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This is from the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was housing.

Topics

Remembrance Day
Members' Statements

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Speaker, it has been nearly 100 years since the end of the First World War. Around the world, it is known as Armistice Day, Memorial Day, National Independence Day in Poland, and in the Commonwealth as Remembrance Day.

November 11th is the day for us to solemnly reflect upon the sacrifices made by those who preceded us, making a decision that many of us will hopefully never have to. Remembrance Day is a chance for us to show thanks to those who are to this day buried in lands not of their birth and far from their homes and families. It is an opportunity to share with those who were fortunate enough to have returned our thanks and reverence, while remembering all those who were left behind.

Remembrance Day is not about the glorification of armed conflict. Rather, it is an opportunity for us to show reverence and respect to our elders who have made a decision harder than many of us will ever have to face; to go off beyond the horizon to defend that which they hold dear, to leave behind compatriots and to return to a home having experience they can share with oh so few. Many returning veterans are burdened with traumas which few in the general public fully comprehend. Veterans should rightly be proud of their experience and achievements, and we in the public should not be allowed to have them forgotten.

Mr. Speaker, I want to take this moment to ask all Members in this House, as well as Northerners, to take a moment to reflect, however they best see fit, upon the sacrifices of veterans past, present, and future. We must never cease to show our gratitude to our service men and women, for even today these words still ring true: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Remembrance Day
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Members' Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, [Translation] they are talking about the carbon tax today, so I am going to ask the Minister: the tanks that are getting delivered into the communities, we are talking about it. They are saying that it was not to be taxed the way they are working. I don't understand exactly what is going on. The people who deliver the fuel within a community or the boats that are delivering it, maybe they are the ones who are paying the tax. The heating fuel is not supposed to be taxed for the people that are hunting and living on the land. [Translation ends]

[Microphone not on] ... on a couple of questions my constituents have over carbon tax. I know that some of the fuels will be exempt. I will be asking the Minister of Finance about what fuels will be exempt. My understanding is maybe fuels that are needed to travel, but I'm not sure if that includes travelling on the land for individuals to go out hunting for the elders in the community, or if it is only specific to fuels that are used for boats and ships or airplanes, for people who have to travel.

In at least one of my communities, we have no highway. Then, in three of the communities that I represent, there are highways, and people use their vehicles to hunt. I don't know if that means that there will be an exemption on the gas that they purchase in order to go hunting.

[Translation] And the people who are travelling, going out on the land to heal themselves, either by boat or Skidoo, going to some of the cultural activities out on the land, and the gas that is being used for those trips in the Skidoos. I don't understand if it's being taxed or not, too, so I'm going to ask the Minister of Finance today. Thank you very much. [Translation ends]

Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Kole Crook Fiddle Association
Members' Statements

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Fiddle music came to the NWT with the voyageurs and has been ingrained in northern culture and music since the first traders. Angus Beaulieu, Stanley Lafferty, and Colin Adjun are some of the best known, but there are many other fine northern fiddlers. Kole Crook represented the next generation.

Kole was a much-loved young fiddler known for his gentlemanly ways and selflessness and generosity of spirit. He was a deeply spiritual man, who lived his Christian faith by sharing himself, his money, and means with whoever might need it. He spent much time with the elders, observing their wisdom and teachings.

Kole travelled from community to community, introducing children to the joy of fiddling and bringing the benefits of music to the youth of his communities. He led by example. With youth, Kole always had time to teach children on how to fiddle, keeping the music tradition alive. With elders, Kole helped them with their chores, listening to their stories, and maintained traditional values. All generations and ages were brought together through music he played.

Kole's death on his way to a New Year's event in Tulita was a tragic loss, felt by all those who knew him, met him, or heard his music. Kole passed on his joyful music playing generous spirit and sharing of musical tradition lived on through the Kole Crook Fiddle Association. They continue to change young people's lives forever through the music.

Since 2003, the association has been actively continuing the work Kole did in so many of the communities. Youth and elders connecting in performance with the youth at the elder care centres is always a magical experience.

Communities, concerts for the whole families, toe tapping, jigging, and laughing together. The annual January jamboree in Fort Simpson brings nearly 100 fiddlers together for a fun-filled weekend of fiddling and dancing.

The association has donated fiddles and taught many NWT communities over the years. They have established fiddle programs in 17 communities. The association has been moving forward on a wing and a prayer. A friend's kitchen became a fiddler's repair shop. The association's president kept a room in her home for teachers and lent out a car for teaching tourists. Angus and Dorothy Beaulieu donated accommodations. Buffalo Air donated free flights for the association's teachers.

There has been Arts Council and MACA support for the Kole Crook Fiddle Association, but much more each could be done with the help of this Assembly to support the organization fully. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Kole Crook Fiddle Association
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Trapping Season in the Beaufort Delta
Members' Statements

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today is the opening season in the Beaufort Delta for trapping. Many people are very excited to go out on the land and continue our traditional way of life. Please be safe as our warmer temperatures and swift water can make the ice unsafe on the rivers, creeks, and rivers as you begin to open up your trap lines and start setting traps.

Mr. Speaker, it is pretty neat to see that my constituents continue to this day to bring their children with them and teach them our traditional way of life. Also, Mr. Speaker, we have some elders who are in their 70s and 80s who are still trapping to this day. They are true role models to our younger generation. They are teaching our next generation that, with true trapping, you can not only provide for your family, but also live a healthy way of life. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Trapping Season in the Beaufort Delta
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Carbon Pricing
Members' Statements

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the issue of carbon pricing and how to encourage reduced use of fossil fuels takes up a lot of space in our national debate and, of course, it's a popular topic in this House, as well. These are vital issues for many reasons. I would like to give my assessment of where we are at in the NWT and where we need to go.

Cabinet announced details in July of a scheme that would meet the federal requirements of a carbon tax. Cabinet said its made-in-the-NWT framework takes into account our cost of living by establishing a system of immediate tax exemptions and cost of living rebates. To offset increased costs, the GNWT created a cost of living offset to refund the tax to individuals and families.

I had hoped for a more comprehensive package of measures, including dramatic increases in rebates and incentives to improve the energy efficiency of homes and buildings. Increases to energy alliance programs have come thanks to new federal dollars. I applaud the GNWT's announcement this week of an additional $1.8 million under the new Government Greenhouse Gas Grant Program. That is progress, but we need much more ambitious supports.

I am also convinced industry is willing to meet the low carbon challenge. The Canadian Mining Association is on the record in support of "a broad-based carbon price that is applicable to all sectors of the Canadian economy." One of our mines took action more than a decade ago with a big investment in wind power generation because this makes economic sense. I believe the industry is willing to do more to meet shareholder demands that they take action on greenhouse gas emissions. As to the notion that carbon pricing is a job killer and stunts economic growth, the facts soundly refute this misconception.

When I lend an ear to this issue in the NWT, I am not hearing the public outcry about a carbon tax. I believe our residents have the learned and factual warnings of the extraordinary hardships facing our planet as a result of climate change, and they are willing to act. What is needed is inspirational leadership, not fearful hesitancy. For the sake of our children's future, we must keep our international promises and work towards a lower carbon future. I will be asking our government how they can better support our response to climate change. Mahsi.

Carbon Pricing
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Hay River North.

Hay River Town Council Elects
Members' Statements

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, November 6th, Hay River's new town council will be sworn in. While there will be some familiar faces, six of the nine members are newly elected. That means we will be saying goodbye to quite a few people, and I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to Donna Lee Jungkind, Vince McKay, Jason Coakwell, Roger Candow, and Mike Mahar for their service over the past three years.

I especially have to thank our outgoing mayor, Brad Mapes, who has always been willing to work closely with me during my time as MLA so we could advance the interests of our community. I look forward to continuing this good working relationship with mayor-elect, Kandis Jameson, who I would like to congratulate on her election by acclamation.

Congratulations, as well, to returning councillors, Steve Anderson and Keith Dohey, and newly elected councillors, Robert Bouchard, Jeff Groenewegen, Emily Chambers, Linda Duford, Joe Melanson, and Brian Willows. They will face many challenging issues in the coming years, including the power franchise decision, which will have ramifications for the entire territory; the economic growth that will be associated with Pine Point Mines, the pellet mill, the long-term care unit, and all the associated spin-offs; as well as our future population growth and development issues.

I know they are up to the challenge, and I look forward to working with them. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Passing of Agnes Sutherland
Members' Statements

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, people in Fort Smith and throughout the Northwest Territories were saddened to hear of the passing in St. Albert, Alberta, of Agnes Sutherland, in August of this year at the age of 92.

Sister Agnes Sutherland was born in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, in 1926 and joined the Grey Nuns in 1943, pronouncing her vows in 1946. She was a teacher in St. Albert, St. Paul, Fort McMurray, and Fort Smith, where she lived for many years. She also worked as a religious education specialist and found time to write several books.

She was an advocate for women seeking shelter when fleeing abusive relationships and was a driving force in the establishment of a shelter in Fort Smith which bears her name, Sutherland House. She was also a strong advocate for seniors and those with disabilities. She leaves many friends and admirers.

Mr. Speaker, a long life well lived. Thank you.

Passing of Agnes Sutherland
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Our condolences to the family members and also to the community, as well. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

November 1st, 2018

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Earlier today in the House, we acknowledged the 30-year anniversary of Air Tindi. Today, we have with us in the House and I want to recognize them: President Al Martin; we have HR Manager Belinda Beck; and we have Vice-President Trevor Wever from Air Tindi. Welcome and thank you for being here.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.