This is page numbers 2163 - 2198 of the Hansard for the 19th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was services.

Topics

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions are for the Minister of ECE. When I was lucky enough to be able to still travel through Europe, I used Google Translate a lot to order food and not get myself lost. My question for the Minister: is there an online translation tool such as Google Translate to assist students in oral proficiency of Northwest Territories Indigenous languages? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Not that I am aware of. I know that there are a number of apps that can help students learn or act as dictionaries, but as for an online translator, I am not aware of any. Specifically, Google does not have Indigenous languages in Google Translate. Thank you.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

It seems to me it would be very smart to approach a good, large company like Google who may want to look really good in helping a small jurisdiction want to preserve their language. I am going to follow up with the Minister on that. Google Translate does have 108 languages available on their site. Have we actually approached them at all to add our Indigenous languages to their site?

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

As for the GNWT, I don't believe that we have approached them. Perhaps other Indigenous governments have. I think that's an interesting idea. Just imagine if we could get nine Indigenous languages onto Google translate. That would be something. I look forward to following up with the Member on this one.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Great. I'm a firm believer in not reinventing the wheel, and like I said, it could be a good PR move for Google. The deadline for the MAP applications that I mentioned in my statement was November 20, 2020. Can the Minister speak to the uptake of this program and what the success rate of applications was? How many pairs of mentors and apprentices do we have?

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

I believe this is the third year that the program has run. In the first year, there were 30 pairs. In the second year, there were 40 pairs. For this intake, there were 60 applications, and 40 were accepted. We have 40 pairs in the Mentor-Apprentice Program. It is very popular, and it is growing in popularity every year.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary. Member for Great Slave.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I look forward to learning more about the mentorship program and its success. Lastly, I would like to know if there have been any modifications or issues with administering the program due to COVID-19 restrictions? Thank you.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

As far as I know, it hasn't been affected by COVID-19. It hasn't been put on hold. It is going forward full force, and it doesn't seem to be held up whatsoever. It's a solid program, and I think that the people who are participating in it genuinely enjoy it. The language speakers genuinely enjoy transferring their language. People enjoy learning it. I am hopeful that, for years to come, this is going to be a key part of our revitalization initiatives. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 601-19(2): Northwest Territories Indigenous Languages on Google Translate
Oral Questions

Page 2167

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 602-19(2): Response to Medical Emergencies in Small Communities
Oral Questions

February 26th, 2021

Page 2168

Steve Norn Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Going back to my Member's statement about medical emergencies in small communities. It is a really growing concern. A lot of these times when our government workers have a way of doing the work, there is usually a written procedure or some sort of directive that is given to them to help guide them through their duties. My question for the Minister of Health and Social Services here is: will the Minister be able to share with us when and where a written procedure, or a procedure otherwise, was put in place that prevents community medical staff from responding to emergency calls outside of our local health centres? Marsi cho.

Question 602-19(2): Response to Medical Emergencies in Small Communities
Oral Questions

Page 2168

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 602-19(2): Response to Medical Emergencies in Small Communities
Oral Questions

Page 2168

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am just going to talk a little bit about the role of community health nurses, and then I will give the specific answer the Member asked for. It's important to know that community health nurses are not first responders. First responders have a different skill set. Community health nurses are not permitted, under NTHSSA policy dated November 6, 2019, to leave the healthcare centre in order to provide emergency services. What we do recognize that exists in many NWT communities is a gap in service that relates to ambulances and first responders. That involves going to the injured person and transporting that person from the site of the injury to the health centre. This is something that is in MACA's mandate. I know it's a long-standing problem that I have heard questions asked in the House during this sitting about, and my colleague has said that she is working on it.

I want to give a clarification that community health nurses do leave the health centre when it is their role to provide things like homecare and services to clients in their homes. This is non-emergency service. This would be scheduled service that relates to meeting the needs of people who can't meet them themselves on an ongoing basis, so of course, the community health nurses do leave the health centre to provide that service. The NTHSSA policy is dated November 6, 2019. There were some policies in place that were similar prior to the amalgamation of the health boards, and I am happy to provide the Member with a copy of that policy for him to review. Thank you.

Question 602-19(2): Response to Medical Emergencies in Small Communities
Oral Questions

Page 2168

Steve Norn Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Yes, thank you very much for that. I'd like to take a look at that document. I think it's important that we have open lines communications with our small communities and our service on how we deal with these calls. Like I said, I want to make sure that our residents get as much as we can out of our government departments. That leads to my next question: how do we increase community opportunities for first aid training or for first responder training in the NWT?