This is page numbers 4621 - 4676 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was communities.

Topics

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4659

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Nunakput.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4659

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, like my colleagues, there is frustration from the southern part of the territory, right to the northern part of the territory, and as well, Mr. Speaker, probably, between the Northwest Territories and the Government of Canada as well, too, when it comes to taking children and care out of the territory. Like Jordan's Principle, we have a federal government and we have the territorial government, but whatever government it may be, it might be a self-government, I'm fighting over who is going to pay the bill for the children while those children suffer and struggle in hospitals and in care around the country.

Mr. Speaker, that is something that we need to work on with the federal government. That is something within the territory that we don't have that much control over, but the Minister and his staff and the department have control over maybe working out with the federal government. The Premier has that power as well, too.

Mr. Speaker, Jordan's Principle is something that affects all of us, being in a territory where the majority of the people are Indigenous people, eight different languages and so forth. It is loud and clear that our needs for ourselves, our children, and the rate of suicides, and the rate of homicides in the territory are rising. I think we need to take a look as to why these are all happening, and how can we work that out to help the cause so that our people live a better quality of life. Mr. Speaker, we are missing all of those pieces in this big system we call the Health and Social Services.

Like some of my colleagues, I believe the system is too massive for one Minister to take on alone. I think, as earlier mentioned, some Ministers take on too much of a workload that they cannot focus, and one of my colleagues mentioned that some Regular MLAs know more about some of the policies than actual the Ministers do in their departments. We are willing to change that. That's true, Mr. Speaker. I get answers from Ministers, "Oh, my god. Geez, I could have asked myself that last week and come up with a better answer." I'm not pointing fingers. I'm just saying that in the reality, in the workplace that we work right here, it's true. Some of us are charged with looking at things that we are passionate about. We don't know everything, but the things that we are passionate about, we can take on and make a difference that way. I think that's how we need to kind of focus and realign our strengths as we move forward.

Mr. Speaker, we need to unify and demand a systemic change internally within the Legislative Assembly, because right now it is not working. It might be working for the departments. It might be working for departmental staff, but it's not serving the people of the Northwest Territories, and those are the children in care that we are talking about right now, Mr. Speaker. There is too much red tape in management and the policies. I remember hearing that some time ago when issues came up, there were more policies put in place, and that is just more jargon and more hoops for people who need to jump through. In a sense, it affects the government's bottom line because, at the end of the day, they're not spending as much but they're keeping up with what they can. For me, that's a lack of capacity, Mr. Speaker.

If we struggle from a lack of capacity, we need to find it elsewhere. We need to ensure that we give the Minister and the Premier and our staff and ourselves the right tools to do that, and I think we're not doing that right now. We might be on our way to doing it but, Mr. Speaker, I think we have a long way to go. It's definitely going to pass this Assembly, like we pass the next Assembly until we get a handle on things, but we need to start moving faster. Every day, I believe I heard that every day or 24 hours, there's $1.3 million spent on help in the Northwest Territories, and we look at our population, Mr. Speaker: is that enough, or do we need to increase that? Or do we need to aim our dollars better to ensure that it's going to the right people? Right now, we're caught up on salaries, and the system, I believe, and I've said this in the past, it's more suited to work around the healthcare professionals rather than the people who actually need the healthcare at times. Mr. Speaker, I encourage that within this arena right here.

Mr. Speaker, I come from an organization in the Inuvialuit Region. We are working on self-government. We are working with the departments to build capacity within everything that we do as Inuvialuit, and I'm sure other Indigenous governments are doing that across the territory. I think we need to utilize this time to revamp how things are working for our children, and use our next leadership forum, and invite the Indigenous leaders around the territory to help us develop the mandate for the next government of the Northwest Territories, because right now, it's not working. We are overloaded with mandate items that each and every one of us bring back from our regions, but how do we make those work together? It's not one size fits all. It needs to be specific for each region.

Mr. Speaker, my question is to myself. I'm sitting here listening to everything. Will a new Minister take over the current Minister's priorities as they move forward? Recently, we had a Cabinet shuffle and, Mr. Speaker, I can tell you that no, they didn't, actually. When certain Ministers swapped portfolios, they didn't take over the priorities of the current Minister or the government that set it in place, which is this arena right here. To me, that's an issue. We need to focus on that. We need to ensure that, when we do changes like this, whether it is a Cabinet shuffle or something within the department, I think we all need to work together on. That is where we get lost.

Sometimes, when we get lost, everything falls through the cracks and usually it's the children who are in care, you know. It's our friends and relatives who are in custody, or even elders who are in elders' homes right now, where in the Northwest Territories, some regions don't have the capacity to house elders who need the care.

Mr. Speaker, the moral of my story is, as such a massive department, what we need to do here is look at how we can improve it. Like what I said earlier, the leadership from my region came to my office this afternoon. We talked and they asked me to work with this Minister. There was a time when I was upset because I felt that, you know, after reading the report and looking at some of the items and some of the things that have come out of it, it is frustrating. How do we work with the Minister so that he can work with us? It's not that, Mr. Speaker. It's that we need to work together regardless of if we want to or not.

This past couple of weeks during this session has been a long one. It has been a tough one, but today, you know, I'm not going to support the motion, Mr. Speaker, because I do believe that we need to work together. There is so much to do within this year until next fall that we have to put our heads together, Mr. Speaker. This is more like a whipping for somebody to say, "Hey, you know what? You need to work with us." That, to me, that is exactly what that is today. I believe that is what we need to do.

Otherwise, if we don't do that, shame on all of us here, you know. We see these two Ministers who have been put on the spotlight today, or for the past few days. I think what we need to do is help the both of them, so they can help all the regions in the Northwest Territories. However we get there, Mr. Speaker, whatever it takes, however we get there, let's do what we need to.

Mr. Speaker, I won't support this motion today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4660

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife South.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4660

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, our guiding principles for consensus government recognizes that a healthy tension between Cabinet and Regular Members is normal, Mr. Speaker. That is evident today. Our debates have not been without their disagreements.

As leaders, we will often be called upon to make difficult decisions; decisions where the path forward is not always clear. There are many priorities and many demands, many things that we want to do for our people. Managing the complex challenges and demands our government faces is a key part of every Minister's job, and there is not always going to be agreement over how that is done or the decisions that are made. I believe Minister Abernethy is doing a good job of facing the many complicated issues and challenges involved in delivering Health and Social Services to all 44,000 Northwest Territories residents in all 33 communities.

The methods for addressing a Minister's performance issues in the consensus system are well-known. As is the tradition in the consensus system, Cabinet works together to make decisions on behalf of residents and carry out the responsibilities that we are each responsible for.

As Premier, I am responsible for providing leadership and management of Cabinet, and I speak frequently with all my Ministers about the work that they are doing. If Members have concerns about how a Minister is performing, they may speak directly to the Minister to raise those concerns. If they feel there are still concerns after speaking with the Minister, Members can always come and speak to me directly. Our process convention also gives Members the option of asking for a fireside chat with me to speak as a group about issues they are concerned about.

I do not believe that action to revoke Minister Abernethy's appointment is warranted. He is an experienced leader in his second term as a Minister and has performed well in several portfolios.

The recent audit of the Child and Family Services System is concerning, but I am satisfied the Minister is taking this issue seriously and has a plan for addressing the concerns raised by the Auditor General. The department has been engaged with the Office of the Auditor General for several months during the development of this audit. They have examined the issues raised by the Auditor General carefully and in detail to develop a management response that is part of the audit report.

The management response lays out how the department will fix the problems identified by the Auditor General. I encourage Members to do their due diligence and hear from the department in detail about the actions they have taken and will continue to take to ensure that children are safe. I understand that Committee has set a meeting for December 12th to review the Auditor General's report with the department. I expect this will be a good opportunity for Members and the public to hear in great depth how the Minister and his department are taking action on this file.

The first audit found that the Northwest Territories' Child and Family Services system needed a complete overhaul, and this Minister undertook those changes recommended by the Office of the Auditor General. The Government of the Northwest Territories responded with Building Stronger Families, a comprehensive response to bring about foundational change in a system according to the Office of the Auditor General's recommendations.

Under Building Stronger Families, the Government of Northwest Territories has taken the time to bring a new legislation and procedures to completely change the orientation of the system from one that apprehended kids to one that is also focused on prevention and providing better supports to families. This is exactly the kind of shift and focus that Minister Jane Philpott has been talking about nationally, in which we have been among the first jurisdiction as to formally implement.

Take a look at other provinces and territories. Children in care is a national issue that we are challenged to address. The department has invested $5 million into putting the systems in place to respond to the 2014 Office of the Auditor General and Building Stronger Families plan. This includes support for the structured decision-making tools and the development of a new information system called Matrix. They will also be requesting resources through the next budgeting cycle to hire more staff.

We have made systemic change to the foundation that require staff to do work in a fundamentally different way. They are the right changes, focused on keeping kids in the communities and in their cultures, but implementing those changes has been challenging for front-line workers in the system.

The department has been monitoring its implementation of the system, including doing its own internal audits, that was telling them the same things the Auditor General learned. They have already brought in changes to ensure they are monitoring the system more closely, more frequently, and are directing systems to hear from front-line workers on implementing challenges on the ground. They have made management changes, are focusing on increased training and support for front-line workers, and are planning to increase the number of workers.

These are all steps that will help the Government of the Northwest Territories ensure it has a high-performing Child and Family Services System that puts the safety of the Northwest Territories' children first.

Cabinet has heard clearly from Members about their frustrations and their concerns. I intend to take what I have heard to heart. We can always do better as Ministers. As Premier, I am committed to doing whatever I can to live up to ours residents' expectations on the provision of good government, and so are all the Members of Cabinet.

Mr. Speaker, Cabinet will be voting against this motion. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4661

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Great Slave.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4661

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you for the opportunity to speak to this motion.

During the speeches today and comments made by Members of this Assembly over the last couple of weeks, it appears that some Members don't believe that I am committed to the CFS file.

Mr. Speaker, I want to ensure Members that this is not the case. I am 100 percent committed to make the necessary systemic and principal changes to Child and Family Services that will move it from a system of apprehension to one focused on prevention, while at the same time protecting children at risk from harm.

During the 16th Assembly, I participated in a review of the Child and Family Services in the Northwest Territories. During that review, I travelled to every region and virtually every community to meet with residents, former CFS clients, families, as well as children at risk. It was an incredibly difficult tour, Mr. Speaker, and at every stop, we heard some of the most horrific stories of how the CFS System had torn apart families, ignored culture, and caused harm. These stories and visits had a profound impact on me, and I made a commitment to the people that I met that I would work hard to change the system. I have done that, and I will still keep doing that. In fact, I will continue to fight to improve this system, whether I am a Minister, a Member, and even after I leave this Assembly and enter the non-political life.

Mr. Speaker, I was proud when the committee came forward in 2010 with the 73 recommendations to improve our system here in the Northwest Territories. In 2011, I was re-elected and honoured to be selected as a Member of Executive Council. In 2013, the Premier announced the Cabinet shuffle, and I did something that nobody does. I asked for Health and Social Services. This is an area that I am incredibly passionate about and feel like I could make a positive difference on this file for the people of the Northwest Territories. On October 2013, I did become the Minister of Health and Social Services.

At pretty much my very first meeting, I asked the then-deputy Minister an important question: where are we with the 73 recommendations? The answer was nowhere. It wasn't a priority. Mr. Speaker, this made me incredibly unhappy, and I felt like the work that we had done had fallen on deaf ears. I immediately directed the department to start putting together a plan to address all of the recommendations. The end result is Building Stronger Families.

While doing the foundational work on Building Stronger Families, the CFS system was also being audited by the Auditor General of Canada. The timing of the Auditor General's audit, in my mind, was good, and we saw the findings, although, at the time, hard to hear, as helpful, and we were able to incorporate their 11 recommendations into the plan for the future of the Child and Family Services system.

In October 2014, Building Stronger Families was released as a five-year action plan to move us forward, and we are currently in year four of that rollout. I still strongly believe that Building Stronger Families is the right plan and that prevention-based system is the right thing to do. As a note, I have always been very clear that the first three or four years would have to be focused on building the foundation necessary to bring about change.

Also, as a note, the TRC report and its recommendations were released in June 2015. We were very happy that the recommendations in the TRC report related specifically to child welfare, which is consistent with the direction outlined in Building Stronger Families. It validated our hard work and reconfirmed the message that we heard from residents throughout the Northwest Territories.

Since the 2014 audit, many things have happened. In 2014, the Auditor General said that we needed to improve accountability, so we appointed and trained assistant directors in each region and made them accountable for Child and Family Services.

We were told to establish compliance audits and learn from them, so we did, and we are.

We were asked to report annually to the Legislative Assembly on the state of Child and Family Services, and we have done so for the past five years.

The Auditor General said that we needed tools to assess longer-term risks to children, so we introduced structured decision-making tools. The use of the structured decision-making tools is allowing us to become more strength-based and more family-oriented.

We were told to improve training, so we revised core training for child protection workers and introduced mandatory supervisor training, and in 2014, staff had access to about 10 training days. Now, staff participates up to 90 training days in communities as well as in classes.

We were told to update our standards and procedures manual. In 2015, the whole manual was rewritten, which included over 200 standards, forms, and tools that are being used to review and update, and they were introduced as part of the new standards.

We were told to develop a process to improve information sharing, so we created a monthly teleconference and annual meeting where key staff can share challenges and best practices, and we have extended that to all staff.

While the OAG made it clear that some of these changes introduced should have been implemented better, and, for the record, we agree, this audit neither reran the full audit from 2014 or passed negative judgement on what we have done. It is unfortunate, because these actions are the actions that form the key foundation pieces that make all of the profound changes that we need to happen possible.

Mr. Speaker, this brings us to where we are today. However, before I start discussing where we are today, I want to take an opportunity to apologize to the families and the children who have asked us to do better. We are going in the right direction, but we have not made the progress that I know you wanted to see. As a system, we will redouble our efforts and make Building Stronger Families a reality for you and for your families.

Mr. Speaker, the 2018 Auditor General's report on Child and Family Services was gut-wrenching for us all. I was deeply disappointed and concerned when I saw the OAG conclusion that there were areas where we were worse, specifically that we haven't managed risk as well as we should have.

Mr. Speaker, every person working on Child and Family Services, including me, wants to do everything possible to make sure that we are meeting our key responsibilities for the protection and well-being of children, young people, and families. The question that preoccupies me, and I know it is on the minds of all of our staff, is: are kids safe? I talked to our people on the frontlines, and I know how incredibly hard they work and that they are committed to making sure that our children are safe. It is our job to support them to do this, and we need to do it better.

The OAG report is a critical part of helping us do it better, and I thank them for their incredible work. Looking back at the 2014 Auditor General's report, we did implement every recommendation that we received, and through our Building Stronger Families plan, we brought in massive changes to the system, and we did this to provide better support to families and vulnerable children, who we serve.

I remain convinced that we are doing the right things, but it is equally clear that good intentions, ambitious plans, and hard work can only carry us so far. Where we have fallen short as a system is how we implement change, and I want to be clear, while the 2008 report does not find fault with the direction and intention of our actions, it clearly shows that we need more focus on how we are embedding quality practices into our organizational structure and that we need to improve our staff capacity and engagement to ensure that the massive changes we have been undertaking are sustained and lead to improved services.

This report has clearly validated that the system needed a better approach to resourcing, managing, and structuring and sustaining a massive change that we have embarked upon. We have been doing the right things, but we haven't focused enough in the right way.

Mr. Speaker, my department has accepted every recommendation in the OAG report, and we have provided a detailed response, which I encourage everybody to read, which moves us beyond simply saying, "We agree," and demonstrates the tangible actions that we have started and will continue. As you have already heard me say, the OAG findings aligned with our internal audit findings in key areas that we have been working on since May to implement actions to address these findings.

Mr. Speaker, we did not wait for the OAG to take action. I would like to share with you actions that my department has already taken and has planned to take moving forward.

Our 2016-2017 internal audits and executive summary, which I shared with Members of the Standing Committee on Social Development in April 2017, identified quality issues where we needed to take actions and improvements. I saw the letter again today. We sent it in 2017. I heard Members saying that they didn't see it, so we have to figure out where it is and why they didn't see it, because I sent it. Based on those audits, and the ongoing work with the Auditor General, we put together a quality improvement plan.

So what have we done? As a system, we have been moving together to develop and act on this quality improvement plan. Much has been done over the past six months. We established a system-wide coordinating team to develop and implement actions to address high-risk quality issues.

We strengthened the assistant directors' forum to enhance their capacity and role clarity and oversight over the entire system.

Using the Matrix system, which was implemented late in 2017, we have implemented a process of quality reviews in areas where risk has been identified as highest by the OAG. A quality review provides real-time information to frontline staff and management about the performance of regions and key indicators. Starting four months ago, these reviews are now provided on a monthly basis, and I look forward to sharing those with committee as we go through the review in December.

We have established a robust training team of four staff dedicated to improving clinical training of staff, and trainers are located throughout the territories. To address the issues with supervision, a clinical supervision model has already been finalized, and training is being planned and will be completed by the end of December. We have improved our out-of-territory treatment approach by redesigning work flow, building a database, and preparing agreements for all 40 clients in out-of-territory care.

Just for clarity, 20 of the children in out-of-territory care are actually with their parents. They are living with their parents in the south. The other 20 are in facilities where we have checked, and there are clear guidelines. Those clear guidelines exist should a child go AWOL. We have established a specialized caseload for foster care as a territorial approach and now have identified positions in each region and department. Four of these seven positions are filled.

We reviewed all 22 guardianship cases, and I can assure the honourable Members that, in each case, our staff with delegated authority worked with the support of legal counsel to enable family Members or other agreed-upon caregivers to assume interim or full guardianship under the Children's Law Act. All agreements were with full parental support. All agreements engaged legal counsel for the director and the parents, and in most cases, the children's lawyer. I can assure Members that these children were placed with known and trusted caregivers.

Mr. Speaker, I have just given you a list of some of what we have done to address the issues of the OAG report, but I know what you're most interested in is what we haven't done and why. What we have done hasn't been enough.

Mr. Speaker, some of my colleagues have asked why I didn't share these issues sooner, and I've been clear and honest with colleagues and the public regarding issues facing our system. In April of this year, I shared with the Standing Committee on Social Programs a report summarizing the findings of the 2016-2017 audit process within CFIS, and I recently said in this Assembly and tabled the director's report and clearly described some of our shortcomings and talked about areas that we clearly need to make some improvement.

I also advised colleagues and the public that we have much work left to do here in this House and in committee while reviewing our business plans. Our updated audit approach is about continuous quality improvement and building on the strength to develop a better system.

We haven't done a comparative audit, like the OAG, because we haven't had a baseline due to the newness of our internal audit process. Thus, we have not produced reports that would identify our performance at different points in time. That said, the department is working on an approach to public reporting of key indicators that will be more clear and more transparent.

Mr. Speaker, I know that all Members are aware that the OAG process is very protected and very regimented. All staff have been engaged in the review in the early drafts of the findings and recommendations. We are bound by confidentiality. I was, of course, aware of the key findings in the department's planning, but I would have been breaching the confidence of the OAG to disclose any details of their findings, and it could have been seen as a breach or an attempt to upend the OAG by providing significant details of our own audit that were clearly aligned with that of the OAG. Mr. Speaker, it's frustrating, I know. I hear the Members, but I respect the processes that we are bound by here, and I will honour them.

Many of you ask me: why didn't I seek resources? Mr. Speaker, we invested over $5 million in new resources to support improvements in Child and Family Services, and this was the total cost of implementing the structured decision making and Matrix. As a Minister, I took advice that the implementation of these systems would have positive impact on the workloads of staff and would change the nature of the workflow. For this reason, the opinion I received was that we should wait until full implementation. That means getting SMD Matrix in place so that we would be in a better position to do diligent and appropriate workload analysis, and that we could then use them to identify the resources that we truly need. At the time, it seemed logical, and I felt like the appropriate balance of doing the right thing would be prudent and responsible.

However, earlier this year, based on feedback from the department staff and staff from Health and Social Services, I became incredibly uncomfortable with this approach and directed the department to prepare a submission for business planning to seek new resources for more frontline staff.

The department drawing on the Child Welfare League of Canada Report and Caseloads Standards from the Child Welfare League of America completed a caseload review. While it isn't our convention to speak of matters in business planning process as colleagues, colleagues know we are seeking new resources in this important area and are proposing increases through budgetary processes for the next fiscal year. With the benefit of hindsight and finding of the OAG report, I obviously wish that we'd ask for resources to support frontline caregivers much sooner, and I'm deeply frustrated that the information I needed to provide the realization and provide direction was not available sooner.

Mr. Speaker, I saw a problem with our approach, and I took action. Mr. Speaker, in addition to the actions we have taken, there is much more work that needs to be done, and we will be compiling a focused two-year action plan to improve quality quickly. These action plans will be discussed in detail during the meeting with the Standing Committee on Government Operations in December following our well-established processes for reviewing and responding to OAG reports here in this Legislative Assembly. For the sake of time, I won't go into detail now.

Mr. Speaker, since the release of the audit, I have tried to openly share with Members what has been done and tackle head-on some of the concerns I have heard from colleagues in the hallway. Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, CUPE is not always the best way to get detailed information out. There are processes in dealing with the OAG audits, and I feel that we must refocus and get back to the established processes. This is the process the legislature designated to ensure Members have the opportunity to learn more, ask important questions, provide valuable insight, feedback, and make recommendations that will help shape the improvements that we collectively make in this area.

I look forward to your thoughts and recommendations through that important and well-established process, and I want to be clear, this essential work and the OAG's report is critical to making a stronger system.

This has been truly a gut-wrenching experience for all involved, but as leader, it is my job to tackle it head-on, not take a back seat; own it; and ensure that we learn from the experience and move forward and build our foundation we have put in place over the four years to do better. As Minister, I am completely invested in improving Child and Family Services in the Northwest Territories and to lead this system through quality improvement journey that we started since 2014 and are currently strengthening.

We are in the fourth year of a five-year action plan which will now need to be modified. We know Matrix system change does not occur as an event. It's a process that takes time, focus, periodic stock-taking, and course correction. This audit is a call to action, and it shows us where we need to tighten up.

Mr. Speaker, late last week, Senator Murray Sinclair said that "residential school monster now lives in the child welfare system in Canada," and I completely agree with him. That is consistent with what we heard during our review of the Child and Family Services system in 2010. It is why we brought forward the Building Stronger Families. This is why we are focusing on families and prevention. It's the right thing to do.

Without question, we need to do better as we continue to roll out the new innovative model. Mr. Speaker, I work hard with respect to Standing Committee on Social Programs. Together, we have been able to make a number of positive changes on files that we've worked on together to benefit all Northerners. They know that I'm open, approachable, willing to work with them, and am able to find compromise and solutions for the benefit of residents of the Northwest Territories. Touring the massive Child and Family Services system has proven incredibly difficult, but together, and all together and with the help of this very heartbreaking audit, we can make a stronger Child and Family Services system in the Northwest Territories together that meets the needs of children and families.

Mr. Speaker, the system will never be without risk, but we need to work harder to mitigate risk that exists. This is what the Auditor General told us. I hope that Members are willing to continue to work with me as Minister for the last 11 months of this term so that we don't lose momentum and can make this happen.

In closing, I would like to once again apologize to the children and families who asked us to do better, and reconfirm my commitment to redouble our efforts to make Building Stronger Families a reality for you and your families. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4665

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. By the authority given to me as Speaker by Motion 7-18(3), I hereby authorize the House to sit beyond the daily hour of adjournment to consider the businesses before the House.

To the motion. I will allow the mover to make their closing comments.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4665

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have to give credit to the Minister. That's leadership. He stood up, took responsibility, and apologized to the children and the families that have been affected. I thank the Minister for that. My problem, though, is we still did not put resources to it. We are going to wait until next year to start this, so that's another six months that Cabinet has to wait because they should be bringing a supp to the floor and saying, "Hey, we need to put some money to this. We need to hire more people, more social workers there."

I know it's great that we are doing it next term or next year. That is great, but it doesn't deal with the issue now. I put it onto Cabinet. The Minister couldn't do a good enough job to get it there, but this is a crisis. We need to find issues and find money. The Cabinet has to wear that if they don't bring a supp and they wait for the business plans to go through 2019-2020. At the end of the day, it's about the youth. I appreciate the Minister for being so passionate and carrying and that.

At this point in time, Mr. Speaker, I'd like to have a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 24-18(3): Revocation of Appointment of the Honourable Member for Great Slave to the Executive Council, Defeated
Motions

Page 4665

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a record vote. The motion is on the floor. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Motions

October 31st, 2018

Page 4665

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4665

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4665

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave, the Member for Yellowknife South, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4665

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the recorded votes: seven in favour, 11 against, zero abstention. The motion is defeated.

---Defeated

Motions. Item 18, first reading of bills. Minister for Municipal and Community Affairs.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 9-1-1 Act
First Reading Of Bills

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Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Range Lake, that Bill 31, Northwest Territories 911 Act, be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 9-1-1 Act
First Reading Of Bills

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. The motion is non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Masi. Bill 31 has had its first reading. First reading of bills. Minister of Health and Social Services.