This Hansard has not been finalized - this is the "Blues" in Parliamentary speak, or unedited transcript in regular speak.

This Hansard is the unedited transcript and will be replaced by the final copy soon (generally within 5 business days). In the meantime, direct quotes should not be used, when the final is published it will seamlessly replace this unedited copy and any existing links should still work.

This is from the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was public.

Topics

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

We have three weeks left in this Assembly. I am not going to make big commitments to actually doing more projects. I recognize that we have to leave room for the other ones. I can't commit to doing a full review of education in the Sahtu. What I can say, though, is that it is needed. It is not only needed in the Sahtu. It is needed right across the Northwest Territories. I don't know who will be in the House, but I am hopeful that one of the Regular MLAs or Cabinet will actually grab this the Assembly and bring it forward because I think it is time.

It is time that our whole Education Act and our whole system was looked at with the understanding that self-government have the right to draw down. Indigenous governments have the right to have a say in how their services are provided to the people. I do think that we have to look at the structure. We have to look at the act in the next Assembly would be my preference, to make sure that we are engaging as appropriate.

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thanks to the Minster for the response. My third question is: what actions are temporarily being done for the department to transition education or improvements, recognizing the gaps to the 19th Assembly?

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

As stated, again, we can't really say what the 19th Assembly will take on. That is not our role, but I am hopeful that education will be on the priority list for the next Assembly. We need to work better. We are failing at our children. Our graduation rates are low. Our early developmental index is coming in low. It is not okay. Our children are our future. We keep saying that. If we really believe that as a society, we have to put our energy, we have to put resources behind that and the next government has to focus more on that.

I just recently learned, actually, that not all district education authorities actually have long-term plans. Some of them just have annual plans. That is not okay. How can you actually do a strategic plan if you don't have long-term plans? We have a lot of work to do. I am the first to admit that. Every day I come across, I am finding more and more issues. I am hoping that education will take a strong focus in the next Assembly. If I am here or any Members are here, please put it forward on the priorities because we need to do better. We can do better. We need to do better. Children are our future. We owe it to them.

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Sahtu.

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Thanks to the response from the Minister. This leads me to my last question. We did a number of consultations these past summer months, in particular, a conference forum we had with the leadership of the Sahtu and Deline, at which time, we had learned a number of weaknesses and gaps in the current delivery system.

Recognizing those weaknesses or needs for improvement, will the Minister commit to issuing a letter or issuing a suggestion in a transitional report from the department to the 19th Assembly to have the 19th Assembly revisit the reform of the Education Act so it will be brought up to today's standards compared to its incorporation back in 1996? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

I am hoping that, again, at least some of us will get elected again. I am hoping that the new Members will see it as a role. I am not 100 percent sure. If I could actually put it in the transition report, I would be more than willing to commit to doing that, but I am not 100 percent sure if I can at this time. What I will say is that I will stress it with our department and ask the department to bring it forward to the next Minister and share my concerns.

Whether elected or not, I have no problem actually writing a letter to the Minister of Education in the next Assembly and sharing my own personal concerns on what we think needs to happen in that Assembly. I will commit on a personal level to sharing my own concerns with that Minister, whoever it may be in the next Assembly. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 797-18(3): Education in the Sahtu Region
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Deh Cho.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

August 13th, 2019

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions are to Premier McLeod. Earlier, I made reference to the community of Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation of Kakisa and their aspirations as a Deh Cho community. What they are contemplating is the question: how can their relationship with the GNWT get better? I think that it is a great opportunity. I am going ask my first question to the Premier: can the Premier update this House on the status of discussions with Ka'a'gee Tu First Nations of Kakisa on their priorities? Mahsi.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Government of the Northwest Territories is happy to work with the Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation to advance their priorities. I certainly agree with the notion that building a better relationship will lead to new possibilities. Each community develops its own infrastructure plan supported by Government of the Northwest Territories funding. MACA provides advice and support on projects and priorities.

We are happy to continue these discussions and look for opportunities to leverage federal funding to achieve the community's priorities. One challenge we all face as leaders is the reality of having more priorities than funding. MACA can support some of the critical analysis required to ensure the local development of their capital plans that will reflect their priorities. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

I would like to thank the Premier for his reply. My second question is: is the GNWT currently planning any future engagements with the Ka'a'gee Tu First Nations?

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Each region has a regional management team, and we also have a regional director; one in the north and one in the south. Our regional management team is committed to continuing engagement with the community. Departments such as MACA and the NWT Housing Corporation have committed to ongoing support and engagement. We want to ensure that our engagement is effective. The regional management committee will work to expand these engagements into other areas of priority as identified by the community.

The fact that we are only a couple of weeks away before the writ is dropped, I don't anticipate that there will be any political visits or engagement with the community. I expect that early in the new 19th Assembly, there will be lots of opportunities for future engagement with the Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Is there a difference in engagement by the GNWT when an Aboriginal government is part of a broader self-government agreement like the Deh Cho process, versus a stand-alone government, such as the K'atlodeeche First Nations?

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I guess it's a fine line that we walk because we try to respect the regional Aboriginal government, such as the Dehcho First Nation. We do not want to be seen as dividing and conquering, so we work with the regional Aboriginal government. In this case, in reference to the K'atlodeeche First Nation, they are no longer part of the Dehcho First Nation. They have signed on to the devolution agreement of 2014, and they are part of our intergovernmental counsel. We have also signed a formal government-to-government arrangement by signing an MoU with the K'atlodeeche First Nation, which we formalize this, regular meetings on an annual basis, and to work out on different priorities and issues. I guess I should also raise the fact that the on-reserve/off-reserve issue also complicates the matter because the K'atlodeeche First Nation is also on reserve, so it does make it very complex, so that is the difference in engagement.

Question 798-18(3): Relationship between Ka'a'gee Tu First Nation/Kakisa and the Government of the Northwest Territories
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.