This is page numbers 4463 - 4502 of the Hansard for the 16th Assembly, 4th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was health.

Topics

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

I’d like the Minister to identify what he means by liabilities. Could he list some of the liabilities of being removed from the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation regime? Thank you.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

There are some ongoing costs with operating the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. There are liabilities that have been cumulated through the operation of Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. At the time of incorporation, I understand there were some considerations that were agreed to by all of the different parties that agreed to participate as part of the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. I understand that there was legislation that was passed by this House to allow our participation as well. So we would have to deal with that part of it also. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

The Minister doesn’t sound very supportive of the vote from the fishermen to be removed from the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. Again, I don’t really understand what the liabilities are. Is he talking about financial liabilities? Is there some outstanding debt that needs to be paid? Do we owe something to the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation? I’m not understanding that. And as far as the legislation passed in this House, what is the department doing to bring forward whatever change in legislation needs to be enacted in order to see our fishery stand alone from the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation? Thank you.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

The Member just asked me what I saw as the first steps that would be required. I can certainly sound more enthusiastic, but there are liabilities in it and we are waiting for the formal transmission of the motion so we can determine what is required on our part. As I said, we have proposed in the budget some funding so we can begin to develop local markets and opportunities for fishermen. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Final supplementary, Mrs. Groenewegen.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Well, pardon me if I sound excited about this, but we’ve been talking about the Great Slave Lake fishery here for years and always felt that a big impediment to the fishermen, realizing the potential in the industry was the monopoly by the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. So I would hope now that with the motion I’m sure that will be conveyed formally to this government, that the government will begin to put together a plan and a strategy to assist the fishermen to process and market their product. Could the Minister please tell me if such a plan will be forthcoming? Thank you.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

We’d be very pleased to be able to work with the fishermen to identify opportunities and plans to work with them in setting up their businesses so they can market Northwest Territories fish which, similar to the fur, is some of the best in the world. One of the things we have to do is work with the federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans to determine responsibilities in terms of dealing with fishermen on Great Slave Lake. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 398-16(4): Marketing For The Great Slave Lake Fishery
Oral Questions (Reversion)

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. The honourable Member for Hay River South, Mrs. Groenewegen.

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

February 24th, 2010

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I’m going to ask a question to the Minister of Health and Social Services while I have this opportunity today. I’ve be listening to my colleague Mr. Krutko and my colleague Mr. Menicoche talk about the nursing services for Tsiigehtchic and Wrigley and even with all the debate and questions that’s gone back and forth, I still don’t really understand one thing. Is the ability to put nurses in these communities a financial consideration? Is it about the financial resources in order to do this?

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mrs. Groenewegen. The honourable Minister of Health and Social Services, Ms. Lee.

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Range Lake

Sandy Lee Minister of Health and Social Services

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I thank the Member for the question. It is financial in one way, but actually it’s much more than that. It’s operational as well. In terms of governance, we deliver our health care services through regional authorities. They’re provided with a block funding. They have services that they need to provide; nursing services being one crucial item. But they do not fund or they do not spend their money per community. They provide nursing coverage for the entire authority, a lot like school boards. Teachers get hired by school boards and they are employees of the board. The same with nurses. They get hired for the board and they get placed and sometimes they are resident in their communities, but in many cases like the Beaufort-Delta, in all our regional authorities, they travel. They provide services in whatever is needed and actually the authorities need some flexibility to make sure where there are vacancies... And the nurses are not all the same nurses, they have all different skills. For most of our authorities, they need to be able to use their resources where it is most needed and for many, many small communities, they are travelling nurses and they try to give as many hours as possible to all communities for nursing coverage and other essential services. Thank you.

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

So I understand that it is an operational issue to some extent and that regional health authorities have the ability to determine how to distribute those resources. What role does our government play in setting the standards of health care delivery on the basis of a population or a community? Surely there must be some role that our government plays in terms of determining the level of service. I think that there had been some considerable work that had been done on that. What role does our government have in determining that?

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Range Lake

Sandy Lee Minister of Health and Social Services

Obviously, the money is a big factor, but also our authorities are guided by our direction, such as the service delivery model that I’m sure the Member has heard about for many, many years now; the Integrated Service Delivery Model. The Foundation for Change Action Plan does speak to where our focus is and the goals of that plan are wellness, access and sustainability. So when we’re talking about health care services, we’re talking about making sure all our residents have access to health and social services, and for some communities it is some of the resident support. But the priority is to make sure that every resident in the Northwest Territories has essential services, access to the services, but they may not always have them living in their community. Thank you.

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I can fully understand why Members representing small communities would consider having a nurse resident in the community to be a very important thing. Access sounds nice, but it doesn’t address the issue of emergencies and just, I suppose, the comfort level people have knowing that there is a qualified health care professional in the community should the need to receive services arise. It’s complicated, the answer, but does the Minister at least acknowledge the issue around the quality of life that’s realized in these small communities if they had a resident health care practitioner in the community? Thank you.

Question 399-16(4): Nursing Services In Small Communities
Oral Questions (Reversion)

Range Lake

Sandy Lee Minister of Health and Social Services

I absolutely totally understand that and I think it’s much more difficult for the communities of Tsiigehtchic and Wrigley because they had a resident nurse and they now no longer have that since 2003. There are many communities in the Territories of similar size who have never had a resident nurse. What is really important for people to know is that if a community doesn’t have a resident nurse, it doesn’t mean that they don’t have the health care they need. The community health reps and other care providers are in constant touch with medical professionals all across the Territories. There is no community where local health care professionals are practicing in isolation. At any given time, the doctors and nurses across the Territories are in touch with all the communities and when patients present themselves, they are

diagnosed and assessed by all the professionals in an equitable way. Mr. Speaker, there was one more point I want to make, but I’ll just finish it there. Thank you.