This is page numbers 1471 - 1524 of the Hansard for the 12th Assembly, 7th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was ---agreed.

Topics

Ndilo Education Concerns
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1475

Michael Ballantyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I would like to speak about the community of Ndilo in my constituency. It's been more than a decade and a hall now that I have had the privilege of working with the people of Ndilo and the Yellowknives Dene Band. When I started, Chief Isidore Tsetta was the chief of the Yellowknives Band and Eddie Lacome was the subchief for what was then called Rainbow Valley. When I came on to the scene, there was a major jurisdictional problem and everything had stopped in Ndilo. The federal government said it was a territorial responsibility; the municipal government said it was a federal government responsibility and nothing was happening. The people then were real victims of bureaucratic in-lighting.

From that time, I and many of us have always treated Ndilo as its own community. Many times over the last decade and a half we have tried ways to formalize its status as its own community, but there have been so many barriers. But anyhow, the government and the Legislative Assembly were good enough to include Ndilo in the five-year plan and, for all intents and purposes for the last decade, Ndilo has been treated fairly with h other communities in the Northwest Territories. The issue of education has always been a very important issue in Ndilo. I remember that we started off, probably nine or 10 years ago, with a very successful upgrading program. Everybody remembers Florence Erasmus, the Tree of Peace and their kindergarten program in Ndilo which was a mainstay of the community for many years. In the last couple of years, there has been a very successful after-school care program.

The people of Ndilo, for many years, have been frustrated With the lack of success of their students in the education system here in Yellowknife. They have really thought that because they are a community, they should have more community control over the system. I want to thank the Minister. There have been a number of discussions with the Minister and the issue has come up again around the Education Act.

Mr. Speaker, the band is looking at getting support for the head start program, a pre-school care program in Ndilo, this fall. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

Ndilo Education Concerns
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1476

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Yellowknife North is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mr. Ballantyne.

Ndilo Education Concerns
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1476

Michael Ballantyne Yellowknife North

They've made a presentation to the Minister to start work on a school in Ndilo, starting off kindergarten to grade 3 but over a period of time having kindergarten to grade 8. The Minister has been open; there's been a lot of support from the Catholic school board, and I think there is a lot of possibility.

I think it's very important for the people of Ndilo. They feel that if they can run the school down there, they can get the parents involved in the school, they can bring the support mechanism to get the kids to school and make sure the kids are successful.

Their intention, ultimately, is to have these successful kids come out of grade 8 and enter the Catholic high school in Yellowknife and go on to whatever career choices they may want to make.

At some point, they are looking at belonging to a Treaty 8 education division, and I know again that the Minister is open and flexible about how, over a period of time, these aspirations can be met.

The people of Ndilo have always felt, just because of the status of their community, that they've been isolated from Dettah, which has a different status. So we are looking at ways that the education programs between the two communities can work more closely together.

So, during the course of the next couple of days, as we discuss the Education Act, there are other meetings happening with the Minister. The Minister has indicated to me and to other MLAs that he's open to finding a solution to allow the people of Ndilo to take more control over the education of their am looking forward to a successful conclusion of those discussions. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Ndilo Education Concerns
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1476

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Ballantyne. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Pudlat.

Appreciation For Support During Tenure As Mla
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1476

Kenoayoak Pudlat Baffin South

(Translation) Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am standing up today to thank some people. I don't usually ask much from you, Mr. Speaker, and I will thank you, Mr. Speaker. I know that I am going to be here today and tomorrow during the session. From then on, I will not be attending the rest of the session and this is the last time that I am going to be able to stand up and say what I have to say.

I would like to thank my children, my wife and my relatives, because they have waited and were patient with me while I have been a Member of the Legislative Assembly.

I know that my constituents are not very close; Sanikiluaq is pretty far away. Some times a was very difficult for me to visit my constituents there.

For almost four years, the people I represent have supported me and I would like to thank them. Especially in this year, 1995, I was away from my constituents for a long time dealing with important stuff such as preparation for division and helping out my constituents and I have tried very hard to represent the wishes of the people who elected me. I would like to thank them for being able to support me while I have been a Member of the Legislative Assembly.

I will be here tomorrow in the House, but from then on, I will not be attending. Maybe because we are going to be finished this week. I would also request, Mr. Speaker, to conclude my statement.

Appreciation For Support During Tenure As Mla
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1476

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Baffin South is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mr. Pudlat.

Appreciation For Support During Tenure As Mla
Item 3: Members' Statements

June 21st, 1995

Page 1476

Kenoayoak Pudlat Baffin South

(Translation) Thank you, Mr. Speaker and Members of this House. I will not make a lengthy statement, but I just want to thank the Members, especially seeing as this is our last session. I would like to thank the Members of the Legislative Assembly for assisting me and for helping me with whatever I need.

I would like to thank all the Ministers as well for being able to respond to the numerous requests that I have made. I would like to thank the previous Speaker and the present Speaker for allowing me to speak. I would especially like to thank the staff of the Legislative Assembly for assisting me, even though I cannot speak English. I would also like to thank the people in my community who assisted me. I would like to thank my constituency assistant in Lake Harbour. She's always available whenever I need some assistance. I would especially like to thank the interpreters because I have to use them on a day-to-and I day basis during the session. They were able to accompany me whenever I had to go travelling with committees or on other assignments I had to attend to. So I would like to say thank you very much to the interpreters for helping me and assisting me for almost four years.

I know we have met numerous times in the House this year, because we have to deal with legislation for the betterment of the people in the Northwest Territories.

Also, I would like to thank the people on the Legislation and Finance committees. Lastly, I would like to thank every one of you. I will see you again tomorrow. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Appreciation For Support During Tenure As Mla
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Pudlat. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Dent.

Importance Of Small Business
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

Charles Dent Yellowknife Frame Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to speak today about the importance of small business in Yellowknife and the north; especially since the constituency I represent includes the Airport Road and the Kam Lake Industrial Park which has a lot of small businesses in it, and I spend a lot of time talking to small business owners.

Mr. Speaker, I was able to find out that there are 1,761 businesses currently registered in Yellowknife. We can probably estimate that about 1,000 of those will be home occupations or single-source contractors, so that means that there are about 700 storefront operations. Many of those will have started as home occupations, but now are employing people, serving other people across the north.

Small business provides a major source of employment in the north. As we know, the private sector represents an awful lot of jobs. In Yellowknife -- if we include those working for the mines -- we probably have over half of all employment, or at least 5,500 to 6,000 jobs which are provided by the private sector. Employees in these businesses provide this government with a major source of revenue. Easily one quarter of all personal tax revenue collected by this government will come from people working in private industry in Yellowknife. On top of that, the businesses themselves will be supplying a significant portion of the corporate taxes this government receives.

Mr. Speaker, it has long been recognized that the small business sector is best at creating new jobs. With division coming, with funding cuts from Ottawa, it's important that we encourage the development of small business. It's there that we see the future when it comes to more jobs for northerners.

This government needs to examine how it deals with business and make sure that it is business-friendly. We need to look for ways to streamline the regulatory and paperwork functions, perhaps by taking a look at the Newfoundland example where fees have been cut for services.

Mr. Speaker, this government needs to move quickly to get business and labour working on recommendations for revising our Labour Standards Act. Then we also need to make sure that this government is enforcing the provisions of labour standards across the board, making sure that there is a level playing field for business. Too often, we hear of southern competition being able to do a job cheaper in the north because they're in and out quickly, and are never checked to ensure that they live up to the standards northern companies must adhere to. But most important, Mr. Speaker, this government needs to develop an attitude that we support the development of small business. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Importance Of Small Business
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Dent. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Zoe.

Appointment Of Mr. Dan Marion, Deputy Commissioner
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

Henry Zoe North Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I was pleased to learn today, Mr. Speaker, that Mr. Dan Marion, the mayor of Rae Edzo, has been appointed as the new Deputy Commissioner

---Applause

...filling the vacancy left when Helen Maksagak became Commissioner. As one of my constituents, I've known Mr. Marion for many years. He is a hard-working individual who has done his best to promote the community of Rae-Edzo and the entire Dogrib region. Dan believes strongly in the ability of northerners to work together for a better future. He also has great respect for the values and traditions of aboriginal people of the Dogrib area.

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Marion began public life in the Northwest Territories in 1970 when he was elected to the town council of Fort Norman. He has spent the last 25 years involved as a politician in Fort Norman and Rae-Edzo. He has also served as a board member for the Rae-Edzo Dene Band Development Corporation and the Northwest Territories Development Corporation.

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Marion has many contacts across the Northwest Territories. Through his past work as a member of the executive of the Northwest Territories Association of Municipalities, he has worked with leaders from many of our communities. I am sure they will be pleased with his appointment and will lend their support to him in his new role. I am sure, Mr. Speaker, that Mr. Marion and our Commissioner, Ms. Maksagak, will prove to be a dynamic team representing the Northwest Territories in a way in which all of us can be proud of. I invite all Members to join with me in congratulating Mr. Dan Marion on his appointment as the new Deputy Commissioner. Mahsi.

---Applause

Appointment Of Mr. Dan Marion, Deputy Commissioner
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Zoe. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Antoine.

Lack Of Dall Sheep Quota In Mackenzie Mountains
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1477

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, there is no quota on Dall Sheep in the Mackenzie Mountains. This is the only place in Canada and the United States where there is no limit on how many sheep are hunted by big game hunters. There is no way to monitor the sheep, except from the outfitters

themselves. This is what we are told. We have to believe what the outfitters tell us. An outfitter could book 100 hunters in one zone, and they could take 100 sheep out there and there is no real control. This is the concern that I've heard from different people in my constituency; the problem of overhunting the sheep in the Mackenzie Mountain ranges.

There is a real danger for overhunting in the big game hunting zones. This could be detrimental to the animal population in the mountains, west of the communities I represent. This is a traditional area of a lot of the Dene people. An outfitter could hunt an area hard for a few years, then sell out the area for enormous profits. These zones have become assets to the people who are the outfitters.

There are four types of big horn sheep in North America, and the Dall Sheep is one of them. The others are very well controlled, I'm told. For example, in British Columbia, each area is regulated by quotas. The local biologist determines how many sheep could be taken out of an area; lot's say, eight or 12 out of a hunting zone. This is the quota for one hunting area and it is very well controlled.

Mr. Speaker, in order to determine quotas we need to survey and count the animals in the mountains, especially the sheep, on an annual basis. The government will say there's no money, so I would like to make one suggestion, Mr. Speaker: let us place a higher fee on each of the non-resident hunters who come into our area so they could pay for the survey and counting of these animals. For example, in order to pay for the survey, let's say $1,000 per tag for each non-resident hunter. This is a request for support in this area, Mr. Speaker.

Another problem I have is that there is a request by big game hunters for grizzly bear tags now. Here again, I have to oppose this because I need to know the status of the population in the Mackenzie mountains of the grizzly bears before I approve anything like this.

Mr. Speaker, my time has run out. I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement. Mahsi.

Lack Of Dall Sheep Quota In Mackenzie Mountains
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1478

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Nahendeh is seeking unanimous consent. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mr. Antoine.

Lack Of Dall Sheep Quota In Mackenzie Mountains
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1478

Jim Antoine Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The problem is not only with sheep, Mr. Speaker, but has to do with moose, caribou and the different animals in the mountains. We don't know how many there are and there is really no good way of surveying them. There are occasional fly-over surveys, but that is not good enough, Mr. Speaker.

Historically, Mr. Speaker, big game hunting zones were practically given away in the 1970s by the Commissioner of the day. There were five zones and now there are more; there are eight, I believe. Now, we're stuck with the outfitters who control these hunting zones and mountains. They are the only ones allowed to take non-resident hunters into the mountains and the aboriginal people are cut out of the deal. These outfitters all live in the south, Mr. Speaker, and though they are available for sale for enormous amounts of money if they become available, the amounts are impossible for the aboriginal people from the communities to have access to.

Mr. Speaker, recently there was a meeting in Fort Simpson where aboriginal people and leaders met with the outfitters from the mountains. As a result of this meeting, some decisions were made that there would be closer cooperation between the outfitters and aboriginal leaders. Hopefully, this will improve the situation and help the concerns of people in my constituency. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause