This is page numbers 43 - 55 of the Hansard for the 13th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was public.

Topics

Placing Of NWT Dog Mushers At World Championship Dog Derby
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 44

Roy Erasmus Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I was provided some information on some dog mushers who are at the 105-mile world championship at The Pas, Manitoba, practising up for the Arctic Winter Games. In first place after the first day was Richard Beck from Yellowknife.

---Applause

Third place is Frank Kelly from Yellowknife.

---Applause

Fourth place is Grant Beck from Yellowknife.

---Applause

Fifth place is Raymond Beck from Hay River.

---Applause

Eighth place is Ernie Campbell from Yellowknife.

---Applause

Twelfth place is the only girl in the race, and a rookie, Heather Beck.

---Applause

In thirteenth place is Jim Essrey from Hay River.

---Applause

Thank you.

Placing Of NWT Dog Mushers At World Championship Dog Derby
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 44

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. O'Brien.

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

Kevin O'Brien Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the issue I will once again speak to today is with regard to the Rankin Inlet tank farm project. Mr. Speaker, since it appears we are still in a holding pattern for information relating to this project, I feel compelled to read the following press release that was issued last week by the Arviat hamlet council.

It reads as follows:

The Arviat hamlet council once again questions the need for the proposed Rankin Inlet fuel resupply hub.

Arviat (February 6th) - Acting Mayor Peter Kritaqliluk, reacting to the press release from Public Works and Services Minister Goo Arlooktoo announcing the resumption of negotiations for a contract to construct a P.O.L. hub tank farm at Rankin Inlet, wishes to bring the following issues to the attention of the general public.

Does the GNWT, in light of division of the NWT in 1999, have the mandate to negotiate and enter into a contract for 20 to 25 years?

With the councils of Baker Lake, Arviat and Coral Harbour previously on record as being opposed to this project, on what authority does the GNWT feel it can proceed with this project?

"With clearly more than 50 per cent of the representative population of the Keewatin region against this project, why is it that the GNWT is treating this as a priority project and proceeding with negotiations? Is the government refusing to listen to the people?" said Kritaqliluk.

The churchill tank farm, owned by the Government of Canada, as noted in Arlooktoo's press release of February 2, 1996 is, "scheduled to shut down in 1998. The territorial government had the opportunity to purchase this facility, but declined."

"Our initial inquiries indicate that the Churchill facility will close in 1998 because it would no longer have a purpose if the GNWT isn't going to store fuel for the Keewatin there." said Kritaqliluk.

A committee struck by the Arviat hamlet council has discovered that the cost of upgrading the existing Churchill fuel storage facility was estimated at a fraction of the estimated $16 million required to construct a Rankin Inlet facility. The tank farm component of the Rankin Inlet project, by the GNWT's own estimate, would be in excess of $6 million alone. In addition, marine and navigational improvements for the Rankin project would cost in excess...

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. O'Brien. Your time is up.

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

Kevin O'Brien Kivallivik

I am seeking permission to continue my statement, Mr. Speaker.

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Kivallivik is seeking unanimous consent. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mr. O'Brien.

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

Kevin O'Brien Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

...marine and navigational improvements for the Rankin project would cost in excess of another $10 million, making the total cost of the project in excess of $16 million.

"In light of the GNWT's projected $150 million deficit, how can this project still be justified?" asks Kritaqliluk.

Mr. Speaker, I will speak to this further during question period. Thank you.

Arviat Press Release Re Rankin Inlet Tank Farm
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Ootes.

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 45

Jake Ootes Yellowknife Centre

Good morning, everyone. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wish to refer to a commentary in the Globe and Mail titled: "Civil Servants Lead Lives of Quiet Collusion." It is by a fellow named Chris Dray. I will just refer to portions of it.

I am a public servant. I have been in the workforce for 20 years and spent half that time as an employee of one government or another. I have always done my best to do good work and like so many public servants, I have seen most of that work come to nothing. Programs go off the rails, studies get shelved, ideas get dropped or sent round and round from desk to desk until they grow stale or get lost along the way. At times it has been hard for me to justify the lack of results after all the hours of effort and money expended.

There is a quiet collusion amongst public servants about this kind of thing. We acknowledge that government is ineffective. We tell each other that there is nothing we can do about it. We absolve each other of responsibility. We blame others or the system for the global conditions. Yet, somewhere deep within us, there is an unthinkable thought that rises like bile to sour our outlook. Once you have to have that unthinkable thought, you pass beyond the comfort of absolution. As I sit at my desk, a single public servant very deep within the bowels of government, the unthinkable thought comes to me as a litany.

Whether you produce results or not, the pay is the same; whether you work hard or not, the pay is the same; whether you care or not, the pay is the same.

And as long as you don't take a risk, question too deeply or speak the truth to power, the pay cheques keep rolling in like waves on a beach.

In business, if you forget who your customer is or produce a poor product or let costs get out of hand, you fail and the price of failure is clear; You go out of business. This is not the case with government. In government, you can ignore the customer, as long as you satisfy the politicians, because that's who the money comes from. You can produce a poor product because, in most cases, the customer...

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 46

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Ootes, your time is up. Mr. Ootes.

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 46

Jake Ootes Yellowknife Centre

I seek permission to carry on.

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 46

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Yellowknife Centre is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement.

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 46

Jake Ootes Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

...And you can get lost out of hand because there is no competition to provide the same product at less cost and there is little accountability except to the politicians, but they are dependent on you for information. If you tell them everything is going well, how can they say otherwise? After all, they are well-meaning amateurs while you are the professional. Public servants simply know better.

Is government really this dysfunctional? To me, it's hard to tell because I don't know the public service today. I do know that from the ones I've talked to, many public servants elsewhere like this person who, by the way, is a Member of the Yukon government, is very disillusioned and they are very disillusioned. Perhaps it is time for us to find out as well what the morale is within our government and to deal with some of the problems facing that morale.

We're the leaders of the government. We here can make the changes. There are tremendously important resource for us here in the North. Perhaps it's time for us to think about different methods and different approaches and become unconventional in government ways of treating our public servants. Perhaps, like industry, we have to establish some incentives for our public servants. Hypothetically, if it's a deputy minister or assistant deputy minster, perhaps even program managers, there is a financial incentive. If they bring their budgets in line, then they get rewarded. If they overspend they get tagged for that and perhaps there's a penalty for it. If they bring it in under budget perhaps there's a reward for them.

I think we have to start thinking of these types of incentives when we face the kind of budget cuts that we're looking at. Thank you.

Article Titled "civil Servants Lead Lives Of Quiet Collusion"
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 46

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Ootes. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Krutko.

Amalgamation Of Renewable Resources And Ed&t
Item 3: Members' Statements

February 16th, 1996

Page 46

David Krutko Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My statement is with regard to the Honourable Donnie Morin's statement on amalgamating the departments of Renewable Resources and Economic Development and Tourism. It's with regard to natural resource development, especially in my region, the Delta, where we have a long, great history of trapping in the Delta except for the downturn of the trapping industry.

In order for us to proceed with that process of amalgamating these departments, we have to take into account the interest groups that are out there. We have land claims groups in the Delta, we have hunters' and trappers' associations. When it comes to commercializing anything, especially what we've seen with regard to commercial harvesting of muskox and caribou and also the history of big game hunting, especially what we've seen in the Mackenzie Mountains, it has to be taken into account that the local hunters and trappers have to be involved with how that amalgamation takes place, also with regard to how the NWT Act will be amended to streamline the commercial harvesting and also allow people to get back to a wage economy.

Also keeping in mind that there are some clear obligations which are under land claims agreements that we have to adhere to with regard to the wildlife sections of the Inuvialuit agreement, the Gwich'in agreement and also the commercial harvesting sectors that are in there when we look at amending any of these acts to allow for this amalgamation to take place. There are also economic factors that we have to consider.

In closing, I would like the Ministers to keep in mind that when these amalgamations do take place that there are interest groups in the communities and in the regions with regard to land claims settlements. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.