This is page numbers 6827 – 6882 of the Hansard for the 17th Assembly, 5th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was assembly.

Topics

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

We think that’s a very important initiative not only for the Sahtu but in other regions of the Northwest Territories. Despite the fact that we’re very close to election mode and we are also having to follow transitional operational guidelines, we will have our bureaucracy, so we can set the wheels in motion. They can start doing preparatory work so when the 18th Assembly is in place, we can hit the ground running or start working on it and get them to deal with it right away. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

Norman Yakeleya Sahtu

What the Premier is saying is indeed good news. We can get the motion in gear and have some discussion with our leadership, land corporations, and look at some maps and see what needs to happen in terms of a good conference to get a good, accurate assessment of what is in the Sahtu and what areas we can look at to improve the development of a mineral strategy that the Sahtu region can work towards in five or 10 years as to how to extract or develop a mineral strategy and something like the Selwyn-Chihong operation that is expected to go into a billion dollar production sometime in the future.

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I’ve had the opportunity to travel to Selwyn with the Member in the 16th Assembly. Certainly, the potential there is tremendous and the largest portion is in the Territories. It’s a tremendous opportunity for not only the Sahtu but the Northwest Territories. We will have to pursue that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Final, short supplementary, Mr. Yakeleya.

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

Norman Yakeleya Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I enjoyed the tour with the Premier when we had that visit into the Sahtu. I know other areas in the Northwest Territories are rich in minerals. When we look at the Sahtu mineral strategy, we are looking at also the types of infrastructure that can help us with our mineral strategy. One of them is the Mackenzie Valley Highway.

Is that something we can look at in all aspects of the mineral strategy, so we can get our people to look at the area, look at the environment, look at the infrastructure and say we have a plan for the Sahtu to extract, develop and produce some of our rich minerals?

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I know the Member was listening very closely when the Minister of Transportation was talking about our highway priorities. Certainly, the Mackenzie Valley Highway would certainly facilitate development in those areas. A highway would change the logistics of quite a number of projects, not only on the mineral side but oil and gas side. I really believe it would facilitate those projects to move into production. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 956-17(5): Sahtu Mineral Strategy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Yellowknife for Yellowknife Centre, Mr. Hawkins.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have questions for the Minister of Justice. It’s regarding RCMP and their side job, if I may describe it that way, in transporting prisoners back and forth between the jails. It’s been brought to my attention that the RCMP do this activity regularly. The question came as why doesn’t the sheriff’s office either use their existing resources or bolster their resources to do that particular job?

Frankly, we all know that a member of the RCMP, when you do what’s called the all-in cost, runs in the range of $175,000 to $200,000. It’s much more cost effective to have the sheriff’s office doing those duties between their other ones if they are shuffling prisoners back and forth between the jail and the courthouse. The point is I think it’s better use of RCMP time to put their service in the community, responding to crime and investigating crime.

Has the department investigated this idea and what consideration have they put to it? If they haven’t, will they?

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Hawkins. Minister of Justice, Mr. Ramsay.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

David Ramsay Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. To my knowledge, it’s corrections services that transports people back and forth between the facility and the courthouse. I can look into this matter further for the Member and get some further detail, but to my knowledge, it’s corrections services that provides that service and not the RCMP. Thank you.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

I know that that’s probably normally the case that the corrections services does that one, but there’s also interjurisdictional travel that is required by shuffling inmates back and forth or other types of similar situations, and we bring the RCMP off duty and they have to find folks to wear that duty outside of normal operating hours, and that affects the RCMP, and everyone complains in this community that they’re unable to get more RCMP on the ground doing the job that they do, and they certainly do so well.

When it comes to interjurisdictional transfers of prisoners and usages of those types of resources, would the Minister investigate the possibility of using the sheriff’s office? If they don’t have the resources, bolster the resources appropriately, because it’s cheaper for us to afford a few extra hours as the sheriff doing that duty than it is taking an RCMP off the street.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

David Ramsay Kam Lake

It would go back to the circumstances surrounding the individual who was being transported, but again, to my knowledge, the corrections service does supply that type of duty or obligation in getting inmates transferred from facility to facility. But again, depending on the nature of the individual and security risk, the RCMP may be involved in that. As to whether or not the sheriff’s office could take part in transferring folks around, again, that’s something that I’ll go back to the department and ask them about.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

October 8th, 2015

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

Well, if the Minister is not sure it happens, I can tell you, I was in a plane recently and there were two RCMP officers shepherding an inmate from a court duty in Alberta back to the Northwest Territories. I do know it happens. I’ve seen it personally, and I’ve seen it personally from my experience working at the correctional centre many years ago, that I know that they do this duty occasionally.

What I’m asking for is: Is the Minister willing to do an evaluation of the resources on that particular matter that evaluates the cost effectiveness of taking RCMP off the street, from providing policing, responding to crime and investigating crime, to considering putting the sheriffs into that particular role? They do it in other regions such as all the provinces across Canada. Why can’t we consider the same type of functionality of our sheriff’s office?

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

David Ramsay Kam Lake

I do know and I am aware that the RCMP do provide transport and do that type of work. I’ve seen it myself as well. I will go back to the department, as I mentioned in response to a previous question, and get some further detail on this.

Question 957-17(5): RCMP Prisoner Transport Policy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Ramsay. Final, short supplementary, Mr. Hawkins.