This is page numbers 4497 - 4544 of the Hansard for the 19th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was know.

Topics

Members Present

Hon. Diane Archie, Hon. Frederick Blake Jr., Mr. Bonnetrouge, Hon. Paulie Chinna, Ms. Cleveland, Hon. C. Cochrane, Mr. Edjericon (remote), Hon. Julie Green, Mr. Johnson, Ms. Martselos, Ms. Nokleby, Mr. O'Reilly, Ms. Semmler, Hon. R.J. Simpson, Mr. Rocky Simpson, Hon. Shane Thompson, Hon. Caroline Wawzonek, Ms. Weyallon-Armstrong.

The House met at 10:02 a.m.

---Prayer

Prayer
Prayer

Page 4497

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Minister's Statement 258-19(2): Distinctions-Based Funding Announcement
Ministers' Statements

Page 4497

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Mr. Speaker, today I am pleased to acknowledge the efforts of Indigenous governments and the federal government on their approach in addressing housing and infrastructure needs.

I would like to congratulate the Gwich'in Tribal Council, the Tlicho government, and the Deline Got'ine government, on the recent federal funding announcement of $78.6 million for community infrastructure and housing. This funding includes:

  • $11.4 million for the Deline Got'ine government;
  • $25.1 million for the Gwich'in Tribal Council; and
  • $42.1 million for the Tlicho government.

Mr. Speaker, the success of these Indigenous governments in accessing this funding directly from Canada is to be celebrated. It will allow them to chart their own course and address the areas they decide are their top priorities.

Mr. Speaker, this funding does not in any way reduce Housing Northwest Territories' obligation and commitment to providing housing supports in the regions receiving funding. This funding is in addition to Housing Northwest Territories' unprecedented new public housing delivery across the Northwest Territories.

If and when called upon, Mr. Speaker, I want to confirm that Housing NWT looks forward to working collaboratively with these Indigenous governments to realize their housing-related goals, whether this involves sharing blueprints, expertise, or other assistance.

We also stand ready to support Indigenous governments with applications for other available funding that can be accessed for housing priorities, such as the Rapid Housing Initiative and the National Co-Investment Fund.

Mr. Speaker, consistent with Housing NWT's strategic renewal, we support all approaches to increase the total funding for housing to serve citizens of the Northwest Territories. The GNWT will continue to advocate for direct housing funding to all territorial Indigenous governments for funding.

We cannot address the territories' extensive housing needs alone. In collaboration, we need Housing Northwest Territories to stand to work with our partners, whether that be Indigenous governments, the federal government, private industry, or non-governmental organizations to address the housing needs of the territory.

Mr. Speaker, it is my hope and expectation that I will have the opportunity to highlight and celebrate the successes of other Housing Northwest Territories partners here in the Legislative Assembly in the future. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 258-19(2): Distinctions-Based Funding Announcement
Ministers' Statements

Page 4497

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for Health and Social Services.

Minister's Statement 259-19(2): Update on Health System Human Resources
Ministers' Statements

Page 4498

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Good morning, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to update Members on the work being done to recruit and retain health and social services staff in the Northwest Territories. This work responds to the mandate commitment of the 19th Legislative Assembly to increase the number of resident healthcare professionals by at least 20 percent.

The recruitment and retention of health and social services professionals has become increasingly high profile over the past year, as the COVID-19 pandemic has made shortages of health and social services personnel across Canada worse. The department has identified several reasons for the shortages we are experiencing here in the NWT, and they are working hard to address these issues.

Mr. Speaker, the market for nurses and other health professionals has become increasingly competitive across the country. The result is staff shortages and service reductions or closures in many jurisdictions, including our own.

Within the Northwest Territories, these challenges became more serious last summer and led to the temporary closure of the obstetrics unit for three months for the first time in 20 years.

Despite these challenges, I am pleased to report that the most recent vacancy rate data is trending downward for positions that the Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority is actively recruiting. These positions include child and family services positions, licensed practical nurses, and registered nurses. Still, we recognize that the recruitment and retention of health and social services professionals requires a sustained effort.

The health and social services system human resources plan, which will be tabled later today, provides a roadmap for how we will continue and enhance recruitment and retention efforts over the long term. Several of the plan's initiatives are specifically designed to attract Indigenous and northern residents to pursue careers in this field.

Mr. Speaker, our vision is to establish a robust and representative workforce supported by strong leadership and an organizational culture rooted in the principles of cultural safety and anti-racism. I believe achieving this vision will allow our workforce to thrive and, in turn, support continuous improvement in the delivery of health and social services to meet our goal of best health, best care, for a better future for NWT residents.

The plan's overall success will be measured through improved employee engagement and satisfaction, decreased vacancy and turnover rates, and increased representation of Indigenous and northern employees.

To attract more Indigenous people and Northerners into these careers, we have created the Annual NWT Health and Social Services Career Guide, with the 2022 edition launching this month. We are also rolling out the Graduate Transition Program to support new graduates moving into permanent positions within the health and social services system. The clinical observership and job shadowing programs will provide additional tools to encourage youth to explore health and social services careers.

The Family Medicine Residency Program begins its third intake of doctors this July, with our first two residents graduating from the program this month. This vital program is helping to develop, recruit, and retain local family physicians committed to living and working in the Northwest Territories.

To better understand why staff are leaving, we began conducting exit interviews and staff movement surveys over the past year. We also began sending new staff entry surveys three months after their start date to help us understand their experiences and address their concerns early in their career with us.

Using the data and insights gathered from these interviews and surveys, we have been able to prioritize certain action items within human resources that focus specifically on employee engagement and are key to addressing a decline in staff morale and overall staff retention.

This summer, we will launch an updated orientation program, as well as a strategic onboarding framework for all new staff, as well as for those who are new to their position. These programs welcome new employees and help them integrate into their role and environment. They also provide new employees with development opportunities and mentorship.

The launch of a system-wide learning management system to support equal access to mandatory and job specific training is still on track for this summer.

Mr. Speaker, in addition to the launch of the Elsevier Clinical Solutions in November 2021, two new programs have recently launched to support nursing and nursing development.

The Specialized Nursing Transition Program will assist registered nurses who wish to expand their scope of practice into specialized areas. It will start as a pilot program within the obstetrics unit at Stanton, and then expand to all specialty areas within the system.

The Community Health Nursing Competency Program provides training to nurses to develop the competencies required for practice in a community health nurse setting.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, I would once again like to express my gratitude to the staff within the health and social services system for their continued hard-work and dedication to the well-being of residents of the Northwest Territories. The entire health and social services leadership team recognizes and appreciates their tireless efforts during challenging times. We remain committed to providing the tools and supports needed for our workforce to thrive and succeed. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 259-19(2): Update on Health System Human Resources
Ministers' Statements

Page 4499

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for the Status of Women.

Minister's Statement 260-19(2): Update on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Ministers' Statements

Page 4499

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, today is the third-year anniversary of the Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. I wish to honour the Indigenous women and girls and gender-diverse people who have lost their lives or who have experienced or continue to experience trauma and violence.

Mr. Speaker, most people in the Northwest Territories, and certainly everyone in this room, knows someone who has attended a residential or day school, whose grandparent lost a family member during the 50s and 60s tuberculosis outbreak, or whose sibling was taken away during the 60s Scoop. We may also know someone whose friend, sister, or mother, suffered from violence or who was taken away from her family too soon.

Rooted in systemic factors, this violence is often the results of economic, social, and political marginalization, as well as racism and discrimination. The emotional and psychological effects of these events and actions manifest into the present day, with multi-generational and intergenerational trauma continuing to impact Indigenous people in the Northwest Territories and across Canada.

I have said this before, and will continue to say, violence against Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people is a crisis that demands an urgent response. Those words come from the Native Women's Association Northwest Territories' first of four core recommendations to the national inquiry calling on all levels of Canadian leadership to acknowledge this crisis.

Mr. Speaker, despite the increased attention being paid, the crisis is far from over and, therefore, we must continue to meaningfully and sincerely acknowledge.

In December of 2021, I tabled the GNWT's draft action plan in response to the Calls for Justice on the missing and murdered Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people. Entitled "Changing the Relationship," the draft action plan aims to transform the GNWT's approach to service delivery and begin to undo the effects of colonialism and racial and gendered discrimination from all levels of government and public institutions.

The gender equity unit is expected to begin visiting communities in the spring to talk to people about our draft action plan and how we propose to respond to the Calls for Justice. Our territory's gradual emergence from the pandemic stalled our progress in gathering people together, but we are making important progress.

Just this week, the GNWT and the Native Women's Association of the Northwest Territories co-hosted an Indigenous language terminology workshop with interpreters and elders on common terms related to missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls and gender-based violence. The purpose of the workshop was to address potential language barriers that may prevent residents from providing feedback on the draft action plan.

The terminology workshop was an important first step ahead of further community engagement on the action plan. Over the summer, we will visit communities throughout the Northwest Territories to engage with Indigenous governments, community governments, and all Northwest Territories residents about the Calls for Justice and our draft response. The work done at the terminology workshop will be incorporated into the development of Indigenous language materials for community discussions, leading to more meaningful engagement with elders and people with lived experience. Materials will also be available online and distributed in advance of all public engagements.

Earlier this week, I had the honour to share lunch with the participants at the translators' workshop. It was a deeply moving experience. When I walked in, the room was almost literally buzzing. Groups of elders, knowledge-keepers, and language experts representing almost all of the official languages of the Northwest Territories were each gathered at tables. They were not merely asking how to explain a particular word in a different language. They were discussing the root meanings of those words and the cultural understanding or expression underlying it.

When I was there, the group was wrapping up discussion around the translation of 2SLGBTQ and QIA peoples. Representatives from several tables stood to summarize their discussions.

From one table, I heard that historically sexuality, sexual preferences, and gender expression was more fluid and that discrimination against 2SLGBTQQIA peoples was something taught or imposed by colonialism.

I learned that there were traditional words for people whose genders had changed after birth and there was no disrespectfulness associated with this. Rather, it reflected the individual as a person.

From more than one table, I heard sadness and frustration at the cultural loss of the traditional esteem once accorded to two-spirited people. The speakers described that people who were gifted with elements of both genders were revered because having gifts incorporating both genders placed them closer to the Creator.

Mr. Speaker, imagine the impact as communities reclaim this kind of knowledge. Imagine the impact when leadership and governments reflect these kinds of cultural and social understandings. This is a reminder of why our draft action plan must be more than a collection of discrete actions department by department but, rather, a way of thinking and serving that builds on seeing people as they are, where they are, and builds trust.

Mr. Speaker, the release of the final report of the national inquiry was momentous and brought to the forefront the need for change in all levels of leadership, all governments and across society. Social change takes time, but we have an opportunity to take an active role in a process of change to improve the safety and well-being of Northwest Territories Indigenous women, girls, and gender-diverse people. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 260-19(2): Update on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
Ministers' Statements

Page 4500

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for Education, Culture and Employment.

Minister's Statement 261-19(2): Acknowledging Education Hall of Fame Inductees and 2022 Grade 12 Graduates
Ministers' Statements

Page 4500

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Mr. Speaker, as another school year comes to a close for students across the Northwest Territories, I would like to recognize this year's graduates. Whether they are graduating from kindergarten, high school, or a post-secondary institution like Aurora College, the territory's graduates have a lot to be proud of.

---Applause

The pandemic has created unprecedented disruptions in every sector of society. The last two years have posed great challenges for residents, with the impacts of COVID-19 taking an emotional, mental and physical toll on the health and well-being of NWT residents, communities, businesses and industries, and these impacts extend to NWT's students and educators.

Mr. Speaker, during the pandemic many educational institutions in the NWT closed their doors for in-person learning with lessons moving online and in-person exchanges replaced with virtual interactions. Teachers had to change the way they taught and students had to change the way they learned. It was a challenging time, Mr. Speaker, and this year's graduates persevered and have shown resiliency and dedication, skills that will help them achieve even more success in the future.

Despite the excitement of graduation, it is important to acknowledge that the impacts of COVID-19 on students and educators are still very real and may be felt for months and years to come. The Department of Education, Culture and Employment has been compiling information on school closures and remote learning to inform future decision-making. We are currently using existing wellness data, referrals for school-based mental health and wellness services, and academic progress reports provided by education bodies to monitor the needs of NWT students and guide future decisions and supports.

While there is not a single solution to the challenges that result from school closures and remote learning, ECE provides support services that can help, including mental wellness counselling through the child and youth care counselling initiative and career and education advising to help our students prepare to take their next life step. In addition, the annual territorial teachers conference this fall will focus on how to best support learning and instruction post-pandemic.

Mr. Speaker, as part of the NWT's graduation ceremonies, in the coming weeks eight deserving individuals will be inducted into the NWT Education Hall of Fame for 2021 and 2022. Reading the nomination letters was a wonderful reminder of the important role that educators play in students' lives and careers. Not only do they equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to pursue their education and career goals, but they also help students build the confidence to dream big and set high expectations for themselves.

Mr. Speaker, pursuing any level of education is never easy, but we do it because it is important. It is important to each of us as individuals, and it is important to all of us as a community. The knowledge and skills we gain through education benefit everyone, and create a stronger and more resilient territory.

Mr. Speaker, congratulations to the graduating class of 2022. Thank you.

Minister's Statement 261-19(2): Acknowledging Education Hall of Fame Inductees and 2022 Grade 12 Graduates
Ministers' Statements

Page 4501

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Members' statements. Member for Hay River South.

Member's Statement 1140-19(2): Congratulations to Graduates
Members' Statements

Page 4501

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just wanted to let you know I wrote that statement for the Minister.

No, just kidding.

Mr. Speaker, as this school year ends, I would like to recognize and congratulate all those students from Hay River, Enterprise, West Point First Nation, and K'atlodeeche First Nation, who are graduating from Ecole Boreale, Diamond Jenness Secondary School, Chief Sunrise Education Centre, and Aurora College. I know that each of the graduates will not forget the year they graduated. This year it will not because of COVID but it will be remembered as the year of extensive flooding.

Mr. Speaker, we can all appreciate and acknowledge the commitment, sacrifice, and the years of hard work these students put in to achieve their status as graduates. These students started their educational journey as young children and have now finished as young adults. That chapter has now closed and it is time to take that next step, whether it is to further their education, join the workforce, or travel the world. It is only the beginning of their new journey.

Mr. Speaker, the only advice I would offer each student is show respect to others, show compassion to others, and always be open to new ideas. And most importantly, follow your dreams and passion as it will be each of you who will shape the future.

Mr. Speaker, for the graduates to achieve the success each celebrates, we must recognize the parents, caregivers, family, and those teachers who, throughout the years, supported and encouraged each of you to succeed. In the future, I hope that each graduate will look back and understand the importance of this achievement and, in turn, convey the importance of education while sharing their experience with others as they move forward in life.

Mr. Speaker, in closing, I congratulate the graduates of 2022 and wish them all a bright, successful, and healthy future. Thank you Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1140-19(2): Congratulations to Graduates
Members' Statements

Page 4501

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Here, here. Members' statements. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Member's Statement 1141-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance
Members' Statements

Page 4501

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in June of 2020, I raised the impact of flooding that caused many of my constituents and at that time, I was advised that the hunters and trapper disaster compensation could help. This program, harvesters must earn at least 25 percent of their gross income from renewable resource harvesting to be eligible, and they could be eligible up to a maximum of $4,500 per occurrence for damage or loss by natural disaster other than forest fires according to the guidelines by ENR at this time.

Mr. Speaker, on February 12th, 2021, there was a news article quoting that the department has increased its harvester disaster compensation and in this article, the article stated that the residents that were impacted by the Taltson River flood could be eligible for up to $40,000 in financial relief.

On March 4th, 2021, the Minister committed to a commitment to review the hunters and trappers disasters compensation as well. Mr. Speaker, this year, the water in Inuvik area is higher than any previous year. So those ones that were not affected two years ago by the flood were pretty much all were affected this year. And now we're in the process of assessing the damage.

I would like my residents the same opportunity that was given to the residents impacted by the Taltson River flooding to ensure that ENR regional office in Inuvik has clear direction from the deputy minister's office and the Minister's office that they will be given the same consideration.

Mr. Speaker, with the cost of building supplies and the increased fuel costs, as well as inflation, $4,500 is not going to go a long way.

I will have questions for the Minister of ENR. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1141-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance
Members' Statements

Page 4502

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Member's Statement 1142-19(2): Financial Transparency for Infrastructure Spending
Members' Statements

Page 4502

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to rise today and speak about transparency in infrastructure budgeting.

Last fall in this House, we passed a confidential amount for the Whati Power Project. We're not allowed to say how much we passed. We also know the total amount of that project but it's confidential information. And when you ask the government why we can't talk about how much a specific project says, they say oh, it'll affect tendering. Yet, Mr. Speaker, I just don't believe that is remotely true.

A comparable project, the Fort Providence Transmission Line, we know costs $60 million. In fact, we knew that one year before any money ever came to this Assembly because the federal government announced it. And every time the federal government gives us money, they announce the total cost they are providing to the GNWT and the total project cost, and it takes about a year, actually, before that money ever even gets approved by the Assembly. So it's announced as if it's a done fact, and we're just going to rubber stamp whatever amount is.

Additionally, Mr. Speaker, at a municipal level, it would be impossible to ever approve a project without talking about the total project cost. The vast majority of infrastructure is actually municipal, and often whenever a council is approving a project, not only is the total project cost there, but actually the design and a cost estimate.

Mr. Speaker, I have never seen a public GNWT cost estimate. Every once in a while, we're lucky if we get a business case. I know we are all eagerly awaiting the Taltson business case, but I strongly doubt we will ever see a Fort Providence Transmission Line business case or a Whati business case.

And Mr. Speaker, yesterday in this House, the government let $125 million in infrastructure spending lapse. And they didn't think it was important to tell the public which projects they are letting lapse. Perhaps there is a very important infrastructure project in your community that you were previously told was going ahead has now disappeared off the books, and there is no public record of what those projects are, Mr. Speaker.

$125 million, of money that this House previously approved, has now just been removed without telling the public what actually happened.

Mr. Speaker, I will have questions for the Minister of Infrastructure about how we can get some more transparency in our budgeting.

This is a uniquely GNWT project. You can go to almost any other jurisdiction in Canada and look at their long-term capital projects. You can look at their long-term needs assessment. You can see the cost estimates for individual projects. You can see what years that money will be dispersed, and then you can track through time whether it's on time and on budget. We have asked repeatedly for staff to try and find out if projects are on time and on budget, and with publicly-available information, Mr. Speaker, it is an impossible task. And given we are letting about half of our capital budget get carried over or lapsed, it's very clear that consistently the GNWT's projects are not on time and not on budget.

I'll have questions for the Minister of Infrastructure. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1142-19(2): Financial Transparency for Infrastructure Spending
Members' Statements

Page 4502

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Members' statements. Member for Thebacha.

Member's Statement 1143-19(2): Warm Wishes for Summer 2022
Members' Statements

Page 4502

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, for my statement today, I want to wish all the Indigenous leaders across the NWT a wonderful summer. I know it is difficult for anyone to put their names forward for elected office. So as a former chief, I want to wish all my former colleagues well and I hope they, and their constituents, all have great assemblies this year in person.

In addition, Mr. Speaker, I would like to wish all my colleagues here, including you, Mr. Speaker, a good and restful summer break. I also liked to wish all the staff of the Assembly for keeping us on track and making sure we follow protocols and their continued support for our work as leaders, including my own staff member, my CA, a good and happy summer as well.

Lastly, Mr. Speaker, I want to wish all the amazing constituents of Thebacha a great summer season.

I would also like to extend this message to all the leadership of Fort Smith, which includes the Salt River First Nation, the Fort Smith Metis Council, and the Town of Fort Smith. Thank you to all the leadership and to my constituents for your continued support in me as MLA for Thebacha.

Thank you as well to my community team for always being there for me and for the people that I serve in our community. You know who you are. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1143-19(2): Warm Wishes for Summer 2022
Members' Statements

Page 4503

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Thebacha. Members' statements. Member for Great Slave.

Member's Statement 1144-19(2): 2022 Skills Canada National Competition
Members' Statements

Page 4503

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also wish you a very good summer.

After a two-year hiatus due to the pandemic, Skills Canada is back. Last week, the medal results of the 2022 Skills Canada national competition, held in Vancouver were announced. From May 27th to the 28th, 350 students and apprentices from across Canada competed for the title of national champion in 45 skill areas, both in person at the Vancouver Convention Centre, and virtually from their home territories and provinces. Team Northwest Territories is proud to announce they have taken home five medals in skilled trade areas.

Over 3,000 student visitors, industry leaders, government officials, and industry celebrities participated in this national event. HGTV's Kate Campbell; the Honourable Anne Kang, Minister of Advanced Education and Skills Training,
and the Honourable Andrew Mercier, parliamentary secretary for skills training, all took part in the event.

Skills Canada NWT's team consisted of seven competitors in a variety of skilled trade competitions, working hard over the two-day competition. These competitors set a record for percentage of a team medaling on the national stage when they brought five medals home to the territory. As well, two of the secondary school competitors did a fantastic job considering it was their first time virtually participating in a skilled trade competition.

Team NWT's competitors included:

  • From St Pat's, Kaitlyn Stewart, who competed in fashion technology; and,
  • Jaida Dowe, who competed in hairstyling and won a bronze medal.

In the post-secondary and apprentice categories:

  • Adam Nitsiza of J&R Mechanical won a bronze medal in plumbing;
  • Deanna Buckley of Gahcho Kue Diamond Mine/DeBeers Canada competed in the industrial mechanic/millwright category, also taking home a bronze medal;
  • Connor Fleming of GAP Electric competed in electrical installations; and,
  • Teammate Austin Brown of Aurora Ford/Ekati Diamond Mine won a silver in automotive technology; finally,
  • Emma Taylor of Mint Hair Salon, who is currently attending school at Madam Chair College brought gold home to the territories.

Skills Canada Northwest Territories' mission is to engage Northwest Territories youth to explore career opportunities in skilled trades and technologies. Engagement through workshops, presentations, and competitions gives secondary, post-secondary students, and apprentices a chance to learn more about these lucrative and viable career options in the Northwest Territories. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement. Thank you.

---Unanimous consent granted

Thank you. The good news is I won't do this again this session.

Contributors to the event include the Government of Canada, ECE, the Royal Bank of Canada, Rio Tinto Diavik Diamond Mine, and WSCC.

I want to send an extra special thank you to the school districts, educators, and volunteers throughout the Northwest Territories that support this fabulous organization. I personally had the opportunity to participate several times in their Power Up Youth Mentorship Workshops hosting a water treatment filter building workshop with 13-year-olds. It was always the highlight of my year as a consultant, and I'm excited for the organization to get back to all the important work they do.

Additionally, like my colleagues, I would like to congratulate all the graduates in the NWT, and specifically those in my riding. The fact that you have persevered over the last few years is a testament to your resilience and strength. Congratulations. Thank you.

Member's Statement 1144-19(2): 2022 Skills Canada National Competition
Members' Statements

Page 4504

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Members' statements. Member for Frame Lake.

Member's Statement 1145-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Members' Statements

Page 4504

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. In July 2021, the Minister of Finance was undertaking public budget consultations. I want to compliment the Minister for this important initiative, which has happened in each of the last three years. Despite urging from Regular MLAs, the last Minister did not do this.

For the 2021 budget consultation or dialogue, the Minister of Finance posted a revenue options discussion paper just the day before public engagements. I would certainly encourage that the discussion paper be refreshed, with a more balanced approach to taxation, and be released well in advance of any meetings.

I am quite concerned about what it will cost us to ensure our residents in Hay River can recover quickly and fairly from the devastating flood in May, the need to rebuild GNWT infrastructure there, and any further preventative measures such as relocations or diking. With inflation running at 6.8 percent nationally and 7.1 percent here in Yellowknife compared to April 2021, we must find more revenues to maintain the same programs and services.

In the past I've suggested a number of ways to raise more revenues including:

  • Adding at least one more high-income tax bracket to personal income tax;
  • A capital tax on financial institutions as we are one of only five jurisdictions in Canada without such a tax;
  • Raising more revenues from mining royalties which are comparatively low against most other regimes; and
  • Negotiating a new fiscal relationship with Ottawa where we get to keep more, if not all, of our own source revenues.

The current fiscal path is completely unsustainable. Now is the time to examine our core values of sharing, justice, equity, and whether these are truly reflected in our revenue efforts as we recover and rebuild.

Another way to spend more on our programs is to reduce our capital spending. As shown in the supplementary appropriation we just dealt with, we could not spend the money in the last capital budget. We need to become more realistic and focused on those projects that provide real benefits to our people, especially housing.

I will have questions later today for the Minister of Finance on preparations for Budget 2023-2024 later today. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1145-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Members' Statements

Page 4504

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Members' statements. Member for Deh Cho.

Member's Statement 1146-19(2): National Indigenous History Month
Members' Statements

Page 4504

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker, and TGIF to everyone.

Mr. Speaker, in June of every year, we celebrate National Indigenous History Month. During this month, we celebrate the rich history, heritage, resilience, and diversity of First Nations, Inuit, and Metis peoples across Canada.

There's a writer who shared that since time in memorial, our oral traditions have been passed from generation to generation, teach our beliefs, history, values, practices, customs, rituals, and relationships. Mr. Speaker, this goes across all nations.

Our elders, also known as knowledge-keepers, pass on our culture and teachings so we will not forget our roots to Mother Earth and to preserve our way of life.

The drum is a gift which enlights us all and it is through this unity that we form a circle of life allowing us to share the drumbeat of a nation in dance. Go out and enjoy life with Indigenous people, and feel the connection. Taste the traditional foods of our people. Feel the spiritual connection with the feeding of the fire, and let your troubles soar away.

Mr. Speaker, June 21st is recognized as National Indigenous Peoples Day across this country and here in the North. We celebrate this day in many of our communities so come on out and get your drum dance on. Mahsi.

Member's Statement 1146-19(2): National Indigenous History Month
Members' Statements

Page 4505

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you Member for Deh Cho. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Member's Statement 1147-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Members' Statements

Page 4505

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, spring is a beautiful and powerful time of transition, both in season and in the lives of many Northerners. Our pride of northern graduates and the anticipation of summer adventures are putting bounce in our step so this feels like an opportune time to work with housing to make some of our own transitions.

Mr. Speaker, earlier this week the Minister identified the delay of the 2018 commitment of a homelessness strategy was a needed all-of-government approach and to avoid any unintended consequences. I agree with the need of government integration, shared accountability, and mechanisms for a person-centered approach. In addition, I agree that good policy means considering, weighing, and evaluating unintended consequences.

The Minister also said the delay was due to a desire to bring forward an approach that can be resourced but later said "once the document is implemented, we need to find resources."

Mr. Speaker, as a Regular Member, at this point I have no idea what this strategy will include or the action it will compel from the government but I know that after four years of drafting and redrafting, my expectations are big. One of my biggest frustrations, Mr. Speaker, is that in the four years of drafting this strategy, the government has not made efforts to evolve policies with unintended consequences of homelessness.

The Housing NWT Community Residency Policy as unintended consequences that do cause homelessness. It requires an NWT resident to live in a community for a predetermined number of months before they can then add their name to the public housing waitlist.

Mr. Speaker, if implementing the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the MMIWG Calls for Justice, and the TRC Calls to Action are a priority of this government, they need to flip policies and ask if the unintended consequences are justifiable. And they need to do that now, not sitting with them for four years. If the government spends its entirety reviewing, reflecting, and strategizing without the action, nothing will change.

Mr. Speaker, I had the opportunity to listen to NWT residents during the anti-poverty round table focused on housing and homelessness. One resounding theme was a call to action to stop researching and planning and to start listening, acting, and then evaluating, because then we have at least tried to change.

This policy keeps people from jobs, family, and autonomy. But even more jarring, Mr. Speaker, it prevents Northerners from accessing resources, prevents parents from leaving violent relationships, and jeopardizes a parent's ability to keep their children out of the child welfare system.

This policy, Mr. Speaker, causes homelessness. Housing NWT needs to stop upholding a policy that limits a person's self-determination in health, economic, and social sufficiency through housing. Thank you.

Member's Statement 1147-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Members' Statements

Page 4505

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Members' statements. Minister of Monfwi.

Member's Statement 1148-19(2): Congratulations and Well-Wishes to Constituents
Members' Statements

Page 4505

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My statement is on a summer message to my constituents and others.

Mr. Speaker, I want to say thank you to all the pages here, especially to Nate Simpson, Alexis Kotchilea-Judas, from Alexis Arrowmaker School, for a job well done and to have a good, safe summer.

Mr. Speaker, I want to wish all the students in the Tlicho regions and in NWT for completing this school year. Also a big congratulations to Grad 2022 from Chief Jimmy Bruneau school in Behchoko, Jean Wetrade in Gameti, Alexis Arrowmaker School in Wekweeti, and Mezi Community School in Whati for reaching this important accomplishment in their lives. I know it was challenging at times due to COVID. I wish them all to have a good, safe summer.

Additionally, Mr. Speaker, I would like to extend my congratulations to all Tlicho citizens who are college and university graduates for the Class of 2022. It is important to recognize the success of all Tlicho citizens, no matter how big or small they may seem.

I would also like to extend my thanks to all the family, friend, educators, and staff who help support all graduating students get to this milestone moment.

Mr. Speaker, I want to wish all the Tlicho citizens, all our elders, they are the true knowledge-keepers, they are our teachers and professors; I want to wish them all to have a happy, safe summer.

I would also like to wish all my colleagues here in this House and all the staff, the interpreters of the Legislative Assembly, to have a good summer break as well. May God bless you, keep you and your family safe on your journey. I look forward to continue my travel to all the Tlicho communities over the summer and attend the Tlicho Annual June Assembly as well. Thank you, Mr. Speaker; you, as well too, have a good, safe summer.

Member's Statement 1148-19(2): Congratulations and Well-Wishes to Constituents
Members' Statements

Page 4506

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Mahsi cho, Member for Monfwi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Member's Statement 1149-19(2): Reflections on Consensus Government
Members' Statements

Page 4506

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. When I first came to serve here, I was proud to continue the tradition begun by the honourable men and women that came before me. I was just as proud of the consensus government that has set us apart from the rest of Canada. This institution has incredible strengths for its foundation, our people, and aspirations. Yet somehow we have forgotten this strength and instead have turned our Assembly against itself.

We find excuses instead of action. We carry out infighting instead of cooperation. We choose to establish core order ambition for the future.

Mr. Speaker, I have remained steadfast in my belief that our consensus system is the best way to govern our people, lands, and resources. However, when our government's resolve was tested by a once-in-a-lifetime pandemic, sadly our consensus government has demonstrated its inability to move past its flaws and build a future that will lead to growth and opportunity and wellness.

If our system is truly rooted in Indigenous traditions, then why do Indigenous people bear a disproportionate burden of social ills and economic depression compared to the rest of the territory? How can this be our system was designed to elevate Indigenous people who have been the stewards of the NWT since time in immemorial. How can we claim that this is partnership within these walls and truth are deeply-divided.

Between Indigenous and non-Indigenous, Yellowknife and small communities, Cabinet and Regular Members, instead of stepping up and coming together to solve problems, we keep our heads down, our mouths closed, and think I'm just here for my riding, I don't need to worry about anything else.

Mr. Speaker, it has been only three months since I've been elected to this House. I was sad to learn that there's no (audio). Our government seems ready to pass on along our most pressing issues as our territory to the next Assembly. We only need to look at the most recent report of the Auditor General of Canada into addictions to see the costs of continued inaction and passing the buck. Despite continued advocacy for better mental health, our leaders then and now insist there's nothing more that we can do.

The latest report provides otherwise a report that joins along this stuff escaping audits. This serves as a solemn reminder that despite repeated inquiries to long-standing problems, consensus politics hasn't been able to muster the collective political will to solve them.

Mr. Speaker, I ran for office for my constituents to help and be part of this institution that's greater than some of its Members. Something must be done to change how we work in this government because what we have isn't working well. We risk leaving our people a little more than frustration and despair if we do not act. I, for one, keep the promise I made to my constituents and find the best path forward for my people even if it means leaving old traditional ways. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1149-19(2): Reflections on Consensus Government
Members' Statements

Page 4506

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Member's Statement 1150-19(2): Cyber-Bullying
Members' Statements

Page 4507

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Social networking or social media are a great way to keep in touch with friends, family, or just a way to keep up with the social life of everyone around you. Unfortunately, as we all know there are consequences to our online networking such as cyber-bullying.

Mr. Speaker, cyber-bullying is bullying with the use of digital technology. It can take place on social media, game platforms, gaming platform, and mobile phones. It is repeated behaviour aimed at scaring, angering, or shaming those who are targeted. Examples include:

  • Speaking half-truths or opinions that may or may not support the evidence out there;
  • Sending harmful, abusive, or threatening messages via various messaging platforms;
  • Impersonating someone and sending mean messages to others on their behalf or fake accounts;
  • Saying and implying comments about the person without using the person's name.

Face-to-face bullying and cyber-bullying can often happen alongside each other but cyber-bullying leaves a digital footprint that can be seen for a long time or can be reproduced.

Mr. Speaker, cyber-bullying is one of the worst things that we live with today, not only for teens but for society in general. It is a very stressful and dangerous way to deal with issues and can have some very bad consequences including, mainly, such things as depression, even suicidal thoughts.

Mr. Speaker, as we all have experienced, there are individuals out there using Hansard as a platform to get their opinions across and saying things without consequences. As a politician, we get individuals out there that don't agree with your decision or of this government. I once asked an individual why they took to social media to express their frustrations and their response was it is a way to say things that are on my mind without no one arguing with us. I tried to explain that this was not the best approach to go about. The response I received is you should be doing the same thing. You should be out there disagreeing with and arguing with the people on that platform. At this point in time, we agreed to disagree and move on to another topic.

Mr. Speaker as Bono says, be kind to one another. I hope and pray people actually follow through on this. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1150-19(2): Cyber-Bullying
Members' Statements

Page 4507

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nahendeh. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife South.

Member's Statement 1151-19(2): Recognizing 2022 Youth Parliament Participant Aubrey Sluggett
Members' Statements

Page 4507

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today is the one year anniversary of the release of the national action plan to address the crisis of missing and murdered women, girls, and 2SLGBTQ and QIA+ peoples.

I chose this day to acknowledge the work of Yellowknife South Youth Parliament participant Aubrey Sluggett. Aubrey stood in this Chamber on May the 12th and gave a Minister's statement. As the representative of Yellowknife South, she was able to pick any topic she felt was important to her and the youth of the North and within the portfolios of Finance, Industry, Tourism and Investment, or Status of Women.

Mr. Speaker, Aubrey used her words and her platform here to bring attention to the national inquiry movement in the Northwest Territories, the public benches that the Yellowknife Women's Society has placed in honour of missing women, and the monument that we built on the Legislative Assembly grounds. She also spoke to what she felt we could be doing further to enhance the work that we are already moving forward on.

Mr. Speaker, further to this, she spoke of the importance of women in political office and how happy she was to point out that our legislature is a majority female and that the Youth Parliament had 14 female parliamentarians and one nonbinary parliamentarian.

Mr. Speaker, I was very proud to be a resident of Yellowknife South on May 12th represented by Aubrey Sluggett. It is not only the future that is in good hands, it is our present leadership who are pushed to live up to the example and the expectations of those who will ultimately inherit these roles. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Member's Statement 1151-19(2): Recognizing 2022 Youth Parliament Participant Aubrey Sluggett
Members' Statements

Page 4507

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife South. Members' statements. Returns to oral questions. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Acknowledgements. Oral questions. Member for Hay River South.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this past week, I received many emails from teachers, parents, and students complaining about a long-standing issue with the plumbing at the Ecole Boreale portable in Hay River.

Mr. Speaker, can the Minister of ECE confirm if his department has looked into the issue and determined what the cause of the problem is? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Minister responsible for Education, Culture and Employment.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also received dozens and dozens of emails from students, staff, parents, perhaps other people in the community who were concerned about this issue, and I appreciate those emails because it brought it to my attention.

The Department of Education, Culture and Employment became aware of this issue just prior to the flooding in Hay River, and that was really the first time that we knew about it.

So the issue that we've learned, in consultation with the Department of Infrastructure, is that there have been ongoing sewage backup issues. This goes back to -- the original issue goes back to when the portable was installed. The sewer line was hooked up to an abandoned sewer line. The sewer line from the building was hooked up to an abandoned sewer line instead of the newer sewer line which it should have been hooked up to. There has been a temporary fix in place for many years and from what I understand, it had been working but over the last -- over this year in particular, and perhaps over the last few years as well, there have been increasing issues. Thank you

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this issue has been a long-standing one, as the Minister said.

Can the Minister confirm how and when this plumbing issue will be addressed to the satisfaction of the Ecole Boreale staff, students, and parents, as those students, staff, and parents accessing the building have a right to a safe place to learn and work. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I agree, students need a place to learn that is supportive of that learning. And in a supportive learning environment, staff need a safe supportive workplace as well. And so as soon as we learned about this, we started working with the Department of Infrastructure, and there will be a permanent fix in place over the summer. So in the next school year, it will no longer be an issue. It would be great if we could fix this issue before the summer, fix it now, but it's a very disruptive process. I believe it involves digging up the parking lot and, you know, the smell of sewer would be far beyond what it is now. So we have to wait until the summer to get it done but it is getting done. Thank you.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, can the Minister confirm if there are issues other than the plumbing, such as heat and cooling, as those were mentioned as recurring issues that need to be addressed as well.

Will the Minister also commitment his department to following up on these issues and remedy any issues found before the start of next school year? Thank you.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And there have been concerns about the classrooms being too hot in the late spring/early summer. As a result, Infrastructure has installed portable air conditioners. There isn't a plan to connect the portable building to the main air handling unit but we do have the portable air conditioners in place. And I will say that, you know, this issue brought to light the fact there needs to be a little better communication. So I've reached out -- or I've had conversations with the president of the CSFTNO, the French language school board, and I've had conversations with the Minister of Infrastructure, and we are going to ensure that if there is an issue that the school board is encouraged to bring it forward. I want to hear from the president when there's these issues, and I told the department they need to have that discussion at the officials level as well because we don't want these to become long-standing issues; we want to get them fixed as soon as possible. I'm here to advocate for those education bodies and advocate for the students, and I need to know what's going on in order to do that. Thank you.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4508

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Hay River South.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4509

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, when this portable was first put in place, I think it was supposed to be a three-year fix. It's probably been ten years since it was actually, you know, installed. So, Mr. Speaker, when the portable was constructed, like I said it was a short-term solution to address lack of space in the main building, is it the department's intent to look at an expansion of the main building to eliminate the requirement for the portable? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4509

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. So currently there is nothing on the books to build a new permanent facility at Ecole Boreale. As the MLA, I advocated for, you know, that in the past, advocated for a gym, advocating for all of these issues as the Member is doing now. Unfortunately, there was a decision made, you know, 15 years ago that we are now dealing with. It would have been great if they had just built a permanent building at that point. But now we're at the point where we have many schools that are in need of repair. There's 49 schools in the territory, you know, over 50 years old some of them, in desperate need of repair, and so it's a very competitive environment. So there is nothing on the books. But I hear about those issues. I hear about the desire for a gym at Ecole Boreale. And I would love to give them one. I'd love to give a gym to Jean Marie River as well, to N'dilo, to Dettah - to a number of different schools - but the fact is it's tough to get together the money to serve all the needs in the territory. But I am going to work with the Minister of Infrastructure and with my department to determine what the needs are at Ecole Boreale and see what we can do in the future. Thank you.

Oral Question 1143-19(2): Infrastructure Issues at Ecole Boreale
Oral Questions

Page 4509

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4509

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In my statement I talked about transparency in infrastructure budgeting, and I want to use the Whati Transmission Line as an example.

The Whati Transmission Line has been debated for years in this House. It's clear that millions of dollars have been approved because it appears in the main estimates debates year after year. It's clear that millions of dollars have been spent because there's talk of geotechnical and reporting and a feasibility assessments being done. Some Members have oft-repeated that it would be cheaper to introduce three hydro projects as opposed to one transmission line, which is a statement you can't evaluate because there's no public figure telling you how much the transmission line actually costs.

So my question is, after years of talking publicly about this line and the different costs and weighing the benefits, can we finally have an estimated cost of the Whati Transmission Line? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4509

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Minister responsible for Infrastructure.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4509

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Whati Transmission Line is a key initiative, and I'm going to keep saying this, under our 2030 Energy Strategy. This proposed project will occur 100 percent on Tlicho lands, and the GNWT and the Tlicho governments are committed to advancing this important project together.

The Department of Infrastructure and the Tlicho government recently began working together to be able to determine an acceptable routing corridor for the transmission line between the Snare Forks hydroelectricity facility and Whati. The tentative date for the completion of this part of the work is in fall of 2022. Once this routing corridor for the project is known, infrastructure and Tlicho will collaborate on preliminary engineering and design. This work will include internal preliminary capital costs estimates that reflects the design work and the routing corridor. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4509

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. You know, a "no" would have sufficed. I actually don't have any idea how much this project costs, and what we're talking about.

Can the Minister tell me how much money we've spent to date on this project and how much money this Assembly has approved? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4509

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I will go back to the department and see how much of that was spent. We're so early in the stages of this project, we're still working with Tlicho. We haven't decided on a route. There's so many different factors that are involved. Without us knowing that, we don't know how much it's going to cost. Thank you.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Yes, thank you, Mr. Speaker. I get that, you know, there's different classes of cost estimates and they have different specificity. You know, we know that the Fort Providence Transmission Line costs $60 million. The GNWT doesn't have that publicly anywhere but the federal government told us that when they gave us the money. So I'm just assuming we're in about the $60 million range of public money here. That's the assumption I operate on. But I would like to understand the reason when we pass money in this House for infrastructure projects we are not told the total cost publicly is that it would affect the tendering. And in this case, I want to know for a transmission line that is going to cost 10s of millions of dollars, and I think might even be a P3, whether there is in any actual real concern that the public figure of the total cost will affect tendering of this? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, releasing internal construction costs estimates publicly before procurement has a strong potential to influence that process and could result in higher costs to the government. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Yellowknife North.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I want to point out that every single municipal project ever has the total public amount released before tendering because it's approved by council. I want to note that every time the federal government announces money, we have the total amount because they announced it. Did we get mad at the federal government when they told us how much the Fort Providence Transmission Line was going to cost, which has not yet been tendered?

Mr. Speaker, additionally, we don't give public estimates and we don't give business cases. I don't know if there's actually a business case for this transmission line. And so my question is, is there a business case and is that something that could be shared publicly before we spend or approve millions more of public money? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Whati project is not being developed using a traditional business case. This project is part of an initiative under our 2030 Energy Strategy, to use federal dollars earmarked to displace diesel in our remote communities.

Fortunately, typical maintenance costs for a 60-kilometre transmission line are significantly less than the annual diesel fuel savings. That will result from converting the community of Whati from diesel to hydro power for the next 50 years.

As I mentioned, Mr. Speaker, in my response to the first question, this is an important investment that will reduce GHG emissions in the community and help stabilize the costs of energy going forward to the community of Whati. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1144-19(2): Cost of the Whati Transmission Line
Oral Questions

Page 4510

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister of the Department of ENR.

Has the Minister's department completed the Hunters and Trappers Disasters Compensation Policy and when can we expect this policy publicly? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4510

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Minister responsible for Environment and Natural Resources.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Before I answer that, I'd like to thank both the MLAs from Yellowknife and the Speaker for keeping constant contact to me as we watched the river break up there. I mean, it was devastating. And my condolences to the residents that have been impacted.

Mr. Speaker, ENR is currently conducting review of the current Hunters and Trappers Disasters Compensation Policy, including program criteria, eligibility, and scope of operational guidelines. This review will build on past experiences, including recent flooding events in a number of communities across the Northwest Territories. The review is currently underway and will be shared publicly once updated. And I can guarantee the Regular Members will be getting that information as soon as it's ready to go. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4510

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And the Minister alluded a little bit of the changes but are you able to share what some of these significant changes that may be when this policy comes into effect? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the current review of the Hunters and Trappers Disaster Compensation Policy is being assessed all aspects of the program including eligibility, amount of compensation that will be available for harvesters. Any changes are intended to help people engage in traditional economy, support access to country food, and support people being on the land. ENR will engage with key partners before final changes are done. So the policy is open and we're trying to improve it globally. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is for the Minister about past experiences.

So I mentioned in my statement that the Taltson River, when it flooded, a lot of the hunter and trapper cabins, there was increase in compensation during that flood to those hunters and trappers. So will my constituents now, and any other hunters and trappers impacted by floods, be eligible to the same compensation that was given to those in the Taltson River as it was referred to in some news articles, up to $40,000? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, and I thank the Member for this very important question. The Taltson River flooding event resulted in significant damages to cabins out there, and we viewed applications individually to look at how best to support the applicants. So there is an exception to it, in that process there. We will again review application on case-by-case basis and suggest that affected hunters and trappers reach out to their local ENR office. Again, just so the impacted people out there, please reach out to our regional offices. We're willing to work with you and, again, there will be exceptions that we need to look at. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And thank you for that, Minister. As many people supplement their income by offsetting food costs now with harvesting fish, ducks, geese, moose, berries -- not everyone does this -- by selling furs or calculating how they're harvesting. So I think I heard in his statement in the review that some of this stuff would be added into the review. And they do this from their cabins out on the delta. So how does ENR or how will ENR, or is this going to be in the review, how they are measuring earning 25 percent and will they do -- will they ensure that there's a way to include this, measure this kind of offset? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And Mr. Speaker, I thank the Member for a great question.

ENR relies on hunters and trappers to provide evidence that 25 percent of their income comes from harvesting. At this point, no decision has been made on possible changes to eligible criteria under the new program but this aspect is under review. So we are working with impacted residents, hunters and trappers, as well as Indigenous governments to work on this, and committee. Hunters and trappers, again, can reach out to our local ENR office to get assistance to complete their applications. So we're there to help. And more than willing to work with the individuals but also the Members that have affected constituents. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1145-19(2): Hunters and Trappers Disaster Assistance Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions.

Colleagues, before we continue, I'd like to welcome back our former Premier, Mr. Bob McLeod, and his wife Melody and the rest of his family. Welcome to the Chamber. Welcome back.

Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions today are for the Minister of Housing. It just wouldn't be a normal session if I didn't ask for them to remove the community residency policy.

So, Mr. Speaker, will the Minister of Housing remove the community residency policy? Thank you.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Right now the Housing Corporation has taken direction into reviewing all policies within our department. Right now we are working with the Council of Leaders, which is a respected working arm for us throughout the territory. We had brought this to their table as well. I just want the Member to know that we are having those discussions, and we are going to be bringing that back to committee before the end of this government for committee to have their opportunity to make their suggestions and their comments on those changes to those policies. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4511

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I fear that while the people of the Northwest Territories have waited four years for a homelessness strategy and no changes have happened that there are policies that can change in the meantime.

If the reason the Minister says that she needs to hold on to the policy is for fairness and housing can't be distributed fairly without this policy, then why hasn't the Minister updated the point rating system to ensure fairness when housing is distributed to residents? Thank you.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And thank you to the Member for her question as well too.

Throughout my time holding the portfolio, I'm confidently wanting to say that I went to every region throughout the Northwest Territories, and I was able to speak with a number of the LHOs. I think the last number that I had was 20, and there's 23 throughout the Northwest Territories. So I had brought this up as well too, talking about the point rating system, and the LHOs didn't have too much comments to wanting to change the point rating system. And also I did speak about the residency requirements which where the LHOs do have a service agreement that is performed on behalf of Housing NWT.

The comments for that as well too is that they found that policy fair.

But I will bring that back to the LHOs. Housing NWT will be meeting with the local housing authorities regionally in the next coming months, and I will bring this back. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Yes, thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'm kind of confused then. If Housing NWT has gone to LHOs and they have said that they don't want to change their policies but Housing is speaking with the Council of Leaders about changing policies, what power does Housing NWT have then over LHOs to change policies? Thank you.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The policies are administered by Housing NWT. But I'm looking for fairness and consistency throughout the Northwest Territories and having the Council of Leaders at the table and having these discussions, looking at these policies, we have made great movement with them in talking with the federal government as well.

I did make an announcement this morning that I acknowledge what they had received throughout the territory, and I'm looking at this as a positive way to be doing and addressing housing in smaller communities as well.

And we are not waiting for the Council of Leaders to make the decision. We are looking for the recommendations and the comments from that table and the recommendations and comments from the local housing authorities. I would like to highlight their work and bring them to the table and update those service contracts as well too.

Mr. Speaker, there's a lot of work to be doing when I'm speaking about local housing authorities, and I respect the questions coming from the MLA because it really provides a lot of good feedback for us to be bringing that back. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Kam Lake.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Minister keeps speaking about fairness. But if a policy goes against the UN Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the MMIWG, on the anniversary that it was tabled, if it goes against the TRC Calls to Action, then it's not fair; it's not a fair policy, and this is not a discussion about fairness. This is a discussion about Housing having a prioritization tool that doesn't work, and they won't change it. So at what point will Housing realize that this policy has unintended consequences and they need to step in and create policies that work? Thank you.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And like I have said, we are right now, in the current time, we are reviewing those policies. As we speak, the department is working on them, and I am confident that we're going to be looking at future changes. And I know that -- you know, I've had the portfolio for three years. We are seeing significant changes throughout the Northwest Territories. And I know the Member's very passionate about this policy. She would like to see the changes made. The policy right now is out there for recommendations, for comments, and bringing that back. But I really want to stress to the Member that I did not hear any concerns from the local housing authorities when looking at the residency policy. But my commitment is to bring this back to those meetings that are happening and looking at further changes. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1146-19(2): Housing Northwest Territories Community Residency Policy
Oral Questions

Page 4512

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4512

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. My questions are for the Minister of Finance about preparation of the 2023-2024 Operations Budget.

This Minister's carried out budget consultations each of the last three years, and I support that initiative. Can the Minister tell us whether there will be public budget consultations again this with year and whether there will be any serious discussion of the need for more revenues? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4513

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Minister responsible for Finance.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4513

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would be interested to hear what one of the other colleagues might have to say about preparation of the operations budgets. But I'm happy to answer it.

And Mr. Speaker, before I do, let me just note that this process of doing the budget dialogues, or what's become budget dialogues, did come originally from other MLAs. So, you know, I do want to acknowledge that that idea came from them and it's been a helpful experience every year. We are doing it again. I had hoped to have it out a little earlier but with all the work that's happening with the impacts of the floods, it didn't get out yet.

I can say, and I'm happy to have the opportunity to say this here, is that we are looking at public engagement on July the 8th and the 19th. Again, as a virtual town hall. Likely to keep it virtual for now, Mr. Speaker, so that we can be accessible to all residents across the Northwest Territories. Then, as in keeping with prior years, we will be doing some targeted sessions in Indigenous governments, Indigenous government organizations, the Northwest Territories Association of Communities, the nonprofit sector, and business and chamber organizations. And those will be taking place over July 4th to 8th.

And Mr. Speaker, I take note of the comments around having information out early. The target for getting the materials out is June 20th. So definitely looking to be a few weeks ahead of the engagements.

There was a second question in there, Mr. Speaker, I think with respect to around discussion of the need for revenues.

Mr. Speaker, the budget dialogues presents and outlines how the budget is created, what's in the budget, tries to give a sense of where revenues come from, makes note of the fact that roughly 80 percent come from the federal government, but certainly with respect to that remaining portion, there's materials within the discussion papers that will allow some discussion around what other options there are. Thank you.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4513

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I love when I get announcements in the House. It is good news, and I thank the Minister for that. But, however, I have been disappointed over the last six years at the lack of analysis and serious consideration of new revenues for the NWT.

Can the Minister tell us whether she will revise the revenue options paper with more recent numbers, especially in light of inflation and some of the factors that I had discussed in my Member's statement, and ensure it has a more balanced approach for these budget 2023-2024 consultations. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4513

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the revenue options paper does get looked at and reviewed every year. I'm not sure that we'll ever get to a point perhaps about bringing all of us as to what should be in there or what it should say. But we do look back at it every year. And there's been changes made, thanks to the feedback that I've received specifically from the MLAs before it goes out.

With respect to this year in terms of revenue forecasts, again, certainly the point is to take into account what's happening in the world at any particular time, including this year where although we may be through the pandemic, there are quite a number of factors impacting on economics and economic circumstances not only for our government, for other governments, and for the business community.

So we'll be doing our best. Obviously that is to -- literally in the midst of happening in the moment, but we're doing our best to reflect that in the materials. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4513

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for those comments to look at the revenue options paper. I hope to get a new one. And of course the Minister's no doubt well aware of the devastating impacts of the Hay River flooding. And I'm hearing that there could be as many as 350 or 400 applications under our Disaster Assistance Policy. Government infrastructures going to require serious remediation. And, you know, we may even need to relocate folks or West Point First Nation.

So can the Minister tell us whether there is a preliminary estimate for the Hay River flood recovery costs and what impact is expected on budget 2023-2024? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4514

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Department of Finance and Municipal and Community Affairs are working together along with other impacted departments to look at the numbers, to have numbers tabulated. Registrations are still coming in, and the impacts of each of those registrations are still coming in. Not everyone is seeking the maximum. There's still parties who are inquiring as to their insurance circumstances. The pathfinders are in the communities working through those questions.

So, you know, I don't want to say that we don't have preliminary numbers because we do have certainly numbers that are being collated and tabulated along the way. But until we're in a position where there's some certainty around those numbers at least to the point of being able to give an estimate that is somewhat meaningful, then, Mr. Speaker, we're not going to be putting those out at this point. They're not helpful. They are not helpful numbers for the purpose of communicating the circumstance. But I just don't want to give the impression that we aren't already running numbers and looking at what the impacts will be because we certainly are.

And, you know, I will say we have over the last year been communicating on a monthly basis with MLAs providing some updates on what was happening in response to last year's floods. Mr. Speaker, it's my expectation we certainly will continue to do the same for the next year with respect to the recovery from the current year's floods. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4514

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Frame Lake.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4514

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that. I mentioned in my statement that inflation is expected to continue at record levels probably for the foreseeable future. I'm starting to get concerns from constituents about the impact of inflation on their quality of life, particularly those on fixed incomes.

Can the Minister tell us whether there will be increases to any NWT tax credits, increases to income support programs, or other measures to assist those NWT residents on fixed incomes as part of the budget 2023-2024? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4514

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the concerns around inflation are not limited to only those on fixed incomes. I'm certainly also hearing from all residents, from the business sector, from the non-profits concerns around inflation, rising costs, cost of fuel. They are live considerations. I'm well aware. The department's well aware. The government is well aware that these are concerns and that people are worried, and that's quite fair.

At the moment and in light of that, Mr. Speaker, there's certainly not any expectation for tax increases. With respect to tax credits, that's not under consideration at this time. I would note for folks that may be on income support or other fixed measures, other subsidies, when there's increased demand on those programs, that does come to the Financial Management Board, and in general, that would be considered more forced growth.

So, you know, there certainly is still the ability there to continue to support the people who are already receiving support type programs or support type subsidies.

With respect to whether there needs to be an entirely new type of relief, I'll continue to say what I've said in the recent days which is that when we say we're monitoring a situation, it doesn't literally mean just reading the newspapers. It does mean, in fact, monitoring the situation actively to determine at what point some other sort of additional or new relief does get to be introduced. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1147-19(2): 2023-2024 Government of the Northwest Territories Budget Preparation
Oral Questions

Page 4514

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Colleagues, before we continue, I'd like to recognize our Languages Commissioner, Ms. Brenda Gauthier. Welcome to the Chamber.

Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4514

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to continue the conversation the Member of Kam Lake was having about what housing authorities and LHOs do. I think, you know, a fair characterization of our LHOs is that they are property management companies; they are responsible for the maintenance of the units, and they are responsible for the intake. But they have no control over policies. That is directed to them by the Housing Corp. They are agents of the policies of the Housing Corp. They're not capable of doing anything that the Housing Corp does not want.

So it kind of seems to me that an odd thing to prioritize at the local level of control housing maintenance was what we really wanted.

I'm just wondering as part of the review whether we are conducting a review that would look at what the proper function or perhaps some alternative models of local control would be. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. You know, I could read off of my notes, but, you know, coming from a smaller community and looking at the actions of the local housing authorities and the boards, the chairpersons that are active at the ground level, they do provide a significant service. But it is identified there needs to be huge improvement. We need to look at those service agreements. We need to update them. We need to have more collaboration and more communication with them as well. And since having the portfolio, I recognize the gaps that are there as well.

Looking at the policies that are there and that they operate under, this is what I would like to do as a Minister: I brought the policies to the Council of Leaders. Myself and the Premier have identified that there is a need to have the Council of Leaders throughout the Northwest Territories look and review our policies, and also that I recognize that we need to give a lot more understanding and a lot more power back to the LHOs so they can challenge us with those policies and challenge us with those changes that are required. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm glad to hear that answer from the Minister that we're looking at this. One of the issues that I've heard from Yellowknife's LHO is that they would like a little bit more autonomy to apply for federal funding, and they've been approached by Indigenous governments who have asked if they would maintain and operate their buildings, something that, you know, would be doing work outside of the purview of their agency agreement with the NWT Housing Corporation.

So I think we're kind of in the worst possible situation where the LHOs do not have autonomy to go out and get money, but they are also not centralized so we are not having any of those economies of scale.

So I think we have to go one way or the other. And I'm wondering if we were reviewing areas to increase their autonomy such as applying for funding.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The local housing authorities are a contracted arm of Housing NWT. And looking at those authorities and, I guess, organizations that are wanting to apply for funding, we apply for funding on their behalf. This year we have a 90-unit housing delivery throughout the Northwest Territories. And not only that, we are looking at increasing the -- increasing the education and training as well too for our maintenance as well. I've recognized that the units that we are building are not -- I want to say they don't -- they don't compare with the amount of -- the type of training we have at the ground level with the type of furnaces, the type of boilers that we are putting in. So there is a lot of changes that are happening. I am recognizing that we need to support them in many different ways. So I'm bringing that back to the department. But I want to reassure the Member that that work is taking place. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Yes, thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I think we have to be conscientious here that there is a cost to the local housing organizations. Each one has its own buildings, its own board, its own executive directors, which means that they are not providing housing; they're providing administration.

And, you know, I know in Yellowknife, there's a great maintenance staff, but they're not allowed to go do work in Behchoko. They just do work for the Yellowknife local housing authority. There's no territorial coordination of maintenance contracts.

And so I'm wondering if any analysis has been done that could be shared that speaks to some of the efficiency or centralization that could happen or what is the cost of having LHOs, you know, all be operating independently from each other. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4515

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Right now I'm looking at opportunities for the LHOs as well too. I recognize throughout the Northwest Territories that we do have Indigenous governments that are entering into self-government as well. I'm looking at those opportunities, whether they would be able to operate on our behalf, but also looking -- going back to looking at the maintenance, that what the Member had expressed as well too. This is something -- this is an area that strongly needs to be recognized, and we need to work within this area differently.

And I hear the Member where we do have maintenance staff in Yellowknife, and we need work done in Behchoko. Right now the Housing Corporation is operating and maintaining 2,600 units in the Northwest Territories. But when you're in a smaller community and you're a homeowner, the LHOs are expected to come, and they're expected to provide that service as well too.

So I hear where the Member is coming from. I will bring that back to my department. And like I have said, it's encouraging to hear these questions come forward because it really drives change within how we do business within Housing. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1148-19(2): Functions of Local Housing Authorities
Oral Questions

Page 4516

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also would like to recognize the former Premier Bob McLeod and his wife Melody McLeod, also Brenda Gauthier and everybody else in the gallery.

Mr. Speaker, in recent years both the courts and political leaders have recognized the need for reconciliation between Indigenous people and the Crown. Generally in the First Nations Treaty 8s and Treaty 11s, it says that their aboriginal rights and titles were not affected by making those treaties. Unfinished treaty business has yet remained a cloud over much of our territory while the treaty First Nations are deprived of the benefits and recognition they deserve.

Mr. Speaker, is the Premier prepared to commit the resources and mandate necessary to complete the outstanding business with our treaty partners in the Deh Cho, Akaitcho, and Indigenous governments? Mahsi.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Honourable Premier.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The finalization of self-government agreements and land claim agreements are a trilateral agreement. It's done with the federal government, the Government of the Northwest Territories, and the Indigenous governments. We are dedicated, though, Mr. Speaker, to doing our best to make sure that the agreements are finalized; however, I'm respectful of the Indigenous governments, and the work shall be done on time on their time as well as -- so that everyone feels that they got a fair shake of it.

So it's not about rushing the agreements. It's about doing them right. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you Mr. Premier -- I mean Madam Premier. Does the Premier recognize the treaties as the reconciliation of pre-existing sovereignty of Indigenous people on this territory and the Crown. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Absolutely, within the United Nations Declaration of Indigenous People, which is a priority of this government, there is a recognition of Modern Treaties and self-government agreements, and so I will continue to uphold that agreement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Does the Premier agree that our laws and policies need to respect the inherent sovereignty of the treaty First Nations and to reconcile our authority with that of First Nations and Indigenous governments. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We wouldn't call them self-government agreements if we didn't believe in the concept of them being able to self-govern. Within all self-government agreements, there is clauses within each chapter that identify the paramountcy of laws. And many of those chapters, Mr. Speaker, the Indigenous government has paramountcy over the territorial government. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Honourable Premier. Final supplementary, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you Premier. Does the Premier support the initiative to periodically review and update all treaties and modern land claim agreements in this ongoing spirit of sharing, reconciliation, and mutual respect. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker, and thank you Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4516

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Actually I do believe that within the agreements, there is a clause that states that they can be reviewed and updated as necessary. There is a commitment to that. Again, Mr. Speaker, though, in recognizing that I am willing to work with Indigenous governments, but really, the priority, Mr. Speaker, is to try to get all Indigenous governments into a place where they have land claims that are settled and self-agreement -- self-governing agreements that are settled so that they do take their rightful place at the table. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1149-19(2): Reconciliation and Completion of Rights Agreements
Oral Questions

Page 4517

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Yesterday the Minister of Lands made a Minister's statement in the House enhancing transparency and client experience. This was about the administration of lands in the Northwest Territories in something called ATLAS, which is a pretty cool computer based information system about land here in the Northwest Territories.

So I commend the Minister for this effort in bringing more transparency to ourselves as a, you know, manager of lands. But I want to ask some specific questions about whether this new information available through ATLAS includes information about financial security that our government might hold. So if I could get the Minister to answer that, I would appreciate it. Thanks, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Minister responsible for Lands.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Department of Lands recently expanded the information and data related to land administration and is available to the public and as part of our efforts to increase transparency. The Department of lands currently tracks the form, the amount, and expiry dates for security and is working on how to make this information transparent through the public lands regulation.

At this point, lands has not included financial information related to the leases on the ATLAS system. We are looking to do this into the future.

I agree that accountability of land manages; we should be open and transparent. The Department of lands is currently reviewing the on land platform -- online platform to make -- to best make this information publicly available. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that information. And of course the reason why I raise this is our government, when we had the surface lease for the Giant Mine, we had zero dollars in financial security, zero dollars, which we actually -- we ended up on the hook for $26 million in an agreement with the federal government as our contribution because we had zero dollars for financial security on that property. Ptarmigan Mine, zero dollars for financial security for the surface. It's going to probably cost us more millions of dollars.

So can the Minister tell us when this information -- this kind of information is going to be publicly available. I know he's looking at it, but is there a date by which this information on financial security can be made available to the public. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish I could give the Member and the public a confirmed date, but presently, we don't have that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that. Of course I might be back here in October asking when it's going to be done. But can the Minister confirm that this information is actually tracked already by the department. So it's not a question of having to go and comb files to find this information. We already have it. It would be just adding additional attribute data to ATLAS. Can the Minister confirm we have this information already. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I can confirm that the annual security reporting requirement is a part of the Public Land Act, and we do have that information. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Frame Lake.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that. Of course the difficulty with the annual reporting requirements of the Public Land Act is that that act is not actually in force yet. So we're waiting for regulations. So is there a way in which this information on financial security held by our government can be made available even on an annual basis in advance of the Public Land Act coming into effect. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4517

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The department participates in the GNWT open data initiative to increase government transparency and accountability while maintaining the government's responsibility towards privacy, security, and legal obligations.

So we are working on it. The Public Land Act, as the Member said, isn't in force because we're doing the public land regulations on that. So until that is done, we're not able to provide that information publicly. We are working on it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1150-19(2): Administration of Lands and Financial Securities
Oral Questions

Page 4518

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions are for the Minister responsible for Housing. About 18 months ago, her and the Minister of Health opened the Fort Good Hope Seniors Centre, but then it didn't open. And the Minister said she would open it in the summer, and then it didn't open. And then in the fall, the Minister said it would open in the new year, and then it didn't open. And in the last session, the Minister didn't give a date when it would open next, but it was clear the lawyers were getting involved.

So my question for the Minister of Housing is when will the Fort Good Hope Seniors Home, centre, open.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the Member for the question as well too. We did end up with technical issues with the final build of this, of the construction of the nine-plex in Fort Good Hope. We're looking at hopefully a date of December of this year for the nine-plex to be open. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Mr. Speaker, that's approaching about two years since it officially opened. Perhaps the Minister could just provide a bit more of an understanding of what the technical issues are or whether this will cost us more money. Is there a new tender going out. You know, and if this can be provided at a later date, that's fine. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Once the nine-plex was completed, we did end up finding some issues when reviewing those plans and those final statements.

But I want to also say that, you know, we had just finished with our COVID-19 pandemic, and we did have a delay in responding and looking at the repairs for this, for the nine-plex. And it was -- at that time, we weren't able to get contractors in as soon as we should have been able to.

So I'm hopefully -- I'm hopeful for December of this year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1151-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4518

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Monfwi.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This question is for Premier. Mr. Speaker, this is international news. July 2022, Pope Francis is going to be in Canada to make formal apology to the Indigenous people for the trauma experienced in residential school.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to know what is the GNWT plan in this process. What action -- assistance will the government do to help the survivors and families. Thank you.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4518

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. Honourable Premier.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I think it's the right thing for the Pope to come to the Northwest Territories, to Canada to speak to the people that are survivors. I think that the Pope does deserve to give -- or the people deserve to get an apology from the Pope. However, the GNWT, Mr. Speaker, is not taking a forefront role in this visit from the Pope, but we are here to support Indigenous governments in any actions that they wish to pursue as this work goes forward. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4518

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you. Well, I was hoping that the GNWT would acknowledge and recognize the trauma the Indigenous people experienced. And we have a lot -- there's a lot of mental health issues. And I was hoping the GNWT would acknowledge and recognize.

And this is where I was going -- I was hoping that they were going to send delegates. The Indigenous government council from NWT, I was hoping that they will be attending and that they will be in charge of leading, bringing delegates to Edmonton, and that they will be paying for the full cost for people attending because that's -- I think that's the only right thing to do is for this government is to recognize and acknowledge that the trauma the Indigenous people experienced. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That's just for comment. She doesn't need to reply. Thank you.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4518

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. I'll give the Premier an opportunity to respond. Honourable Premier.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, recognizing that the GNWT does stand with the Indigenous governments on the actions with this, my understanding is the Dene Nation has taken the lead in this work. And I will make a commitment that I will reach out to the leader of the Dene Nation, Grand Chief I believe, to be able to see what kind of assistance that he needs from the GNWT. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1152-19(2): Apology from Pope Francis to Indigenous People
Oral Questions

Page 4519

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Honourable Premier. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, further to the questions just asked by my colleague from Yellowknife North, the Minister responded -- sorry. These questions are for the Minister of Housing NWT. The Minister responded that they found issues with the plan. But the building was already built by that point. I've been in it. I had the honour of going to see the building with the Minister of Housing NWT. And it's a beautiful, beautiful building, and I think, you know, every community in the territory would love one.

But the building was already built, Mr. Speaker. So why were the issues with the plan not caught before the building was built. Thank you.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And thank you to the Member for the question as well too. Those issues were discovered after the building was built. Right now we are dealing with those -- with this within the corporation -- within Housing NWT. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, what lessons has Housing NWT learned result of this, or what are they doing to ensure that this does not happen again. Thank you.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Once that -- I discovered that we had issues with the final completion of this building, looking at the plans that had come forward, and looking at the comments made by the -- sorry. I just -- I can't remember at the top of my head. The building inspectors. The final inspections, we did have issues with that after the building was constructed.

I brought this back to Housing NWT. And we need to work more closely when we are looking at these contracts, we are putting them out for tender. Contractors need to be better supported. And looking at the phases where they are constructing our buildings, our assets, we need to be further more involved so we could avoid something like this happening again in the future. It's really unfortunate that we had gotten to this stage. But housing needed to be involved a lot more. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. The question was already asked, but I'll ask it again. What is the anticipated additional cost of this, and is this expected to come forward in a sup or be funded from within. Thank you.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I don't have those details. I'm not prepared to be answering these questions right now. But I'm just going on the briefing that I've had recently. I don't have those final numbers. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Kam Lake.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. My final question is, will the Minister provide this information to Members on this side of the House. My concern is that Members recently negotiated additional funding for the NWT Housing, and the intent of that money is not to go towards stuff like this; it's to open up more housing and to repair houses that need repair so that people can get housing. And so I'm hoping that this doesn't come at the cost of that. Thank you.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4519

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I hear the Member when it -- you know, we're looking at putting more housing on the ground. And I want to make sure that, you know, I'm clear when we are looking at the housing delivery throughout the Northwest Territories that we are committed to putting those units on the ground.

And I do appreciate the advocation on the other side, providing additional funding to this portfolio for us to enhance our housing delivery as well.

But in this case for the nine-plex in Fort Good Hope, it had come up with a number and several issues once the building was completed. And there are further technical issues as well where we had to get outside contractors to come in as well.

The community has expressed a lot of interest. They have expressed further updates as well. We do have a housing waitlist. I know the impacts of a nine-plex in a smaller community is -- it's really top of the discussion at the ground level, and people are waiting to be moving into these units as well. I do understand the urgency to get this nine-plex up and going and having the transfer of elders into these units as well too. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1153-19(2): Fort Good Hope Seniors' Facility
Oral Questions

Page 4520

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Hay River South.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I apologize to the Minister of MACA for not providing these questions, but I've got to take one more shot at plugging questions.

Mr. Speaker, the floodplain in Hay River has just been expanded both in Hay River and K'atlodeeche. Has the Minister of MACA and his department considered how the department will proceed with future mitigation support measures based on this new reality. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Minister responsible for MACA.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I'd like to take it under notice being the last question of the day here. I respect the Member.

Yes, in the conversations with the Member on this is this is part of our learning process. We learnt from our last flood and the situation from Little Buffalo, Jean Marie, Fort Simpson, and Fort Good Hope, and a little bit Aklavik. So we learnt from that. We started working on that.

But as we move forward, we are going to be doing this in the future. This is part of our learning experience. Thank you. And it will be addressed in the next unfortunate flood situation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I realize we're just now completing, you know, assessments, but it's important to begin to look forward. And what, if anything, is the department doing to start talking mitigation. I'm hoping that, you know, they keep talking about learning from one flood to another. So, you know, after this flood, I'm hoping they learned quite a bit and they have some type of idea of how they're going to look at mitigation. Thank you.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as I said before, we work with the residents; we work with the communities. As well as we move up the river, we start working with the communities as well that have -- who weren't impacted so far this year. But we are working with them. We are seeing what -- there's some needs.

One of the questions that was proposed [sic] to me today was if a resident is impacted and we have to do some mitigation for them but the resident next door doesn't, what can we do with that. So we are going to reach out to the federal government. We're going to work with the communities.

We're also working with the residents to see if they wish to move. And if they do wish to move, then that there is part of the process there.

So each community has some challenges, and we work with them throughout the process. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the reality is is that, you know, you might have one House that got hit by flooding and the one next to it didn't, and for what -- you know, for whatever reason, and, you know, the people now who are -- probably have homes that are below the flood risk elevations that were set years ago, they may be looking for supports. So will any support be provided to those in the floodplain that want to access funds to put in place mitigation measures, such as rising their -- raising their homes or, you know, berms or whatever to protect their homes, and will moved flood risk elevations be set as part of this process. Thank you.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you. 3 A, B, C, and D questions. I'll try to get them all answered here. And if I don't, I apologize to the Member.

Unfortunately, no. If the residents have not been impacted by the disaster, then we don't have funding for them. But it's something that we are going to reach out to the federal government to have that conversation with them, to ask them if we can make that part of the federal government's program. So we are going to work with them on that there.

And I apologize. I missed the other questions. So you may have to ask them again. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4520

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary, Member for Hay River South.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, climate change and flooding has been a reality here for the last while. So I'd ask the Minister will he consider bolstering his staff complement to deal with climate change and flooding. So, you know, what I'm looking for is, you know, we need expertise on climate change, on hydrology, and flood mitigation. Thank you.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, we actually just hired our climate change specialist in the department. He has vast experience in climate change, and he is now in place with the department. In regards to the bolstering other staff, like, we've had our EMO staff; we've created five new positions; we have three positions at headquarters. So we're working on that.

With ENR and that department there, we've also worked on creating and finding positions that will help deal with this. We've bolstered some of our staff as the government across the Northwest Territories. So we are looking at where we can help and that.

And as the Member said, climate change is the reality. We're living it. Not when it's going to happen. We're living it. It's impacting us. And so we're trying to move forward on this. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Colleagues, our time for oral questions has expired. Honourable Premier.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to go back to recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Honourable Premier.

Oral Question 1154-19(2): Lessons Learned and Mitigation of Future Flooding in Hay River
Oral Questions

Page 4521

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent. Thank you.

---Unanimous consent granted

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

June 3rd, 2022

Page 4521

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Honourable Premier.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4521

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to recognize the former Premier Bob McLeod, who is in the gallery. Today the Legislative Assembly will be unveiling his portrait to join the other previous Premiers.

Premier McLeod dedicated his life and career to making the Northwest Territories a better place for residents and businesses. He worked in civil service for 28 years, including serving as a deputy minister in three different departments as well as secretary to Cabinet during the 15th Assembly.

He was first elected in 2007 as the MLA for Yellowknife South. In his first term as MLA, he was elected to Cabinet and became the Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Premier McLeod was acclaimed in 2011, easy ride, and put his name forward for Premier, defeating two other candidates to become our 12th Premier of the Northwest Territories. In 2015, Premier McLeod made history, becoming the first two-term Premier of the Northwest Territories.

Premier McLeod was always willing to do what was needed to make the Northwest Territories a better place for current and future generations, and we thank him for his dedication to the people of the Northwest Territories.

Mr. Speaker, on a personal note, though, I have nothing but respect for Premier McLeod and I am honoured that I was a Member of his Cabinet. Premier McLeod never told me what not to do. He never had to. When he felt I was off track, he only had to give me "the look", and I knew he was not happy. Mr. Speaker, I know Premier McLeod is a quiet, humble man, and probably not comfortable with being formally recognized in the House. So I purposely am not looking at him in the gallery for fear of once again getting "the look" he's so famous for. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4521

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Honourable Premier. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Deh Cho.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to applaud former Premier of NWT, a two-term Premier, Mr. Bob McLeod, and I applaud the Premier for her tribute to Mr. McLeod for his service to the Northwest Territories. And also the fact that Bob McLeod is from Fort Providence. His friends and everybody lived there. There was a rumour that his prolific hockey career began on an ice puddle with one skate and a willow stick. So I believe he carried it on to his son, Warren, who is also here, and to his grandsons. I think Carter is down in a recognized hockey school so we wish him the best. I hope to see him in the NHL at some point. And from my aunt's, on my extended family's side, he's in the building somewhere, he's the Metis president, Mr. Clifford McLeod, and also Languages Commissioner, Brenda Gauthier, is here with us. They're all from Fort Providence. And Lorraine Whitman who is also here, moved back to Providence after a long GNWT career. I'd like everyone to join me in a round of applause for all these people in the visitors gallery. Mahsi.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Thebacha.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize former Premier McLeod and his wonderful wife Melody. I graduated with this couple from high school, and so I know all the secrets of the past.

And I also want to thank Premier McLeod. When I was in leadership with the Salt River First Nation, Mr. McLeod and other ministers, that are still here in this House, helped that file greatly, and I really appreciate that leadership. Thank you so much.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm glad that I ran out to use the washroom because I was able to actually look back at the gallery, and I would like to recognize Father Joe Daley, one of my constituents, here in the gallery. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Hay River North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I also want to recognize my former colleague, former Premier Bob McLeod. And now being on this side of the House as a Minister, I also want to apologize to the Member, former Premier; I'm getting my comeuppance. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River North. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize our former Premier. Although I was not in his Cabinet, or in his Assembly, you know, I've heard a lot of great things about him and his leadership. And welcome to his family as well.

But I'd also like to recognize Shannon McLeod. Her and I went to the Aurora College, graduated from the nursing program. And she's still doing that and now I'm doing this. So maybe I can convince her to come down on the floor with me. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife South.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would also like to recognize Melody and Bob McLeod. They continue to be residents of Yellowknife South. I didn't have the honour or the pleasure of working in this House at the same time as Bob McLeod, but I can say that the very first time I ever walked down the executive hallway was with the gracious welcome of the then Premier to welcome me into his office and give me a few words of wisdom for which I was always very grateful. So welcome back.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

(audio)...in the House. Mr. Speaker, I am always very pleased when young residents from Yellowknife South attend the House. And this morning I have young Abigale Unka here in the House, who is my next door neighbour. Also with her, Mr. Speaker, is Dora Unka who I think is almost like a resident of Yellowknife South given how often she is there next door also taking care of my children at times. Mr. Speaker, I'm not sure if my colleague can see or not, but I understand young Laila Pegg is also in the House. It's wonderful to have the young people here watching what we do so that they can come and fill our shoes some day. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife South. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nahendeh.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4522

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to recognize a former constituent, Father Joe Daley. I've had numerous conversations with this very intelligent person, and he's given me some good wisdom and advice as we moved forward, even before I got into politics.

As well, I'd like to recognize former friend of mine and former recreation professional, Clifford McLeod.

Now I'm going to thank, of course, Mr. Bob McLeod and Melody. Mr. McLeod, I had the pleasure of actually working him as my deputy minister. So I've had the pleasure of watching him work at the bureaucratic level and now I've had the opportunity last Assembly to watch his leadership and his ability to make differences for the residents of the Northwest Territories, and that's what we all try to achieve for us. But I'd also like to thank him and recognize that he now gets to spend the time to watch his grandchildren play hockey there. So welcome to the House. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4523

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nahendeh. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Kam Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4523

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I always love when there are additional children in the room with us today. And thank you very much to the Member for Yellowknife South. She is right - there are blind spots in this room, and I can't see. So welcome to Laila Pegg for being in the House today, and thank you for joining us. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4523

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Once again, I'd like to thank everybody for coming in today. It really lightened the atmosphere in the room today. I hope you all enjoyed the proceedings. And always good to have an audience. Mahsi.

Colleagues, we will call a short recess. Thank you.

---SHORT RECESS

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery (reversion)

Page 4523

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Okay, written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written Question 44-19(2): Contracts for Work Related to the Slave Geological Corridor
Written Questions

Page 4523

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Now that's a tough act to follow.

My questions, I have three sets of written questions. The first one, my question's for the Minister of Infrastructure.

Please provide a list of all contracts entered into by the Government of the Northwest Territories for work related to the Slave Geological Province Corridor from April 1, 2020 to present, and:

  1. Indicate the date of the contract signing, date of completion or anticipated completion, whether the contract was sole-sourced, the value of the contract, the general purpose and scope of work, whether there were any financial or scope amendments and a summary of same, the name and location of the contractor;
  2. In providing the list of contracts, indicate whether any of the contractors were or are registered under the Business Incentive Policy and received such consideration in the evaluation of bids or proposals; and
  3. What future actions are planned to maximize northern employment, training, and business opportunities in future contracts related to the Slave Geological Province Corridor.

Number two, my question's for the Minister of Infrastructure.

Written Question 46-19(2): Contracts for Work Related to the Taltson Hydro Expansion
Written Questions

Page 4523

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Please provide a list of all contracts entered into by GNWT for work related to the Taltson Hydro Expansion, including studies on submarine transmission lines, from April 1, 2020 to present, and:

  1. Indicate the date of the contract signing, date of completion or anticipated completion, whether the contract was sole-sourced, the value of the contract, the general purpose or scope of work, whether there were any financial or scope amendments and a summary of same, the name and location of the contractor;
  2. In providing the list of contracts, indicate whether any of the contractors were or are registered under the Business Incentive Policy and received such consideration in the evaluation of bids or proposals; and
  3. What future actions are planned to maximize northern employment, training, and business opportunities in future contracts related to the Taltson Hydro Expansion.

Written Question 46-19(2): Contracts for Work Related to the Taltson Hydro Expansion
Written Questions

Page 4523

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Before we continue, please be mindful of the interpreters. They're in overdrive right now. Written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written Question 46-19(2): Contracts for Work Related to the Taltson Hydro Expansion
Written Questions

Page 4523

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I apologize to the interpreters and the House.

Written Question 46-19(2): Post-Devolution Mining Revenues to the Government of the Northwest Territories
Written Questions

Page 4523

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

My questions are for the Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

The "Review of Royalty Regulations in the Development of Resources Legislation in the NWT" research paper states that "government and investors should share pre-tax cash flow over the life of a mine roughly on a 50:50 basis." There are a number of scattered references to post-devolution government revenues in this research paper but no clear, systematic, and detailed presentation of post-devolution government revenues from mining.

Please provide the average annual total of retained revenues from mining to the Government of the NWT from April 1, 2014 to March 31, 2022 including the following:

  1. An itemized listing of all the sources of revenues included in the annual average retained revenues (For example, mining royalties, corporate taxes, property taxes, payroll tax, fuel tax, and any other revenues);
  2. The average annual value of diamonds and any other minerals produced and exported from the NWT over this period of time;
  3. The average annual values of any mining revenues shared with Indigenous governments over this period of time; and
  4. An analysis of whether the net retained revenues from mining to the Government of the Northwest Territories meets the target of between 40 to 60 percent of pre-tax cash flow generated by a project as the government share, as recommended by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund.

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Written Question 46-19(2): Post-Devolution Mining Revenues to the Government of the Northwest Territories
Written Questions

Page 4524

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written Question 46-19(2): Post-Devolution Mining Revenues to the Government of the Northwest Territories
Written Questions

Page 4524

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I've done my three.

Written Question 46-19(2): Post-Devolution Mining Revenues to the Government of the Northwest Territories
Written Questions

Page 4524

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Okay, sorry.

You still have one more to go. No, I'm just kidding.

Written questions. Member for Monfwi.

Written Question 47-19(2): Status of Housing Renovations in the Tlicho Region
Written Questions

Page 4524

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Status of housing renovation in the Tlicho region.

Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

According to the budget for this fiscal year, there were 22 housing units that were to be renovated in Behchoko during this fiscal year. Summer is here and renovations should be underway, but the community has not seen progress.

Mr. Speaker, my question for the Minister is how many units in Behchoko are actually being renovated in 2022-2023; and further, for those units:

  1. How many of the units renovated are empty units that will be renovated to make them available to people on the waiting list;
  2. How many of the renovation contracts were awarded to businesses located in the Tlicho region;
  3. How many Tlicho residents received training or apprenticeship through the renovation projects in Behchoko; and
  4. How many renovations of units will be completed by the end of the current fiscal year.

Thank you.

Written Question 47-19(2): Status of Housing Renovations in the Tlicho Region
Written Questions

Page 4524

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. Written questions. Returns to written questions. Replies to the Commissioner's address. Petitions. Reports of committees on the review of bills. Reports of standing and special committees. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Environment and Natural Resources.

Tabled Document 673-19(2): NWT State of Environment Report 2022
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4524

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following document, NWT State of Environmental Report 2022. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 673-19(2): NWT State of Environment Report 2022
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4524

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Finance.

Tabled Document 674-19(2): 2022-23 Consolidated Budget Tabled Document 675-19(2): Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022) Tabled Document 676-19(2): Socio-Economic Analysis of Parsons' Procurement at the Giant Mine Site - Summary, May 11, 2022
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following three documents, 2022-23 Consolidated Budget; Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022; and, Socio-Economic Analysis of Parsons' Procurement at the Giant Mine Site - Summary. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 674-19(2): 2022-23 Consolidated Budget Tabled Document 675-19(2): Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2021 to March 31, 2022) Tabled Document 676-19(2): Socio-Economic Analysis of Parsons' Procurement at the Giant Mine Site - Summary, May 11, 2022
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Housing NWT.

Tabled Document 677-19(2): The Cost of Addressing Core Housing Need in the Northwest Territories
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wish to table the following document, The Cost of Addressing Core Housing Need in the Northwest Territories. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 677-19(2): The Cost of Addressing Core Housing Need in the Northwest Territories
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Health and Social Services.

Tabled Document 678-19(2): Child and Family Services Quality Improvement Plan and the Strategic Approach to System Reform 2019-2021, April 2022 Tabled Document 679-19(2): Northwest Territories Health and Social Services System Human Resources Plan 2021-2024
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents, Child and Family Services Quality Improvement Plan and the Strategic Approach to System Reform April 2022; and, Northwest Territories Health and Social Services System Human Resources Plan 2021-2024. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 678-19(2): Child and Family Services Quality Improvement Plan and the Strategic Approach to System Reform 2019-2021, April 2022 Tabled Document 679-19(2): Northwest Territories Health and Social Services System Human Resources Plan 2021-2024
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents.

Tabled Document 680-19(2): Summary of Members' Absences for the Period February 21 to May 25, 2022
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4525

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Colleagues, pursuant to Section 5 of the indemnities, allowances and expense regulations of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act, I wish to table the summary of Members' absences for the period February 21st to May 25th, 2022.

Tabling of documents. Notices of motion. Motions. Member for Kam Lake.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4525

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth.

WHEREAS Statistics Canada's projects lower population growth from 2018 to 2043 for the Northwest Territories, at 9 per cent, than for Canada, at 25 per cent;

AND WHEREAS the Northwest Territories Bureau of Statistics projects that by 2035, the population will decline in 18 of 33 communities, including Inuvik (-407 residents), Fort Simpson (-233 residents), Fort Smith (-80 residents), Fort Resolution (-68 residents), Whati (-68 residents), Fort Providence (-64 residents), and Tuktoyaktuk (-42 residents);

AND WHEREAS over 6,300 dwellings, or 43 percent, in the Northwest Territories have an affordability, adequacy, or suitability issue, and upwards of 900 households are on the public housing waitlist, despite a stagnating population;

AND WHEREAS growth in Territorial Formula Financing, which provides an average of 70 per cent of the Government of the Northwest Territories' revenues, relies heavily on Northwest Territories population growth relative to Canada;

AND WHEREAS population growth of the Northwest Territories is one of the most effective ways to increase federal transfer payments and government revenues;

AND WHEREAS the Government of the Northwest Territories' Mandate for the 19th Assembly directs Cabinet to increase the number of resident healthcare professionals by at least 20 per cent;

AND WHEREAS the Northwest Territories' faces acute labour shortages in the next decade, including 13,700 total job openings, 270 for nurses, and 140 for other professional occupations in health;

AND WHEREAS other Canadian jurisdictions are offering increasingly competitive publicly-funded benefits for healthcare workers, such as recruitment benefits and fertility treatments;

AND WHEREAS the Northwest Territories does not fulfill its annual immigration quota allotted by the Government of Canada through the nominee program;

AND WHEREAS the Northwest Territories offers one of, if not the most, competitive post-secondary student financial assistance in the country;

AND WHEREAS the rising cost of living, which is reaching 30-year high, can be reduced by increasing our territorial population;

AND WHEREAS the Government of the Northwest Territories lacks a unified framework to sustain and grow the territory's population;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Yellowknife North, that this Legislative Assembly calls upon the Government of the Northwest Territories to create a comprehensive strategy to match Canada's population growth;

AND FURTHER, that this strategy aimed to sustain the population of each community and grow the territory's overall population by 25 percent by 2043;

AND FURTHERMORE, that this strategy is linked with a goal to add at least 3,700 new homes, or 25 percent, by 2043 and an update to each community's housing plan to make this priority;

AND FURTHERMORE, that this strategy bring together existing policies, programs, and campaigns aimed at keeping residents in the North and attracting new residents;

AND FURTHERMORE, that this strategy include:

  • an analysis of what brings people to the North;
  • an analysis of what keeps residents in the North;
  • a plan to address the increasing cost of living to keep residents in the North;
  • an immigration strategy;
  • a communication strategy to attract people to the North; and
  • a review of business programs to help residents establish and grow their business in the North;

AND FURTHERMORE, that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a comprehensive response to this motion within 120 days.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4526

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Kam Lake.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4526

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise to give points related to my motion for a strategy to retain, sustain, and grow the NWT's population.

I came to the 19th Assembly with the intent of empowering our North in three key areas: People, land, and prosperity. And it's been important to me to identify what links each of these three elements, how they work together to help us respond to the opportunities pulling us into our future.

People are both our greatest resource and biggest scarcity in the Northwest Territories. People make our houses into homes and our lands into communities. They power the industries that generate prosperity from our opportunity-rich land in infrastructure, tourism, mineral resource development, remediation, small business, public administration, and so much more. Most importantly it is the giftings of each Northerner and the cultural diversity of our population as a whole that truly make the Northwest Territories an incredible place to live.

Mr. Speaker, that's why it's so important that every resident who wants to live in the North, who wants to stay in their home community, that they have the means to do so. But for too many residents staying is not a viable choice.

The official statistics show the accumulative impact of many individuals' choices to leave. In any given year, about 2,000 residents leave the NWT for another province or territory. It's impossible to know exactly why these people choose to leave, but the high cost of living is one reason Northerners tell me they are pulling up their roots and, sadly, looking south.

In many northern communities, difficult job prospects or inadequate public services also push people to bigger centres, hollowing out our small communities, or out of the territory. According to the bureau of statistics, 17 of our 33 communities actually lost residents from July 2020 to July 2021. That's more than half of our communities.

Some communities are experiencing persistent significant declines.

Inuvik, which once counted over 3,600 residents has fallen back to 3,300. Fort Smith's population has shrunk every year since 2016. Fort Providence has lost over 60 people since 2001. While Fort McPherson in your own riding, Mr. Speaker, has lost almost a hundred people. The hollowing out of regional centres and small communities is not reconciliation.

Article 3 of the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigenous Peoples proclaims that Indigenous people have a right to self-determination, to freely pursue their economic, social, and cultural development, but depopulation in our small communities undermines the capacity for local decision-making. It takes away the residents who might staff the local health centre, manage the local waste facility, spearhead grassroots community wellness initiatives, care for aging elders, or run for elected office.

Mr. Speaker, like the rest of the world, our population is also aging and retiring, and my colleague to my left routinely reminds me that I better be ready to help look after him some day. For aging in place to truly work and for the North to afford to continue to improve elder and seniors care, we need people to fill a robust economy of care throughout our territory.

We need to focus on retention. However, at present, the government doesn't have a unified strategy to sustain, much less grow, our population.

Some of the pieces are already there. The land is beautiful. Our people, resourceful. Our communities, resilient. And the territory is rich with enormous economic potential even if not yet fully recognized.

Some of the policy pieces are already there too. For example, our student financial assistance is intelligently designed to support post-secondary education pursuits and incentivizing Northerners to stay in the North post graduation.

But we need so much more, Mr. Speaker.

An overriding strategy to increase our population must consolidate existing strengths and implement more smart programs and policies. It must start with an analysis of what brings people to the North and what keeps people in the North.

The GNWT has already done similar work on a smaller scale, looking at recruitment and retention in the healthcare sector and among Indigenous employees. We need that now at a bigger scale to understand, at the community and territory level, why people come, why people stay, and what pushes people to leave. This analysis will certainly find that the cost of living is a huge factor. That's why any strategy to sustain and grow our population must include a plan to address the high and rising cost of living.

The population strategy must also include an immigration strategy. Right now, we have a nominee program that's undersubscribed. By comparison, other jurisdictions in similar straits are doing so much more and achieving real success.

The Yukon has a community pilot program that promotes immigration to smaller communities by giving newcomers a two-year location restricted open work permit. The Atlantic immigration program brought Nova Scotia over 4,000 newcomers in four years where 40 percent of designated employers were outside of Halifax. Nova Scotia's ten-year retention rate, the share of newcomers who come and who are still in the province ten years later, is almost three in every five newcomers.

Beyond immigration, other countries are focusing on solutions to curb the great urban migration. Japan designated a program that gives away homes in small communities to sustain the population in rural areas.

Housing is a key pillar of an NWT population growth strategy. I've had conversations with colleagues on this side of the House about the crisis we're already in. We're struggling to house the population we already have before even considering new residents. That's why this motion specifically calls to build thousands of homes in the next decades.

Housing is a human right, one that the government must ensure and plan for now and in the long term, Mr. Speaker.

The population strategy must also include a communication strategy to let the world know what the NWT has to offer, as well as a review of business programs to help small business owners start and grow their businesses.

The last piece of this strategy involves setting a growth target. Current demographic shifts in the territory are putting incredible strain on communities, employers, and public finances. The territorial formula financing, which provides two-thirds of the government's revenues, grows with our population. If our population grows slower than Canada's, as it is projected, then our revenues will grow slowly. At the same time costs continue to rise.

The pandemic exposed economic and social gaps in our society and has increased the urgency to address these issues. In the days since entering an endemic, inflation, increasing cost of living, and what is looking like the most expensive flood recovery in the NWT's history have continued to exacerbate the urgency to address our social issues and created further strain on our fiscal situation. Effectively, Mr. Speaker, we cannot afford not to grow.

Growth is transformative, and it is not at the cost of Northerners. Growth is to the benefit of Northerners. Multiple business owners have told me that they can realize their full potential or afford to be innovative because they do not have the people power to do so.

Mr. Speaker, I want to be clear. This strategy does not negate the need to nurture, educate, train, employ, and care for the people of the Northwest Territories. It is in partnership with these vital priorities and to support our dream of a stronger more prosperous north. That's why I'm calling for a strategy to match Canada's population growth. I'm asking this House to endorse a comprehensive plan to ensure that the future of the NWT is sustained by empowering the residents, both here and those to come, to thrive in our beautiful territory.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Great Slave.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, there's no way that I can follow what my colleague from Kam Lake said so eloquently and in great detail. I want to thank her for bringing this motion forward because I think it's really captured the high level sort of issues in many of the regions or areas we've been discussing and sort of brings it all back together, and it is about our people, ensuring that our people are set up for success and that we have enough of them, as we often talk about the lack of capacity in the North and that people are our greatest resources and our assets. I just wanted to get up and not try to remotely elaborate further on what my colleague said but rather to say that I agree with her, and I support this motion. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Monfwi.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, I do agree, and I do support this motion. At this time, I know that we -- a lot of our community members are migrating. This motion will put more emphasis, pressure on the Housing to build more houses in small communities, create more employment, and reduce high cost of living, especially in small communities.

At this time, there are a lot of people in the North that are -- it's because of the high cost of living, it is difficult for them to make ends meet therefore I do support this motion. Thank you.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4528

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I appreciate the Member bringing this motion forward. And I do think that much of this information exists, but the GNWT needs to make sure it is put together and there's some sort of coherent vision.

As often is repeated in this House, the NWT is in a labour shortage. We have more jobs than people. And the extent of that labour shortage is truly unique. This territory, if you take our GDP per capita, we have one of the highest in the world. No doubt, because we have three diamond mines, but we all know that those diamond mines operate with a large fly in/fly out workforce, and there needs to be more targeted efforts to turn those essentially remote workers into residents of the Northwest Territories.

We also know that our territory has long had a boom and bust cycle. That is one of the main reasons Inuvik is seeing a population decline. Norman Wells, with Imperial closing, is in a similar position. And it raises a lot of fundamental philosophical questions about what to do when demographic trends are happening like this. You know, to a certain extent, we are all -- government can only do so much to buck a demographic trend. Everyone is getting older in this territory, and many people are leaving. But continued population decline in a community, well, it's by definition not sustainable but it also kind of gets to the heart of a cultural identity and what we're trying to do. We are dealing with some large global forces of urbanization and people moving to urban centres, and there's only so much we can do. But I think if we put this all together, and we track those demographic trends, that there are multiple levers and tools you could pull to make sure that, you know, we are not shocking our communities into losing 20 percent of their population as some are projected to do. We are not shocking the opposite way whereas Yellowknife, people come to the urban centre, doesn't have enough housing and gets to a zero percent vacancy rate in its housing. So all of this needs to be looked together with a bit more of a strategic lens, and I believe that's what this motion will accomplish. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Deh Cho.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I will support this motion. The bureau of statistics paints a grim picture of the population decrease for the Northwest Territories, including in many of the smaller communities. We are not certain as to what the root cause is. Is it attributable to the cost of living in the North? Is it the lack of jobs in the communities? The lack of healthcare professionals in the NWT is of the utmost concern. An analysis of all these concerns raised in this motion is direly required. This is important for the vision of the Northwest Territories. Mahsi.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Deh Cho. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Frame Lake.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the mover and the seconder of the motion. I know the mover's obviously done quite a bit of work on this.

I do have a problem with the word "growth", quite frankly. You know, we do live on a finite planet and growth in some parts of the world, we just cannot sustain it any further without getting another planet somewhere. But I understand that the thrust of this is really about trying to maintain programs and services and sort of critical mass of folks in parts of the Northwest Territories, so I can support it.

We do have to start, I think, to pay a closer attention to the evidence, the data, that is produced by the bureau of stats on our behalf, the demographic change that's taking place here in the Northwest Territories, and all of this in the context of a climate emergency. You know, we have to start to think about climate refugees here, Mr. Speaker. People are going to want to move here because they have nowhere else to go on this planet. We have to start to think about that very carefully.

I also think that we have to plan for the sustainability of our small communities. We just can't leave it to chance that people are going to stay in small communities but if we want them to thrive and people to have a good quality of life, we have to plan for that. And I don't think we've brought it together in a way that is going to ensure that that happens. And that's what I think this motion is aimed at, and I'll support it. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 58-19(2): A Strategy to Match Canada's Population Growth, Carried
Motions

Page 4529

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining. Thank you.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4529

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Abstain.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: Ten in favour, zero opposed, seven abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Motions. Member for Thebacha.

Motion 59-19(2): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 13, 2022, Carried
Motions

Page 4530

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

I MOVE, second by the honourable Member for Hay River North, that when this House adjourns on Friday, June 3rd, 2022, it shall be adjourned until Thursday, October 13, 2022;

AND FURTHERMORE, that at any time prior to October 13, 2022, if the Speaker is satisfied, after consultation with the Executive Council and Members of the Legislative Assembly, that the public interest requires that the House should meet an earlier time during the adjournment or at a time later than the scheduled resumption of the House, the Speaker may give notice and thereupon the House shall meet at the time stated in such notice and shall transact its business as if it had been duly adjourned to that time.

Motion 59-19(2): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 13, 2022, Carried
Motions

Page 4530

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Thebacha. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 59-19(2): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 13, 2022, Carried
Motions

Page 4530

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4530

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

For.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 4531

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Motions. Notices of motion for the first reading of bills. First reading of bills. Minister responsible for Finance.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023
First Reading Of Bills

Page 4531

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present to the House Bill 54, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, to be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023
First Reading Of Bills

Page 4531

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 8.2(3), Bill 54, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, has been presented, deemed read for the first time, and is ready for second reading.

First reading of bills. Minister responsible for Finance.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act, (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023
First Reading Of Bills

Page 4531

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to present to the House Bill 55, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, to be read for the first time.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act, (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023
First Reading Of Bills

Page 4531

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 8.2(3), Bill 55, Supplementary Appropriations Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, has been presented, deemed read for the first time, and is ready for second reading.

First reading of bills. Second reading of bills. Minister responsible for Finance.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4531

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Nahendeh, that Bill 54, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, be read for the second time.

This bill makes supplementary appropriations for operations expenditures of the Government of the Northwest Territories for the 2022-2023 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Some Hon. Members

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining from second reading.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

The Member for Sahtu.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

The Member for Range Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 16 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Bill 54 has had second reading.

Second reading of bills. Minister responsible for Finance.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act, (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, that Bill 55, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, be read for the second time.

This bill makes supplementary appropriations for infrastructure expenditures of the Government of the Northwest Territories for the 2022-2023 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act, (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act, (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4532

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining from the second reading.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Against.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

For.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Recorded Vote
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4533

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 16 in favour, one opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Bill 55 has had second reading.

Second reading of bills. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of bills and other matters, Bill 23, 29, Committee Report 30-19(2), Committee Report 31-19(2).

By the authority given to me as Speaker by Motion 1-19(2), I hereby authorize the House to sit beyond the daily hours of adjournment to consider the business before the House, with Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes in the chair.

---SHORT RECESS

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4533

The Chair Lesa Semmler

I will now call Committee of the Whole to order. What is the wish of committee? Member for Frame Lake.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4533

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Madame le President. The committee wishes to consider Committee Report 31-19(2) and Committee Report 30-19(2). Mahsi.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4533

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Does committee agree?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you, committee. We will proceed with the first item.

Committee, we've agreed to consider Committee Report 31-19(2), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40, An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act.

I will go to the chair of Standing Committee on Social Development for any opening comments. Member for Kam Lake.

Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. Madam Chair, the committee's report was read into the record on Tuesday, May 31st, 2022. Bill 40 received second reading in the Legislative Assembly on November 26th, 2021, and was referred to the Standing Committee on Social Development for review.

Near the end of the Committee's 120-day review period, the Government of the Northwest Territories' Department of Health and Social Services identified issues with the bill that could require substantial amendments.

On March 28, 2022, committee sought and received an extension for our review period and indicated that we were willing to work collaboratively with the Minister of Health and Social Services to make improvements to the bill.

On May 16, 2022, the standing committee was pleased to have a public hearing with Dr. Katherine Breen of the Northwest Territories Medical Association to hear their views on Bill 40 and on the work that had been done to improve the bill.

On May 19, 2022, the standing committee held a public hearing with the Minister of Health and Social Services and completed its clause-by-clause review of the bill.

Ten motions were carried by the committee and concurred with by the Minister. The committee thanks the Minister and department for their hard work and collaboration to improve this bill.

Individual Members may have comments on the report, and I would like to thank committee for their dedicated work in seeing this bill through to today. Thank you very much, Madam Chair.

Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. I will now open the floor to general comments on Committee Report 31-19(2).

Seeing that there are no comments, MLA for Kam Lake.

Committee Motion 245-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Standards of Practice for Physicians Practicing in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Minister of Health and Social Services engage the services of an independent body, such as other Colleges of Physicians, to develop standards of practice for physicians practicing in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 245-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Standards of Practice for Physicians Practicing in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 245-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Standards of Practice for Physicians Practicing in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 245-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Standards of Practice for Physicians Practicing in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. MLA for Kam Lake.

Committee Motion 246-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on Proposed Standards for Physicians in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4534

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Madam Chair. Madam Chair, I MOVE that this committee recommends that The Government of the Northwest Territories work with the Northwest Territories Medical Association to ensure they have the ability to meaningfully participate when they are consulted on any proposed standards for physicians in the NWT. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 246-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on Proposed Standards for Physicians in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 246-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on Proposed Standards for Physicians in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 246-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on Proposed Standards for Physicians in the Northwest Territories, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. MLA for Kam Lake.

Committee Motion 247-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on with Territorial Physician Executive, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Department of Health and Social Services consult with the local physician leadership from the territorial physician executive to understand certification requirements, differential treatment of family physicians compared to other specialists, and the administration of conditional licenses. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 247-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on with Territorial Physician Executive, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 247-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on with Territorial Physician Executive, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 247-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on with Territorial Physician Executive, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

I will call a recess.

---SHORT RECESS

Committee Motion 247-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Consultation on with Territorial Physician Executive, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

I now call Committee of the Whole back to order. There was a fire alarm, and we -- thank you to the Yellowknife Fire Department for coming and making sure we're safe. And now we'll carry on. MLA for Kam Lake.

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Madam Chair. Just to confirm, we are on Motion No. 4.

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to the recommendations contained in this report within 120 days. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried.

Thank you, committee. Do you agree that you have concluded consideration of Committee Report 31-19(2), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40, An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act?

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Motion 248-19(2): Committee Report 31-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you, committee. We have concluded consideration of Committee Report 31-19(2), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 40, an Act to Amend the Medical Profession act.

Committee, we have agreed to consider Committee Report 30-19(2), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner. I'll go to the chair of that committee. Member for Yellowknife North.

Committee Report 30-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4535

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. The Information and Privacy Commissioner Committee Report was read into the record on Monday, May 30th, 2022. This is an annual report as both the Health Information Act and Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act require that the Information and Privacy Commissioner file an annual report.

I'd like to thank Mr. Andrew Fox, who appeared before committee on February 10th, 2022. He has stepped into that role after a long time Information and Privacy Commissioner, and he has done great work.

Committee has made a number of recommendations, which I will speak to, but I just wanted to point that I think this is truly a great committee report, and I encourage the Minister of Justice to review it and the GNWT to implement its recommendations.

The last legislature did a lot of great work, and we have one of the best ATIPP Acts in the country but it's become abundantly clear, as the number of complaints rise in this area, that implementation is really key to that act.

So individual Members may have comments on the report. I'd like to thank committee, Mr. Fox, and the department for their work in this area to date. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Report 30-19(2): Standing Committee on Social Development Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you, Member. I will now open the floor to general comments on Committee Report 30-19(2), Standing Committee of Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner.

Seeing that there are no further comments, Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories, in consultation with the Information and Privacy Commissioner, and by April 1, 2023, establish a government-wide policy that ensures all employees receive appropriate training on the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information. The policy should ensure that new employees receive training early on and all employees receive regular refreshers.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Committee, we're going to have to take a five minute recess. Sorry.

---SHORT RECESS

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

I now call Committee of the Whole back to order. Sorry, committee. We have the correct documents.

I will go to Mr. Johnson for the first motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Did I move it already, Madam Chair?

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Please read the motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories, in consultation with the Information and Privacy Commissioner, by April 1, 2023, establish a government-wide policy that ensures all employees receive appropriate training on the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information. The policy should ensure that new employees receive training early on and all employees receive regular refreshers.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. The printed copy I have did not have a back to the motion so I need to add some more words to the motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. Mr. Johnson, can you please reread the motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Madam Chair, for the third time, hopefully a charm, I MOVE that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories, in consultation with the Information and Privacy Commissioner, and by April 1, 2023, establish a government-wide policy that ensures all employees receive appropriate training on the collection, use, and disclosure of personal information. The policy should ensure that all new employees receive training early on and all employees receive regular refreshers;

And further, that the government emphasize Indigenous recruitment and retention to fill access and privacy positions.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4536

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. Previously, this committee has moved motions that ATIPP staff receive training, and I believe with the new centralization of the Access and Protection of Privacy office, a lot of that is being done. But it is clear that the number of breaches we're seeing are obviously not done by ATIPP officers. They're happening on the front lines with staff who deal with private information. And this motion recommends that the Information and Privacy Commissioner is more than willing to work with the department to provide training to those people to bring down the number of breaches.

Additionally, committee would like to emphasize that, you know, not many people grow up wanting to be an access and privacy officer but it is in dire need of people with expertise. So we encourage, you know, the youth to go get some training in access to privacy and to the department to, you know, use all of the Indigenous recruitment tools we have to make sure we fill these positions and, you know, have the capacity within territory. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. To the motion.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 249-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Employee Training on Collection, Use and Disclosure of Personal Information
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Department of Finance, in consultation with the Information and Privacy Commissioner, by April 1, 2023, update policies governing the use of mobile handheld devices by the public service, including:

1. The Mobile Handheld Devices Policy, to expand the policy provisions for proper use to address all the ways a user can collect, use, or disclose personal information with a device.

2. The employee code of conduct to introduce provisions to protect personal privacy regarding the use of government equipment and property; and.

3. New policy guidance to address the use of personal devices and email to conduct government business;

And further, that the Department of Finance should supplement these policies with easily accessible guidance documents on how devices should and should not be used.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. It's quite clear that all of our policies on personal devices and handheld devices are quite outdated, and this is both an access and a privacy issue. And I guess this needs to be a reminder to the public service that please do not conduct any personal business on work cell phones and computers, and certainly do not conduct any work business on personal devices. These lines should not be blurred. They make both -- yes, the amount of information, private information that cell phones can collect these days is truly remarkable, but it takes it outside of ATIPP and it has had privacy breaches in the past.

Additionally, there's been concerns with public servants using software that is not "ATIPP-able" and thus taking decision-making outside of the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act. So we encourage the government to take a look at all of these policies and make sure that we're using our devices properly. Thank you.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. To the motion.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 250-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Policies for Public Service Use of Handheld Mobile Devices, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4537

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide an update on its plan to reduce the use of faxing across the health and social services system, including:

  • Metrics on reductions in the use of faxing achieved so far;
  • The targets and associated timelines for future reductions; and
  • If faxing cannot or will not be eliminated, an explanation on why the use of fax cannot or will not be eliminated, and what measures the department is taking to mitigate the risk of data breaches arising from misaddressed documents.

Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. I've had the honour of moving a number of motions in this Assembly to eliminate fax machines, and they each get a little more specific as the department tries to make progress in this area.

And I want to clarify, this is not just some vendetta against outdated technology. The Information and Privacy Commissioner has consistently raised that, still to this date, a number of health breaches are arising from the use of fax machines. So I think the preference here is to completely get rid of them and perhaps the new electronic medical records will assist in that. But if we can't get rid of them, there clearly needs to be some increased guidelines in place so that we get no more health breaches through the use of fax. And I hope that these specific targeted metrics we're asking the Department of Health to implement will do that. Thank you.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. To the motion.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 251-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Faxing in Health and Social Services System, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those abstaining? Or all those opposed, I should say. All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide an update on complying with Section 72(1) of the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act, which requires the head of a public body to establish and publish categories of records to be made available to the public without a request for access;

AND FURTHER, the update should include a summary of the progress achieved so far and the timelines for full compliance at each public body. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. I'm very happy that the last Assembly in the Access to Information and Protection of Privacy Act put on an emphasis on proactive disclosure which requires every deputy minister to go look through past ATIPPs and look through their records and see what can be disclosed without an access request. A number of MLAs in this Assembly consistently ATIPPed the same documents and often they come back unredacted.

The scope of what is ATIPP-able and what is public is widely disconnected. So to date, departments have not complied with the act and complied with proactive disclosure of clarifying which records can be made public without an access request.

To date, the culture seems to be using ATIPP as a shield. ATIPP is not there to prevent information from coming out and used to, you know, drag on a process. ATIPP is there to direct departments to get that out before anyone needs to file a request. There's lots of guidance on how best to do this, and we encourage all departments and deputy ministers to comply with the act. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. To the motion.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 252-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Compliance with Section 72(2) of the ATIPPA, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4538

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Mr. Johnson.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Madam Chair, I move that this committee recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to this report within 120 days. Thank you, Madam Chair.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? All those abstaining?

---Carried

The motion is carried.

Thank you, committee. Do you agree that you have concluded consideration of Committee Report 30-19(2), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner?

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

The Chair Lesa Semmler

Thank you, committee. We've concluded consideration of Committee Report 30-1(2), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner.

Member for Frame Lake.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Mahsi, Madam Chair. I move that the chair rise and report progress. Thank you.

Committee Motion 253-19(2): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2020-2021 Annual Report of the Information and Privacy Commissioner - Government Response to Recommendations, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4539

The Chair Lesa Semmler

There's a motion on the floor to report progress. The motion is in order and non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried.

I will now rise and report progress.

---SHORT RECESS

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4539

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

May I please have the report of Committee of the Whole. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4539

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, your committee has been considering Committee Report 30-19(2) and Committee Report 31-19(2), and I would like to report with nine motions carried, and that Committee Report 30-19(2) and Committee Report 31-19(2) are concluded. And, Mr. Speaker, I move that the report of Committee of the Whole be concurred with. Thank you.

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4539

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Do we have a seconder? Member for Great Slave. All those in favour? All those opposed? Any abstentions?

---Carried

The motion is carried.

Third reading of bills. Minister responsible for Health and Social Services.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River North, that Bill 40, An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, be read for the third time. And Mr. Speaker, I request a recorded vote. Thank you.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Members, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely, and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining from third reading. Thank you.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4539

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

For.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

For.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Member for Yellowknife South.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Bill 40: An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, seven abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Bill 40 has had third reading.

Third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Nahendeh, that Bill 54, Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023 be read for the third time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely, and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining from the motion.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Member for Yellowknife South.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu. The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4540

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

For.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Member for Nahendeh.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Bill 54: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Bill 54 has had third reading.

Third reading of bills. Minister responsible for Finance.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, that Bill 55, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, be read for the third time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4541

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Madam Chair. I just want to let everyone know I will be voting against this infrastructure expenditure, Mr. Speaker. I think if you support building infrastructure in the Northwest Territories, then a supplementary appropriation which lapses $125 million is a very concerning sight. And I think if you believe that when the Assembly passes money and tells the GNWT to spend it and they don't, that's very concerning. And I know there's much debate about what exactly is being lapsed and will never come back versus what is being carried over and will probably make itself back on the project list in some sort of supplementary appropriation, but I want to give one tangible example.

This lapse is $1 million of deferred maintenance spending which the Department of Infrastructure didn't manage to spend, that will not be coming back. They have a fixed allocated budget for deferred maintenance and they didn't manage to spend $1 million of it this year despite our deferred maintenance backlog being $553, Mr. Speaker.

The department and the GNWT needs to get a plan in order that when we give them money for deferred maintenance, they spend it. And that's going to have to take some building capacity. It's going to have to take a lot of steps. But I think that is one particularly egregious example where I just can't support this infrastructure sups that takes $125 million out of our contractors in the North. And, you know, we said when we passed this budget, that it was the largest one in GNWT history. And well now with these lapses, that's no longer true, Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called.

Colleagues, pursuant to Rule 10.3(1), a recorded vote is required. The clerk shall call on each Member by riding name to cast their vote starting with the mover, those participating remotely, and those participating in the Chamber in the order of their seats. When the clerk calls on you, please state whether you are for, against, or abstaining from third reading.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife South.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Against.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Sahtu.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Range Lake.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

For.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River North.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

For.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Deh Cho.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Hay River South.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Kam Lake.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

For.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Frame Lake.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Against.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Yellowknife North.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Against.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Monfwi.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Jane Weyallon-Armstrong Monfwi

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Great Slave.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

In favour.

Bill 55: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4542

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: 14 in favour, three opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Bill 55 has had third reading.

Third reading of bills.

Mr. Clerk, can you please determine whether the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, the Honourable Margaret M. Thom, is prepared to enter the Chamber to assent to bills.

---SHORT RECESS

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

Page 4542

The Commissioner Of The Northwest Territories Margaret M. Thom

Mahsi, please be seated.

Good afternoon, Mr. Speaker. And Members of the Legislative Assembly, good afternoon.

[Translation] Thank you, I am honoured to be here again and I am very grateful. I know you guys work hard, and I thank you. For all the Northerners, I say thank you to you and hope that you guys work this hard for them, and I say thank you. [Translation ends].

I am again honoured to be in this special place with all of you. It is great to see all of you and to thank you for your hard work to better the lives of all Northerners.

With deep respect, I acknowledge and am very honoured to be here on Chief Drygeese traditional territory, the traditional home to the Yellowknives Dene and the North Slave Metis. I would like to further extend my respect to all Indigenous, Metis, and Inuit people who make the Northwest Territories their home. Mahsi.

We thank them for allowing us to live, work, and celebrate on their sacred land and for welcoming us as visitors.

As we enjoy these warmer months, I would like to wish each and every one of you a safe, healthy, and happy summer as you take your break, well-deserved break, and enjoy quality time with your families. Please travel safely on the land, on our waters, in the air, and on our highways, as you continue working for the betterment of all Northerners.

Encourage and remind your families, friends, and people in your communities to be safe out on the land and to wear personal floatation devices when travelling by boat on our waterways.

As this session comes to a close, I wish the Members of this House good health and happiness as you enjoy the summer and continue the work in your constituencies.

Now, as Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, I am pleased to assent to the following bills:

  • Bill 40, An Act to Amend the Medical Profession Act;
  • Bill 46, An Act to Amend the Motor Vehicles Act;
  • Bill 47, an Act to Amend the Employment Standards Act, No. 2;
  • Bill 54, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023;
  • Bill 55, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2022-2023.

Masi cho. Thank you. Quyananni. Merci beaucoup. Koana.

---SHORT RECESS

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

Page 4543

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Please be seated. Colleagues, before I adjourn, I know you all don't want to go leave us today here, but. Before I adjourn our sitting until October 13th, 2022, I would like to thank you for your productive sitting.

During this sitting, Members have passed five pieces of legislation, seven motions, and reviewed three committee reports. It was a short but business-filled sitting.

Please join me in thanking our interpreters for the important work they do making our proceedings available in our official languages.

---Applause

Colleagues, also join me in thanking the pages. It was a pleasure having them back in the Chamber. Hopefully some of them will be back one day as MLAs. Mahsi.

---Applause

Members, you have raised and discussed many different and important issues this session. It is fitting that you discuss issues related to systemic racism facing Indigenous people and violence against Indigenous women.

It was three years ago today that the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls presented their final report and the Calls to Justice. It is important that Members continue to raise awareness of these important issues.

June is National Indigenous History Month. We must remember and celebrate that in 1975, the Northwest Territories Council, as it was known then, was the first Legislative Assembly in Canada to have a majority of Indigenous Members, a tradition we have maintained along with our sister territory Nunavut.

The unique system of government we both share is not perfect but it reflects the Indigenous values of cooperation, respectful debate, and working together.

Many celebrations and assemblies lie ahead of us this summer. It will be the first time in two years where we can gather in large groups to celebrate National Indigenous Peoples Day, as well as our different assemblies.

Members, enjoy this opportunity to get out and celebrate with your constituents. Our summer is short but our days are long. I encourage you and all residents to enjoy the days ahead with family and friends, get out on the land, lakes, rivers, and oceans, that surround us. But please be safe and encourage your constituents to do the same.

While we look ahead to good times, we cannot forget those residents across the Northwest Territories who have been affected by flooding this spring. This will be a season of repairing and rebuilding. I know you will all continue to support these residents.

Thank you, Members. Mr. Clerk, orders of the day.

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

Page 4544

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Orders of the day for Thursday, October 13th, 1:30 p.m.

  1. Prayer
  2. Ministers' Statements
  3. Members' Statements
  4. Returns to Oral Questions
  5. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Oral Questions
  8. Written Questions
  9. Returns to Written Questions
  10. Replies to Commissioner's Address
  11. Petitions
  12. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills
  13. Reports of Standing and Special Committees
  14. Tabling of Documents
  15. Notices of Motions
  16. Motions
  17. Notices of Motion for First Reading of Bills
  18. First Reading of Bills
  19. Second Reading of Bills
  20. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
  • Bill 23, An Act to Amend the Public Utilities Act
  • Bill 29, Resource Royalty Information Disclosure Statute Amendment Act
  1. Report of Committee of the Whole
  2. Third Reading of Bills
  3. Orders of the Day

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

Page 4544

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. This House stands adjourned until Thursday, October 13th, 2022, at 1:30 p.m.

---ADJOURNMENT

The House adjourned at 2:45 p.m.