This is page numbers 3795 – 3814 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The Indigenous involvement in the project is considered through the use of the Aboriginal opportunities consideration within the federal government processing system, and we will have to work with the contractor to the ensure that they recognize that there are a lot of folks up here who can do the work and try to utilize them. I think it would be beneficial for the project and beneficial for the locals.

As far as flowing the money through the GNWT, I mean, it is a federal responsibility, the cleanup of Giant Mine. I take the Member's point, though, where we would be much more recognizing of the fact that we need a lot of northern involvement. I can assure Members that we have had some updates from the contractor. I am sure, as we go into the process, we will have more updates from the contractor, and we will continue to make our views known. I am sure, it just being awarded so recently, there is still some work they have to do in identifying potential businesses that they could utilize during the construction of this or the remediation work that is going on. As we become updated, I will keep the Members of this House updated, as well.

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I would like to thank the Minister for that. I am just worried, though, that, with the $600 million contract already out there, that this is starting to slip away from us. So, later today, I am going to table a letter from the Giant Mine Oversight Board that is quite critical of the current approach on socio-economic benefits by the federal government: there is no overall plan; engagement is encouraged instead of real targets; non-Indigenous Northerners have not been included in the approach to date; no economic impacts are predicted; and so on, but, perhaps most importantly, a collaborative consultative process is recommended to develop a socio-economic benefits plan. Does the Minister support a broad consultative process to develop a socio-economic benefits plan for the Giant Mine remediation project?

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

We are always supportive of anything that allows us to take advantage of northern business opportunities. The Giant Mine remediation is very complex in operations, so, as I said before, we will work before with the main construction manager. We will make our views known. I am sure they are doing their due diligence now. If there are opportunities to utilize northern businesses as part of the remediation, then it would benefit both the project and the northern business. Again, we realize that there is a lot of money that is being put into this remediation, and I will assure the Members that, between me and the Ministers of ITI and all other departments in the interdepartmental working group, we will reach out and see if we can get some information as quickly as possible. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I would like to thank the Minister again for that response, but, you know, this remediation project is clearly the beginning of a lot more work that is going to happen here. Clearly, there is an emerging remediation economy that, given the requirements of the devolution agreement and new accounting practice where containment sites are entered into public accounts as liabilities until they are remediated, I am wondering what our government is doing in terms of things like possibly reorienting the Mine Training Society towards remediation. What are we doing in terms of trades apprenticeships and so on? Can the Minister tell us what the GNWT is doing to get better prepared for the coming environmental remediation economy and how we can better get prepared for all the remediation work that's about to begin over the next several years? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The Member's point is well taken. We do recognize that there is a remediation economy that is coming. I think we have seen a demonstration of that on the Canol Trail, for example, but that one, too, they brought, I believe, a southern company in, and that was through the federal government.

We have to ensure, and as much like HazMat remediation in units that were built a number of years ago, we see that as another economy because the Housing Corporation unfortunately can't take down a lot of their houses until they have HazMat remediation. I do know a few businesses that have taken some HazMat remediation training, which is good. I think, as we get into more of the environmental remediation, the remediation type work, we should encourage more business out there to seek the expertise that they can take advantage of all the work, because I think I heard the Member say at one time there were like 700 sites that may need to be remediated. We need to position the people in the Northwest Territories and the business in the Northwest Territories. I think it's a broad discussion we need to have as a Cabinet if there are any training opportunities that we could possibly have or people taking across the Northwest Territories, so it is a whole new economy, and I think we need to position ourselves and our people to be the ones that are best prepared for it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 245-18(3): Giant Mine Remediation Project Socio-Economic Benefits
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

March 12th, 2018

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I have a few more questions for my colleague, the Minister responsible for the Status of Women. I heard her say that the campaign schools were being offered by the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs in the short term. I'm wondering if she has prepared over the long term to commit to taking the campaign schools back to the Status of Women and asking them to re-tool the content so that it reaches people who are running for all orders of government? Thank you.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the Status of Women.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As stated earlier, we are just in the stage of renewing it and making it fit the people more appropriately. We will be doing an evaluation at that point, where we will be deciding what we are going to do with it. I also want to say, though, that we are looking at expanding it so that it can meet more of the needs of people and addressing municipal Indigenous governments, for example, but also the budget, we want to make sure that we can do it the most cost-effective way to be able to reach the most communities. It's important. These are important schools. They actually make a difference in women's lives. We are looking at it from not only one aspect, but from many aspects.

Once we are finished that work, I would be more than interested to work with the Status of Women to actually see if they can take this on again because, as I have stated many, many times, my understanding is that the Status of Women has a defined role and part of that is supporting the Minister of the Status of Women. It would be just logical, Mr. Speaker, that they would assist me in that work. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate the Minister's answer. Where I'm coming from is that I think, as a matter of principle, we don't want civil servants to train future politicians. We want that to happen at arm's length. The Status of Women has have lots of experience in this area, and I think that, once they are back up to speed, they should be the go-to group.

Now, there was a review of the campaign schools in 2017. It has never been made public. Can the Minister commit to making it public?

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

I won't make that commitment at this time. I need to go back and look at it. The review that we did was internal, and it wasn't actually done under my direction. It was just an employee who offered to assist us with that, so I have to go back and look at it to determine if that was a formal report or was that just a volunteer who was assisting us with looking at making the campaign school better, so I'm not sure if it was a paid position or just a volunteer.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

To refresh the memory of the Minister, this work was undertaken by a member of the Department of Executive. She was the paid government employee working on the evaluation of the campaign school. I wonder if the Minister could take that into account when she's asking the question of her staff about making the report public?

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Absolutely, I will take that into consideration. I just want to note that a lot of people who work for the government actually have a real concern. They want more women in leadership. My understanding, and I will check on that because I may be wrong, is that the majority, I think all of them except for my special advisor, actually were not paid for any of the work that they have done for the campaign schools. It's tended to be on the weekends on our own times, so I will confirm if that is true, because it's important to note. If it is not true, I will come back to the speaker and stand up formally and make a formal clarification.

Question 246-18(3): Role Of Status Of Women Council In Campaign Schools
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.