This is page numbers 241 - 272 of the Hansard for the 13th Assembly, 7th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was chairman.

Topics

Member's Statement 110-13(7): Territorial Youth Legislative Assembly
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 243

Roy Erasmus Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to speak about the Territorial Youth Legislative Assembly that will be occurring here in May. Mr. Speaker, I suppose it is appropriate that we have put in place a training program for young legislators as we are trying to train people in other areas. The way this is happening, Mr. Speaker, is that all the schools that have grades nine and ten have been asked to submit two names of youth and the youth will be coming here to represent our MLAs and sit in our chairs, ask questions, be Ministers, the whole works.

Yesterday and today the Mildred Hall School in Yellowknife here did a trial run with our staff. The staff had gone to the schools, explained the process and worked with the students and they would like to thank the teacher that they worked mainly with was Yasemin Heyck.

Mr. Speaker, I had an opportunity today to watch the grade seven and eight students in the House here and they made Ministers' statements and Members' statements, there were oral questions, there was a Speaker. It was very well done and I was quite impressed with some of the statements that were made on how to improve education in Mildred Hall, more field trips in education, the name of the Northwest Territories, they did not think too much of Bob either. Also, they thought it would be a good idea to have a better place to skateboard in Yellowknife. Under oral questions there were questions on a central hiring agency, royalties from diamond mines and those types of things. I am told that the youth had their own questions, although the staff did help some of them in formulating the questions. I was quite impressed with the young fellow, Michael Lane, who sat in my seat. He did a much better job than I. He asked a similar question to what I had asked a month ago about student jobs in the summer. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

Member's Statement 110-13(7): Territorial Youth Legislative Assembly
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Yellowknife North is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Do I have any nays? Mr. Erasmus, you have unanimous consent to conclude your statement.

Member's Statement 110-13(7): Territorial Youth Legislative Assembly
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

Roy Erasmus Yellowknife North

Thank you, colleagues. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I was saying, Michael Lane was sitting in my chair and he did a very good job asking questions about the student summer jobs and having a central agency for that. It was very ironic because about a month or so ago, the last time we were here, I had asked a very similar question to the Minister. Anyway, some of the students that I recognized from Yellowknife North were Dahti Scott, Aaron Norwegian, Alex Wah-shee and Carmen Braden, who acted as the Premier, and I would like to congratulate all the students on a job well done and we look forward to seeing the other students from the rest of the territories in May. Thank you.

--Applause

Member's Statement 110-13(7): Territorial Youth Legislative Assembly
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Members' statements. Mr. Morin.

Member's Statement 111-13(7): History Of Fort Resolution And The North
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

Don Morin Tu Nedhe

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today I would like to talk a bit about Fort Resolution, the oldest community in the western Arctic. As some Members know, Fort Resolution used to be the oldest trading centre and the most active one at the turn of the century. Fort Resolution was founded as a trading post, a Northwest Trading Company as well as the Hudson Bay Trading Company, and it grew also into one of the biggest hospital centres in the western Arctic. It had a major hospital there run by the Catholic church, as well as it had a major educational centre called residential schooling. As Fort Resolution grew, also the Northwest Territories grew, but its shift started to change from a fur type, renewable resource economy to a non-renewable resource economy.

For example, the gold mines in Yellowknife. When the gold mines in Yellowknife started up, the closest resources for timber were in the Slave River lowlands and in the Slave River Valley. Back in the 1930s they started logging and sawing in the Slave River lowlands, just outside of Fort Resolution, and the majority of the people working in those sawmills came from my community, Fort Resolution. In those days, Mr. Speaker, they had about five or six sawmills along the Slave River and Jean Marie River and they used to saw logs by hand with a crosscut saw and saw them up in the sawmills, load the barges by hand and bring it to Yellowknife for timbers for the gold mines here. They also supplied much of the lumber that built Yellowknife and that is in some of the older buildings in this community.

Consequently, Mr. Speaker, you do have the enjoyment of visiting elders in our community and every time you visit an elder they all talk about working in the sawmill. They all talk about doing that type of work to support their family, so you do have grandfathers that have worked in sawmills, you do have fathers that have worked in sawmills and now you have the sons that are working in the present sawmill in Fort Resolution. This is part of the culture of Fort Resolution, it is part of our history and we will continue to do that. The people of Fort Resolution are proud people and we all want to work for our dollars, none of us want to get welfare. So, in the end, Mr. Speaker, I came from Fort Resolution yesterday, I saw a yard full of logs and everybody was looking at hearing that headsaw fire up. Thank you.

Member's Statement 111-13(7): History Of Fort Resolution And The North
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Members' statements. Mr. Rabesca.

Member's Statement 112-13(7): Recognition Of Two Outstanding Constituents
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

James Rabesca North Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I raise to recognize two very important residents of my region. Both Doreen Nitsiza of Wha Ti and Eddie Weyallon of Rae-Edzo are volunteer workers in their communities. Over the years both have worked very hard helping their communities to become a better place to live and raise a family. Over the years Doreen has volunteered her time and energy coaching and raising money for the volleyball team and has served with the Wha Ti Sport and Culture Association for many years. Eddie Weyallon has committed his time volunteering for the past 30 years, and has served under seven different chiefs as the Rae Band's head boss for organizing events and a role model for the younger generations.

Voluntarism is a very important part of all communities. If it were not for volunteers, most if not all carnivals, dances, bingos, community radio channels, community feasts and the list continues, would never take place. We need these generous people and I thought today I would recognize two of these very important members of our community and thank them for their hard work and dedication. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

--Applause

Member's Statement 112-13(7): Recognition Of Two Outstanding Constituents
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 244

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Mr. Miltenberger.

Return To Oral Question 58-13(7): Diamond Training Programs
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

Page 244

Michael Miltenberger Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have a return to an oral question asked by Mr. Erasmus on March 29, 1999. The government has spent approximately $200,000 to train northern people at Sirius Diamonds diamond processing plant. Sirius Diamonds is currently in the process of setting up its new facility in the City of Yellowknife and will be making permanent job offers to seven of the candidates who started the initial training program. As well, we have been advised by Sirius Diamonds that ten additional job offers will be made to participants in the current Aurora College diamond pre-employment program. Thank you.

Return To Oral Question 58-13(7): Diamond Training Programs
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

Page 244

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

April 21st, 1999

Page 244

Roy Erasmus Yellowknife North

Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize Ms. Pat Thomas, who has been here many days trying to slug through the same stuff that we have. Thank you.

--Applause

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 245

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Recognitions of visitors in the gallery. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Erasmus.

Question 88-13(7): Grade Extensions In Small Communities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 245

Roy Erasmus Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. It is partially in relation to the Minister's Forum on Education. Mr. Speaker, recently we have been hearing that people from Deline had wanted to be able to send their children to a school in Yellowknife, presumably because they felt that they could get a better education here. I have not really gotten any more information on that item, but did hear a news broadcast on that.

In the Minister's Forum on Education, there are several comments here that the grade extensions have come up with a modest increase in the graduation rate, but it certainly has not increased at the same rate as the participation rate. It goes on to say that high schools in many communities are only able to offer a narrow range of courses because they have fewer teachers and more limited range of subject expertise, and specialized resources for math and sciences are highlighted as inadequate. Also, opportunities are more limited in small schools for extracurricular activities such as competitive sports, and interesting learning opportunities outside the classroom, and other points are made. Mr. Speaker, what I would like to know is has the Minister had any time to consider this particular area of the Minister's Forum report and also, stemming from the Deline request?

Question 88-13(7): Grade Extensions In Small Communities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 245

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Minister of Education, Culture and Employment, Mr. Miltenberger. Two questions.

Return To Question 88-13(7): Grade Extensions In Small Communities
Question 88-13(7): Grade Extensions In Small Communities
Item 6: Oral Questions

Page 245

Michael Miltenberger Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as I have indicated in the House previously, we are working on the recommendations, we recognise that there are some big ones that are very expensive but there are others that we think we can come forward with a realistic plan for implementation. I have indicated that we intend to do that. I intend to be able to bring something forward when we gather in June that will show the result of that work with the department with the ministerial forum members and with the DEAs and DECs providing feedback. At this point I cannot respond specifically to that other than to say, all of these recommendations are being looked at and we are going to bring forward something for this House to look at. Thank you.