be provided to the Dene people by the Canadian government.

The evolution of education in the north is that in the late 1960s and early 1970s, this authority was turned over to the Government of the Northwest Territories from Ottawa without the involvement of treaty people. The whole process, the transfer, the devolution happened without the involvement of the treaty people, to whom this particular program was very important. People in power at the time never saw fit to involve the chiefs and leaders of the day.

So we are dealing with this fact. One of the things that I would like to see is that this be cleared up once and for all or it's going to be with us forever. These are the questions that Chiefs in my constituency have been asking for a long time.

It's now addressed in the preamble with the amendment, but I don't think it's strong enough. I think it's going to have to be stronger than just a mention in the preamble, because what I am dealing with is the day-to-day reality that there are people who are treaty from my constituency and probably from other regions as well who are told by our elders that we have a treaty with the government, that this territorial government is an administrative arm of the federal government and therefore the authority should be flowing from the Canadian constitution.

So, that's what I am told, but when it comes to the actual day-to-day practice, there are many people coming to me saying, we thought education was a treaty right. Why am I refused funding, for example, or why am I not allowed to take this course, and why is the government not funding me to go to school, because this is what our ancestors agreed to?

So we find ourselves in a dilemma. Usually I go to the Minister, and usually I get a long letter saying why these things cannot be done. So it's a dilemma I am in. That's why I am saying that it has to be cleared up.

Perhaps it's in because of the regulations or the policies, the way they are interpreted, after a bill goes through. So this is where whoever makes the regulations and the policies has to have a clear understanding of what I am talking about. I think it's been missing. Whoever develops the regulations and the policies on how these bills are interpreted has to take that into consideration. So this is the point I would like to make.

I know the Minister is saying that we are not here to interpret what the treaty says, but the way the people in my area understand the treaty is that it was an agreement that this service would be provided to people. So I want to make it really clear here where I am coming from, that it has to be in the act one way or the other.

The answers that I have heard in the past are that this government recognizes the Canadian constitution, and section 35 of the Canadian constitution states that all existing aboriginal treaty rights will be recognized and affirmed. But when it comes to the specific bills that govern this government, it does not clearly state how section 35 flows into all our bills and how these bills and then the regulations and policies that flow from the bills, how section 35 flows through it until we get into the day-to-day practice of this government. This is where my concern is. A lot of the students in the communities don't really have a clear understanding of all the bills, for example section 35 of the Canadian Constitution, but they know they are treaty Indian and have treaties that state that education is a treaty right and it should flow from there.

If this bill is going to be in place for the next 10 years, and I understand that's the game plan, then it has to be in there and it has to be spelled out very clearly that the bill flows from section 35 of the Canadian Constitution. I'm glad, at least, that there is an amendment to the original bill and it's in the preamble, but like I'm saying, it's not strong enough. I think it should be stronger than that and it should be spelled out more.

Going on the quality and standards of education, I raised this issue in the Standing Committee on Finance. We feel that the excellence of education should be a philosophy throughout the north. I'm glad it was adopted...

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1308

The Chair Tony Whitford

I apologize to the Member, Mr. Antoine. The clock has reached 6:00 pm and our time is up. We haven't had permission to continue, so I would like to take this opportunity to thank the witnesses and the Minister for appearing before the committee. We look forward to seeing you over the next couple of days. With that, I shall rise and report to the Speaker.

Bill 25: Education Act
Item 19: Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 1308

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The House will come back to order. Item 20, report of committee of the whole. Mr. Whitford.

Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 1308

The Chair Tony Whitford

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Your committee has been considering Bill 32, Committee Report 11-12(7) and Bill 25, and would like to report progress with five motions being adopted and that Bill 32 is ready for third reading. Mr. Speaker, I move that the report of committee of the whole be concurred with.

Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 1308

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. The seconder is Mr. Zoe. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 1308

An Hon. Member

Question.

Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Item 20: Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 1308

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion is carried.

---Carried

Item 21, third reading of bills. Mr. Clerk, item 22, orders of the day.

Item 22: Orders Of The Day
Item 22: Orders Of The Day

Page 1308

Clerk Of The House Mr. David Hamilton

Mr. Speaker, there will be meetings tomorrow morning at 9:00 am of the Standing Committee on Finance, at 10:30 am of the Ordinary Members' Caucus, and at 12:00 noon of the Special Joint Committee on Division.

Orders of the day for Wednesday, June 14, 1995:

1. Prayer

2. Ministers' Statements

3. Members' Statements

4. Returns to Oral Questions

5. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

6. Oral Questions

7. Written Questions

8. Returns to Written Questions

9. Replies to Opening Address

10. Petitions

11. Reports of Standing and Special Committees

12. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills

13. Tabling of Documents

14. Notices of Motion

15. Notices of Motions for First Reading of Bills

16. Motions

17. First Reading of Bills

- Bill 34, Supplementary Appropriation Act, No. 1, 1995-96

18. Second Reading of Bills

19. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters - Committee Report 11-12(7), Report on the Review of Bill

25 - The Education Act

- Bill 25, Education Act

20. Report of Committee of the Whole

21. Third Reading of Bills

- Bill 28, An Act to Amend the Legislative Assembly and

Executive Council Act

- Bill 32, An Act to Amend the Legislative Assembly and

Executive Council Act, No. 2

22. Orders of the Day

Item 22: Orders Of The Day
Item 22: Orders Of The Day

Page 1309

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. This House stands adjourned until Wednesday, June 14, 1995, at 1:30 pm.

---ADJOURNMENT