This is page numbers 5453 - 5490 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was assembly. View the webstream of the day's session.

Topics

Government of the Northwest Territories Legislative Agenda
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Mackenzie Delta Youth On-the-Land Experience
Members' Statements

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wish to acknowledge the youth of Fort MacPherson who decided, above all odds, to hike from Curtain Mountain some 90 miles through the mountains and creeks to Fort MacPherson.

This idea came from the youth, for the youth. Mr. Speaker, there are many opportunities for our youth to go out on the land and learn. This project is unique, where the youth definitely wanted to be out on the land, but using a different approach to reviving their culture. This is where it all started. A trek would be best, where they would snowmobile through the mountains to Curtain Mountain, and then walk back to town.

Mr. Speaker, the trek took six days; five snowmobiles were spotters. This was challenging and exciting. Each of the youth had mentors. Each day, something new was taught. They learned traditional skills, how to read the weather, but, most of all, basic survival skills.

Congratulations to the following; you have paved the way for more adventures for our youth: Dean Charlie, Marvin Snowshoe, Jordan Stewart, Abraham Stewart, Edwin Kaye, Joe Kaye, John Francis, Robert James Francis, Angel Koe, and Donna Snowshoe. They all arrived home to a warm welcome from the community, safe and sound, happy to be home, and feeling proud of themselves, as they should be. Keep up the good work, as you are our future leaders. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mackenzie Delta Youth On-the-Land Experience
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Investment in Infrastructure for Accessible Child Care
Members' Statements

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Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I have spoken many times in this House about the need for accessible and affordable childcare. It is one of our mandate commitments, but during the life of this Assembly there has been a growing crisis of supply of licensed childcare here in Yellowknife.

There are two issues that stand in the way of easing this supply problem. The first is that licensed childcare provides modest income to providers. This is the reason that licensed childcare is usually provided by non-profits. The introduction of JK has taken a toll, even on non-profit childcare. It took kids over three out of the mix, leaving the youngest kids, who need more staff to care for them. The whole sector has downsized. Unless non-profit providers are able to bring significant economies of scale to the table, like the YK Day Care did by offering 100 spaces, it's difficult for them to break even. In short, ECE has disrupted the supply of licensed childcare for children ages zero to three, killing even limited profitability.

Mr. Speaker, the second issue is finding a space for childcare that meets building and fire code requirements. These are exacting and appropriate standards to ensure our children are safe. I recently learned that there is no space available for rent in Yellowknife that meets these requirements. Renovating buildings to meet the code is expensive. There is often hazardous material abatement involved, as well as improved fire separation, walls, and floors.

Mr. Speaker, if there is no appropriate space in Yellowknife, what are the chances of their being space ready to move into in the regional centres, let alone in the small communities? This is a significant problem, because 11 communities don't have established licenses childcare.

The repercussions of this crisis are significant. Both parents and caregivers can't keep working, and they are taking their taxable income with them. Or worse, they are making plans to leave the NWT so they can continue their careers while having easier access to licensed childcare.

Mr. Speaker, the bottom line is here is that, in order for NWT residents to access childcare, the government is going to have to invest in infrastructure. The cost of constructing or renovating buildings is beyond the reach of non-profit budgets. The Minister has said she was working on a comprehensive plan to make childcare more accessible. I am looking forward to hearing how. Mahsi.

Investment in Infrastructure for Accessible Child Care
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Health Centre Practices regarding Acetaminophen
Members' Statements

March 14th, 2019

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. About a month ago my colleague from Mackenzie Delta talked about healthcare in our small communities. He mentioned something that I've heard about before myself; people bringing their concerns to the health centre, only to get sent home with Tylenol pills. It left me wondering not only if people are getting the care they need, but if they're getting the advice they need when it comes to drugs like Tylenol?

Because Tylenol is a common brand and easy to get, and because it's not like other kinds of painkillers like Advil or Motrin, which can hurt the stomach, you might think that it's pretty harmless. But there are still some pretty serious risks, and I'm concerned that these risks aren't well enough understood.

The main ingredient in Tylenol, as well as many other painkillers, allergy medications, and sleeping aids, is acetaminophen. It breaks down in your body, and one of the by-products is a substance that's highly toxic to the liver, even more so if you've been drinking alcohol. If you take more than you're supposed to, take it for longer than you're supposed to, or drink too much before or while you're taking it, the health consequences can be serious; liver damage, liver failure, or even death, although those cases are rare.

I recognize that we need to take charge of our own health, which means reading dosage instructions and finding out how new medication might interact with current medication. That's good common sense.

Mr. Speaker, my challenge is the kind of direction people in our small communities might be getting from staff at the health centres. These staff have a great deal of authority on their side, and it can be very intimidating to question a nurse or doctor, or to ask for a different option when offered a simple painkiller. Even if you do ask, you're not guaranteed to get the help you're looking for. There was a case like this in Wrigley last fall, and we know from the work that the Department of Health and Social Services is doing on cultural safety that many people in the Northwest Territories often just don't feel safe or respected in our own healthcare system.

I'd like to find out more about the policies and practices in place around the use of these kinds of drugs in our health centres, so I'll have some questions for the Minister later today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Health Centre Practices regarding Acetaminophen
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nunakput.

Reflection on Budget Session
Members' Statements

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Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd just like to reflect back a little bit on this budget process. We were off to a late start, and especially on an O and M budget like this, I believe that we held back a few things, and when we hold back things, we hold back the government, we hold back communities in the Northwest Territories.

Mr. Speaker, this is not a capital budget, where we could sit down and lobby, and likely barter with Cabinet. I think this last process, here, the very last one of this Assembly, when you hold something to the last minute, there is no room for capacity, there is no room for growth, and there is no room for any other issues that may come up during this Assembly. This last one proved that, Mr. Speaker. I see in the future, in the 19th Assembly, I hope that O and M budgets get the time that they need to start properly and promptly, so that residents and MLAs who have families, MLAs who travel from out of the capital, have time to do that and stay fresh and healthy while we're going through this lengthy process. That will give us time to focus on the bills that are upcoming this spring. I know we'll all go home and spend some much-needed time with our family before we gear up.

I'd also like to thank all of my colleagues for the hard work that they have done, on both sides. There are a lot of bills, a lot of leadership, and, Mr. Speaker, there are a lot of things that we can improve on, as well, during this Assembly as we move forward.

Mr. Speaker, I complained earlier about the progress. Now, I'd like to also commend the finance Minister, the Member for Twin Lakes, for his speech yesterday. I almost had a tear in my eye. If I knew him another year, I would be crying right there beside him. Mr. Speaker, that shows integrity, that shows honesty, and that shows commitment, so I'd like to commend the Minister on that, and I wish him all the best this spring.

Mr. Speaker, I see him finishing very well in this Assembly. I'd like for all of our colleagues here to finish this Assembly very well, and I just wish everyone good health this spring. Thank you to all the Pages who have come, there are a couple from Tuktoyaktuk here, as well as their chaperone and everybody who has supported us through all this time.

Mr. Speaker, our families, our wives, our husbands, and our partners have all given us the strength that we need to move forward, so I would just like to wish everyone a good spring. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Reflection on Budget Session
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Members' statements. Item 9, returns to oral questions. Item 10, recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Colleagues, I am pleased to draw Members' attention to the presence in the Gallery today, with us is Pascal Bornoz, Consul General of Switzerland, on the occasion of his second visit to the Northwest Territories.

Accompanying the Consul General is his wife, Mrs. Maria Elena Bornoz-Kalin. Please join me in welcoming them to the House this afternoon.

On a different note, we did talk about possibly coming back for a third term with the new government, meeting our new government. Masi.

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I'd like to welcome the following people from the Foster Family Coalition who are with us here today: Dawn Pottinger, who is the president; Tammy Roberts, the executive director, Korry Garvey; Meagan McDougall; and Pat Gallagher. Thanks for all you do.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Thank you. Member for Hay River North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to welcome Max and Julia Trennert to the gallery. It's always nice to have people from Hay River here, especially when we're up here for so long. It really makes it feel like home, so welcome.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Member for Range Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to once again recognize a constituent, a Page of ours from Range Lake, Brooke Vallis, and, of course, all the other Pages who have done a fantastic job. I really want to pick out Brooke because, even though it's the second time I've recognized her, as the Minister of the Status of Women, I'm hoping that this is the beginning of a long-time look at what you can be when you decide. This is a viable career that I'd like you for you to consider, as well, entering politics. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.