This is page numbers 1299 - 1316 of the Hansard for the 19th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was land.

Topics

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

The Speaker (Hon. Frederick Blake Jr) Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Minister of Lands.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I thank the Member for the question. I did have the opportunity to meet with a number of the Yellowknife MLAs and talked about it. We have a draft process that we are working on. We shared it with the City of Yellowknife, but we are now finalizing it. We will hope to have it within this session.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

I do believe that is a mandate commitment that is well ahead of schedule, so I congratulate the Minister on that. However, Mr. Speaker, the process guide is really only the first step. It is how and when we will transfer the land that matters, so what I am looking for in order to stop asking this question of the Minister repeatedly is: can I get a firm date when we expect the land transfer to the City of Yellowknife to be completed?

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

The Department of Lands is very much committed to transfer vacant land to the City of Yellowknife or any municipality that wishes it. Unfortunately, I cannot give a firm date because it depends on a number of things, the City of Yellowknife, our Indigenous governments, as we try to work forward. It is about working together. If we need to, we will address small parcels of lands or projects moving forward right now.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

I do believe that, if we cannot get a firm date based on the process guide, then some work needs to be done. Mr. Speaker, I recognize that one of the solutions with land transfer is to break it down into smaller parcels. I am glad to hear the Minister say that. I spoke today in my statement about Deninu Kue First Nation trying to build an RV park on interim land that requires one of the largest land claims in Canada to be settled before they can build an RV park. Mr. Speaker, I believe there is a disconnect between these problems. Is the Minister willing to create a similar process for transferring land to Indigenous governments outside of the formal land claim process?

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Mr. Speaker, the department is able to transfer land to Indigenous governments, much like it does to any applicants for public land. When the Indigenous government is interested in acquiring land, their corporation or the business arm of their organization needs to submit their lease application moving forward.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1310

The Speaker (Hon. Frederick Blake Jr) Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1311

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That answer almost had everything, and then he said, "lease application." What I am looking for is a process guide to transfer land in fee simple. Is the Minister willing to do that? I am sick of leases. I want to transfer and provide some certainty to our Indigenous governments, to our municipalities. Is the Minister willing to create a process document for land in fee simple or Aboriginal title, whatever it may be?

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1311

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

The Member is probably going to not like my answer: no. We are working with the municipalities, and we are working with Indigenous governments. We need to work through a consultation process. I just spent the last two hours with an Indigenous government actually talking about this process. We are working with everybody to try to resolve this. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 367-19(2): Transferring Lands to Municipal Governments
Oral Questions

Page 1311

The Speaker (Hon. Frederick Blake Jr) Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 368-19(2): Contracts to Northwest Territories Businesses at the Giant Mine Remediation Project
Oral Questions

October 19th, 2020

Page 1311

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. In my Member's statement today, I alluded to some differences in definition between the federal government and the GNWT and how they refer to "northern" or "Indigenous" content within their procurement guidelines. I want to kind of get away from that a little bit because assumptions can be concerning when it comes to procurement, and I want to have a very good understanding of how the NWT is benefitting from the Giant Mine Remediation Project. What I am wondering from the Minister of ENR today, Mr. Speaker, is: how many contracts have been awarded to NWT businesses, both as suppliers and contractors, and what dollar value percentage of the entire value of the contracts does this represent?

Question 368-19(2): Contracts to Northwest Territories Businesses at the Giant Mine Remediation Project
Oral Questions

Page 1311

The Speaker (Hon. Frederick Blake Jr) Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.

Question 368-19(2): Contracts to Northwest Territories Businesses at the Giant Mine Remediation Project
Oral Questions

Page 1311

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Before I answer the questions, I want to clarify that, although the GNWT is a co-component of the Giant Mine Remediation Project, the Government of Canada is ultimately the project authority when it comes to procurement. The percentage of contracts the Giant Mine Remediation Project in 2018-2019 awarded was 91 percent; 79 percent of that was northern Indigenous suppliers, and 12 percent went to northern non-Indigenous suppliers. This, the 2019-2020, saw 83 percent of this amount given out; 81 was to northern Indigenous suppliers, and 22 of that was to northern non-Indigenous. In regard to the dollar value, in 2018-2019, there was $26 million out of the $28.8 million that went to northern and non-Indigenous suppliers; 2019-2020 saw $45.85 million out of the total of $49 million.

Question 368-19(2): Contracts to Northwest Territories Businesses at the Giant Mine Remediation Project
Oral Questions

Page 1311

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Before I go on to my next question, I would like to request that those numbers be provided in writing and also the definitions used for each of those, as well, pretty please. Thank you. My second question, Mr. Speaker, is: a significant focus of the Giant Mine Remediation Project needs to be training and apprenticeship; this is an opportunity for the Northwest Territories to develop made-in-the-North experience for remediation workers for a future remediation economy. How many apprentices are currently working on the Giant Mine Remediation Project?

Question 368-19(2): Contracts to Northwest Territories Businesses at the Giant Mine Remediation Project
Oral Questions

Page 1311

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you. In regard to apprentices, I do not know the exact number. Right now, we know that 62 percent of onsite employees report themselves as NWT residents.