This is page numbers 5827 - 5874 of the Hansard for the 19th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was know.

Topics

Members Present

Hon. Diane Archie, Hon. Frederick Blake Jr., Mr. Bonnetrouge, Hon. Paulie Chinna, Ms. Cleveland, Hon. Caroline Cochrane, Mr. Edjericon, Hon. Julie Green, Mr. Jacobson, Mr. Johnson, Ms. Martselos, Ms. Nokleby, Mr. O'Reilly, Ms. Semmler, Mr. Rocky Simpson, Hon. Shane Thompson, Hon. Caroline Wawzonek, Ms. Weyallon Armstrong

The House met at 1:32 p.m.

---Prayer

Prayer
Prayer

Page 5827

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Ministers' statements. Honourable Premier.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, I want to acknowledge the recent addition of the Legislative Assembly's process convention related to the introduction, consideration, and enactment of bills under the Intergovernmental Council Legislative Development Protocol. Mr. Speaker, I do not often get to express appreciation for the work of the Legislative Assembly as led by you, Mr. Speaker, and supported by the Clerk and your staff. This new process convention is another example of the Northwest Territories leading the way in collaboration with Indigenous governments.

Devolution of lands and resources gave the Government of the Northwest Territories the opportunity to do things better. One of the commitments made was to work collaboratively in the development of land and resource legislation and policies through an Intergovernmental Council with Indigenous government partners. This was done to ensure that the interests of Indigenous peoples as they relate to lands and resources are well considered as this government undertakes its work and to encourage further collaboration and harmonization as Indigenous governments create their own laws respecting lands and resources through self-government.

In December of 2020 the Legislative Development Protocol was implemented to guide collaboration among the Executive branch of the GNWT and Indigenous governments in the development of lands and resources legislation. That protocol provides a consistent approach for the parties to follow, but it necessarily stopped short of directing what happens when a bill is developed and put forward to the Legislative Assembly. The work done by the Legislative Assembly and the Intergovernmental Council Secretariat to develop a process convention addressing legislation drafted in cooperation with the Intergovernmental Council is the first of its kind. It demonstrates the Northwest Territories leadership in working collaboratively with Indigenous governments.

Mr. Speaker, I look forward to this process convention being utilized so that when lands and resource legislation is put before this Legislative Assembly, MLAs have the benefit of hearing directly from Indigenous governments. As standing committees undertake their work and consider potential improvements to bills, Indigenous governments will be informed and may attend and participate in reviews. This is an example of reconciliation in action, and I wish to thank the Legislative Assembly for its support of our shared goal of advancing reconciliation. Good work, Mr. Speaker, and your team. Mashi cho.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Here, here.

Colleagues, before we continue, I'd like to recognize our Member of Parliament for the Northwest Territories, Mr. Michael McLeod, also former Member of the 15th and 16th Assembly and also Minister, here to announce more federal spending in the Northwest Territories. Don't forget your friends in the MacKenzie Delta. Welcome to the Chamber.

Ministers' statements. Minister of Finance.

Caroline Wawzonek

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, on January 16th, the Government of the Northwest Territories launched a new open data portal to provide a single point of access for existing GNWT data resources. This portal represents a significant step forward in our commitment to transparency and open government and it will be a valuable resource for residents, businesses, researchers, and anyone else interested in the data and information that shapes our communities and our economy. The open data portal provides easy access to a wide range of data including information on demographics, economy, environment, health, and many other topics. This data can be used to make informed decisions, spur innovation, and encourage economic growth.

Mr. Speaker, the Government of the Northwest Territories is committed to the principles of Open Government, demonstrated through efforts to increase openness, transparency, and accountability. Open Government is about providing timely, accurate information, and data to ensure the Northwest Territories residents are informed about government policies, activities, initiatives, spending and programs and services. It is about engaging with Northwest Territories residents so the government can take into account the concerns and views of the public in establishing priorities, developing policies, and implementing programs. Open Government also ensures that the GNWT is visible, accessible, and answerable to the people it serves.

Mr. Speaker, the GNWT has worked towards putting the principles of Open Government into action in the areas of open data, open information, and open dialogue since the establishment of the Open Government Policy in 2018. Launching the open data portal is the latest step we have taken as a government toward greater transparency and accountability. At launch, the portal included over 300 data sets from supply chain data to data on highway traffic and will be updated and expanded regularly. The next data sets expected to be launched in the portal are new and updated data from the Northwest Territories Bureau of Statistics such as Northwest Territories income data as well as Northwest Territories geospatial data such as mineral and land tenure information. This new data is expected to be launched in the portal in the first quarter of next fiscal year.

The Open Government steering committee will continue to promote the identification and release of additional data sets across government. By making our data easily accessible, we will empower our citizens and organizations to make better use of it and make more informed decisions that benefit the territory. I encourage all residents, businesses, and territorial organizations to familiarize themselves with the Open data portal and all that it offers. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for Infrastructure.

Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Mr. Speaker, in 2018, the Government of the Northwest Territories released the 2030 Energy Strategy - our roadmap to supporting secure, affordable, and sustainable energy in the NWT. Guided by the energy strategy, the Climate Change Strategic Framework and the GNWT's mandate, we are working to increase the use of alternative and renewable energy and reduce the territory's greenhouse gas emissions.

Mr. Speaker, as of 2020 the Northwest Territories greenhouse gas emissions were 19 percent below 2005 levels. The reduction target we have committed to is 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030, and we are on track to meet that target. However, we all know that much can and will change during the life of the energy strategy. Technologies improve, new ways of doing things emerge, new government policies cause shifts in how we produce and use energy. That is why the GNWT and its partners have always taken an adaptive approach to the strategy. This allows us to take advantage of new technologies and opportunities as they arise.

In December of last year, we released the 2022-2025 Energy Action Plan. The plan builds on the actions and initiatives of the previous plan and sets out what we plan to do over the next three years.

What we plan to do is ambitious. We are going to invest $194 million to implement 68 actions and initiatives that advance the six strategic objectives in the energy strategy. We expect this investment and the work outlined in the updated action plan will reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 51 kilotonnes by 2025. Guided by the action plan, the GNWT will also continue to explore and advance transformative projects such as the Fort Providence-Kakisa Transmission Line, a fast-charging corridor for electric vehicles stretching from Yellowknife to the Alberta border, and emerging low-carbon technologies like renewable diesel and hydrogen. This will lead to significant greenhouse gas emissions reductions and increase the use of alternative and renewable energy in the territory beyond 2025.

Mr. Speaker, the GNWT is about to start a review of the energy strategy. We committed to review it every five years so that it remains current and reflects what is realistic and achievable in the North. The GNWT has completed modeling work to better understand what options for a low-carbon future look like in the North. This work will be instrumental in the review of the energy strategy and will be used to evaluate and manage our progress. This review will also include extensive public engagement to understand where we can improve the energy actions and initiatives to better serve the people of the NWT. When it is completed, we will have the information needed to re-evaluate the strategy's strategic objectives to ensure they represent what is achievable, given both new technologies and the opportunities and realities of the North.

Mr. Speaker, this is challenging but necessary work. As we implement the updated energy action plan and review the 2030 Energy Strategy, the GNWT will evaluate the successes like our energy efficiency programs, biomass heating initiatives, assess where we can improve, and look for new opportunities to help us achieve the strategy's vision and support secure, affordable and sustainable energy in the Northwest Territories. Quyananni, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for Health and Social Services.

Julie Green

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to share information today about the voluntary supports available for Northwest Territories children, youth, and families through the health and social services system. There are several voluntary support services in place that are based on the prevention of negative outcomes. Community social workers are available to assist individuals and families in accessing them.

Through a voluntary support services agreement, children, youth, and their caregivers can receive help without parents giving up their legal rights and responsibilities for their child. Services and supports can include referrals for counselling, respite, parenting programs, alcohol and/or drug treatment, mental health services, and support to improve a family's financial situation. Voluntary support service agreements allow families to remain together through challenging situations.

Support services agreements are also available for youth between the ages of 16 and 18 who have no legal guardian able or available to support them. Through these agreements, youth can get assistance with education, room and board, counselling, respite, young parenting programs, alcohol and/or drug treatment, and mental health. The goal is to help the young person to live independently and achieve their goals as they transition into adulthood. For young adults aging out of the permanent custody of the director of child and family services when they turn 19, extended support services agreements are available until they reach 23 years of age. These agreements meet the needs of the young adult on a case-by-case basis.

Mr. Speaker, the health and social service authorities also deliver the Healthy Families and the Family Preservation programs.

The Healthy Families Program is culture-based and provides parents with skills and community engagement to ensure they have the tools and knowledge to help their children thrive. The program is open to all families with children prenatal to six years of age. They can either refer themselves or be referred by a professional. All engagement is voluntary. The Healthy Family Program is offered in most NWT communities.

The Family Preservation Program provides supports to families with complex needs so that children can remain within their family, community, and culture. The goal of this program is to preserve the family unit and give parents, children, and others the tools they need to be successful. These services are available to families with children up to 23 years of age. Youth up to the age of 23 can also access these services themselves. Again, this program is voluntary and referral-based.

Mr. Speaker, we understand the impact and trauma from the legacy of child and family services. We are working to reduce barriers and ensure that these services are provided in a culturally safe and respectful manner. We are committed to safeguarding the well-being and connection of all children and youth to their families, cultures, and communities. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Colleagues, before we continue, I'd like to recognize Grand Chief of the Tlicho government Mr. Jackson Lafferty, also former Speaker, Minister, and Member of the 15th, 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th Assemblies. Welcome. Welcome back. Please behave up there now, Boys.

Members' statements. Member for Thebacha.

Frieda Martselos

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, yesterday as Caucus chair, I pleased to table a consensus government convention that clarifies how this Assembly will consider and pass land and resource legislation that has been in partnership with Indigenous governments in the NWT.

Mr. Speaker, before becoming an MLA, I served for 14 years as chief of the Salt River First Nation. I was at a table with Premier McLeod and other northern leaders when the devolution agreement was signed and negotiated. It was a hard-fought negotiation.

I want to be very clear that devolution was never intended to transfer the authority for lands and resources to the Government of the Northwest Territories. I and other Indigenous leaders who negotiated the deal viewed it, and continue to view it, as the proper resumption of control over northern lands and resources by Northerners, all Northerners.

Mr. Speaker, in the last Assembly, the Intergovernmental Council, including the Government of the Northwest Territories, cooperated on the drafting of the Mineral Resources Act. It wasn't easy, and there was a lot of give and take. Once the bill was introduced, however, it was amended by the Assembly with little to no input from Indigenous governments who helped draft it. That was unfortunate, Mr. Speaker. It was a step back for reconciliation when we were badly in need of a giant step forward.

Mr. Speaker, the process convention I tabled yesterday will help ensure that this does not happen again. It recognizes that while this Assembly has the exclusive jurisdiction to make public laws in the NWT, it does not and should not do so in a vacuum. Indigenous governments are not stakeholders in land and resource legislation. They are the primary stewards, owners, and knowledge-keepers of our northern land and resources. Starting with the Forest Act that was introduced this week, Indigenous governments will not be included in all discussions between the Minister and standing committees on land and resource bills and will have an opportunity to state their views directly to the committee. The convention adds additional time to the standing committee review process and ensures that Indigenous governments will have time to consider and express their views directly to the committee on proposed amendments to these bills. IGC representatives will be invited to this Chamber as full witnesses during the Committee of the Whole review of land and resources bills and, importantly, on to the floor along with all 19 of us when the Commissioner gives assent to these bills and brings them into law. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Mr. Speaker, this protocol is a first of its kind in Canada. For many Canadians, reconciliation is a distant abstract aspiration. However, here in the NWT, and in this Chamber, reconciliation is infused in everything we do. In the NWT, we're on the frontlines of reconciliation and must break a trail for the rest of Canada to follow. This protocol demonstrates that consensus government can adapt to reflect the wonderfully complex political environment in the NWT.

I want to thank and congratulate all my colleagues for taking this bold step forward. This is what leadership looks like, and I am proud to have my signature on this important step toward greater reconciliation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Thebacha. Members' statements. Member for Frame Lake.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Sometimes we get so caught up in our day-to-day activities in this House that we miss when something really special or historic happens. Yesterday a new process convention was tabled in this House on how we review resource management legislation. This represents a fundamental and seismic change in how our Legislative Assembly works when it comes to legislation co-drafted pursuant to the devolution agreement of 2014 and the Intergovernmental Council Legislative Development Protocol. I predict that this new collaborative approach will eventually be extended to other areas of shared jurisdiction and interest between Northwest Territories Indigenous governments and the Government of the Northwest Territories such as education and social services.

This new arrangement between Regular MLAs and Cabinet stems from lessons learned during the co-development and review of resource management legislation in the last Assembly. Standing committee would hear concerns and issues from the public and Indigenous governments, sometimes resulting in amendments. Indigenous governments were surprised when amendments were proposed and made to some of those laws without their input. This process convention will extend the review period for new resource management legislation and provides for increased sharing of information between standing committee and the Intergovernmental Council during the review of a bill. Indigenous governments will also be able to attend meetings on bills and appear on the floor of this House. I am not aware of any other jurisdiction in Canada that has this type of arrangement, and I believe it sets a useful and needed precedent. We will test drive this new process with Bill 74, Forest Act.

While this new historic arrangement builds on what we learned in the last Assembly with resource management legislation, there is still more work to be done. We need to find better ways to share information and engage those Indigenous governments that are not part of the Intergovernmental Council. There are still problems with the consistency, timing, and amount of information shared with standing committee by Cabinet on the co-drafting of resource management legislation.

Lastly, I continue to be profoundly disappointed with the failure of Cabinet to apply its own Open Government policy in the development of new resource management legislation and regulations. GNWT needs to step up and ensure there is a parallel process for the public in the development of this new legislation and a clear role for the public in decision-making. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Merci, Monsieur le President. GNWT needs to step up and ensure there is a parallel process for the public in the development of this new resource management legislation and a clear role for the public in decision-making. This is what our residents have come to expect from responsible resource development and co-management itself.

I would be remiss, Mr. Speaker, if I did not acknowledge and thank our Clerk and the staff of the Intergovernmental Council for their hard work in helping us reach this new process convention. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Members' statements. Member for Hay River South.

Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Blue skies and warmer weather. Mr. Speaker, it is the time of year for events meant to welcome warmer weather. Last weekend it was K'amba Carnival. Now in Hay River, on the 17th to the 19th is now time for Polar Pond Hockey.

Mr. Speaker, to bring this event together requires a lot of work from a lot of dedicated volunteers, along with sponsorships from a great number of local businesses. It means clearing massive amounts of snow off the river down by Fishermen's Wharf, then it is on to laying out ten rinks and preparing them for flooding. As all that is happening, a setup crew is installing Big Blue, which is a covered structure where food and beverages can be had while warming up between games. In the evening, Big Blue is a venue for live bands to entertain all into the early morning hours.

Mr. Speaker, the event draws teams from throughout the NWT, Alberta, and Nunavut. There are three divisions which include ladies, open, and seniors. Playing hockey in this event is not only competitive and fun but for those of us who knew nothing else but outdoor rinks when we were young, a long time ago, taking part in this event for, but a moment, brings us back to the time of our youth and the pure fun of hockey on an outdoor rink. Mr. Speaker, I welcome all of you to Hay River to either take part in the event, cheer on friends and family, or just enjoy the festivities. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Members' statements. Member for Deh Cho.

Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have spoken several times of my concerns with the Alberta tailings ponds and the toxic sludge contained within them. Tailings ponds are manmade open reservoirs, the size of lakes, that hold toxic waste from the oil extraction, and they contain arsenic, dissolved heavy metals and hydrocarbons. These tailings ponds are large enough to be seen from space and are some of the biggest human made structures on earth.

Mr. Speaker, many First Nations downstream from the Alberta tar sands tailings ponds have expressed time and time their concerns with the tailing ponds breaching their dikes.

Unbeknownst to any First Nations, nor the Government of the Northwest Territories, this is exactly what occurred in May 2022. This government only found out last week, and the information did not come from the Alberta government nor the Alberta premier. This information came from the affected First Nations near the tar sands tailings ponds in Alberta.

Mr. Speaker, there's a story in the Edmonton Journal newspaper dated March 6th, 2023, in which the Alberta premier states not only her concern with the spill but to also state that Alberta had no obligation to notify the Government of the Northwest Territories of the spill.

Mr. Speaker, this is preposterous. In this day and age of supposed collaboration between the governments of the province and the territory, and the territory gets the rotten egg. Mr. Speaker, I will have questions not for the Minister of MACA, not for the Minister of ENR, not for the Minister of Lands, but for the Premier of the Northwest Territories and how she will stand up and defend our most precious resource - the water. Mahsi.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Deh Cho. Members' statements. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, public lands in the NWT is something that we all enjoy and have access to as Northerners and Canadians. We use these lands for a variety of reasons like recreation, travel, and often to just get closer to nature. These public lands are something that we all cherish. Public lands in my riding, and as well as my colleagues' ridings, are deeply connected to the culture of Indigenous people of the North. In fact, Mr. Speaker, in my riding there are two land claim agreements in place; three if you include the transboundary nature of the Sahtu, Gwich'in, and the Inuvialuit agreements.

Mr. Speaker, in these agreements, it speaks to members of these agreements being able to access public lands in their respective areas for the purpose of harvesting. Part of these harvesting rights include the right to establish camps for the purpose of harvesting. In the case of the Inuvialuit, for example, that agreement says that beneficiaries should not be charged fees for exercising their rights like the establishment of camps under these leases. Mr. Speaker, I've had concerns raised to me by numerous people that they are being charged fees to exercise their right in the way of lease payments. In some cases, people have asked to surrender their lease and want to fall under rights-based rights designation. These leaseholders are told they need to remove everything from the land and inspect and done before they can surrender their lease even though these may be rights-based camps and passed through generations, Mr. Speaker. In other instances, some people have been threatened to be taken to court or collections for nonpayment. And in another case, full fees have been charged even though the land, or most of it, is gone because it eroded away by the mighty Mackenzie River, Mr. Speaker, and the structure was moved before they even received the bill. Mr. Speaker, today I will have questions for the Minister of Lands and why his department is charging fees to Indigenous people to exercise their right to establish camps and if those fees go against the land claim agreements that we as GNWT are party to, Mr. Speaker. I will also be asking the Minister to commit today to pausing all current Indigenous lease fees and collection actions under a more detailed review can be done on this issue. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Members' statements. Member for Monfwi.

Jane Weyallon Armstrong

Jane Weyallon Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it is with great pleasure I would like to recognize the efforts from our Tlicho youth who are working to host the second Idaa Ts'ade Youth Gathering with a big focus on the wellness and Tlicho way of life. This event is a youth-led initiative for Tlicho youth ages 16 to 35 years old living in Canada. Young people have decided to gather again to share ideas, learn new information, engage in traditional activities, and network with various people and organizations. I applaud these young people for recognizing the need to come together to deal and address social issues young people face every day of their young life.

This is a challenge. In many cases, it prohibits young people from moving forward. The need to come together is rewarding. It will help with healing and begin a new journey for the next generations.

The Idaa Ts'ade Gathering will be held on March 20th to 24th, 2023, at Chief Jimmy Bruneau School in Edzo. They are anticipating about 150 youth to be present at this event. Therefore, I want to send my appreciation to this wonderful youth-led project, led by Antonia Dryneck-Black, Janelle Nitsiza, and Jodie Zoe, and their committee members for their commitment to work with the youth. And I would also like to acknowledge the committee members Tiana Steinwand, Lydia Rabesca, Jocelle Zoe, Michelle Zoe, Justine Sarasin, Edie Erasmus, Francis Sheft, Stephanie Rabesca, Debbie Simpson, Belinda Blackduck, Antoine Scott-Ennis, Shania Clarke, and Mercedes Rabesca. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. Members' statements. Member for Nunakput.

Jackie Jacobson

Jackie Jacobson Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, yesterday I spoke in the House about impacts on carbon tax. Carbon tax is going to increase the cost of living in the Northwest Territories, Mr. Speaker, in my riding by 17 percent on heating fuel, and every year after is four cents added on to that. Mr. Speaker, how are we going to tax people when we're already stretched to the limit to put food on the table and have nothing to give? Why are the people who are living in the highest Arctic communities, who are most impacted by climate change, having to pay climate change tax? On top of all this, now we have to pay more. Already we pay more, two cents a litre on heating fuel, which is about $2.24 a litre for heating fuel in the community already, and it's going to get stretched, impacted, more impact to the people, more impact to private homeowners. Families could barely afford to buy food, Mr. Speaker, in the highest food prices across the food index in the NWT. Over 50 percent Nunakput residents are worried about having enough money to pay for food to put on the table for their families, Mr. Speaker. Why we have to hunt to put food on table. It's not only our culture, it's a way of life. Hunting alleviates the pressure on putting expensive food on the table when we -- subsistence hunters. Price food bills, but it's so expensive the cost of gas. It's dangerous on changing climate. Our power bills in the communities continue to go up as well. We pay some of the highest rates in the power. In Sachs Harbour, it's $2.20 a kilowatt. And the housing the government provides our people through public housing are paper-thin walls, cracks in the doors, walls that bring snow right through our homes, floors that have to have blankets put down to save energy and to keep their feet warm in the unit.

Mr. Speaker, people in my riding have very little employment opportunities. Nunakput families earn an average $50,000 less than the NWT family. It's almost 20 percent of income assistance; 10 percent of families make less than $30,000. There's an offshore moratorium and on shore resource development dragging on. There's no way out to get ahead, Mr. Speaker. There's no way to pay the bills the residents already have now that they're going to be taxed more.

Mr. Speaker, I oppose Bill 60. I want to kill that bill. It's pretty simple. Can't tax people who have nothing to give. Over the next two weeks, I encourage everyone in the communities to rally against, talk to their MLAs, and encourage them to talk to their MLAs in regards to Bill 60 and why are they going to support to it if they're going to support it, and please don't support Bill 60. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nunakput. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I stand before you to remind this government the dark chapter in Canadian history of the devastating issue of child abuse and genocide that took place in Canada's day school system. This systematic culture devastation committed against Indigenous people in our country for far too long. It is time for us to acknowledge the damages done and make amends to the atrocities committed.

Our government is not innocent in this matter. The federal Indian day school and the Indian federal day school were transferred to the GNWT on April 1st, 1969, and the territorial government continued these programs until April 1st, 1996, for 27 years under the GNWT system, and the abuse continued throughout the NWT, including in the Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh riding of N'dilo, Dettah, Lutselk'e, and Fort Resolution.

The discovery of the remains of hundreds of Indigenous children at a residential school across Canada is a stark reminder of the horrors that these children and their families suffered. The scars of this traumatic experience still run deep. It is time for us to take action to help those affected to heal and move forward. The Government of the Northwest Territories must step up and advocate for the victims of the day school system. It is their responsibility to ensure that the Indigenous children and their families receive compensation from the federal government in resources for the abuse and harm they have endured after April 1st, 1969 to 1996.

We must stand together as a nation and work together in healing and reconciliation for all Indigenous people. We need to ensure that all Indigenous people receive the care and support and resources needed to heal and recover from this. We cannot allow survivors and their families to suffer in silence and must do everything in our power to support them. The Government of the Northwest Territories must take the lead in advocating for the victims of the day school system after April 1st, 1969 to April 1st, 1996 and ensure that they receive the compensation they deserve similar to the federal day school compensation prior to 1969. Together we can work together at a brighter future for all Indigenous people in Canada. Let's stand together and make a difference for the survivors and their families. I would have questions for the Premier, Caroline Cochrane, at the appropriate time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Members' statements. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, my riding is unique in Yellowknife in that it consists mainly of residential homes and apartment buildings with a few exceptions. There is the Catholic Church and the City of Yellowknife's water treatment plant as well as the NWT Geological Survey, Taiga lab, and Con Mine. And Mr. Speaker, there is one school, Sir John Franklin High School.

Sir John was first constructed in the 1960s with additional phases added and renovations carried out over the years. The building is also home to the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, or NACC, one of the few theatrical arts spaces in our capital.

While operated by the Yellowknife School Board YK1, Sir John is unique as the board does not own the asset. Rather, Mr. Speaker, YK1 maintains and operates the school under agreements with the GNWT. This is likely due to the school being on the site of the former Akaitcho Hall residential school, further complicating issues.

When insurance costs escalated during the pandemic, an MOU was signed between the school boards and ECE for the GNWT to insure the schools, easing some of their financial burden. In return, the boards agreed to maintain the schools to GNWT standards. However, these standards are more stringent than their previous level of maintenance and it is costing them money. Since 2019 there has been a 30 to 40 percent increase in material costs to maintain the operations of YK1's buildings. Sir John has a chronic leaking pipe that became an emergency around Christmas and YK1 was left scrambling to find funds to pay for the patch job.

Mr. Speaker, $1 million in maintenance is required for this leaking pipe alone. Who is going to pay for that? Will YK1 have to take it out of their programming budget to fix this issue in a building they don't even own? Additionally, $100,000 in upgrades is required for Sir John's internal phone system, a safety issue when inoperable. But there aren't any funds to pay for this either. In total, YK1 needs $1.4 million for the maintenance of their schools. The ECE Minister said he would investigate this pre-COVID but nothing has been done.

Mr. Speaker, we need to support our schools and ensure that all children in the NWT have safe spaces in which to learn and play. It is their right, and I hope that the department will help out our school boards with their ongoing maintenance woes. If left on their own, programs will be cut, and children will suffer. And Mr. Speaker, NWT children deserve better than that. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Canadians en masse are working to access health care. They are waiting for elective surgeries, access to specialists, testing and treatment requirements of cancers, chronic disease, and STIs, and a surge in addiction and mental health support needs. In addition, special treatment programs like audiology, speech pathology, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy appointments put off over the pandemic further bottleneck our already fragile system. The catchup, Mr. Speaker, will take years, and some national experts speculate that the Canadian health care system may never catch up under its status quo approach. Today, to help alleviate the pressures of our health care system, many Canadian jurisdictions expanded the scope of practice to pharmacists. And I say many, Mr. Speaker, not all, because it is all except the NWT and Nunavut.

This term brought minor amendments to the Pharmacy Act and a promise of more ambitious legislation, but with five sitting days left in this month I am doubtful that I will see this promise realized.

Mr. Speaker, I want to talk about three examples of what this really means. Pharmacists can't prescribe medications for simple things like smoking cessation, minor ailments or conditions like chronic UTIs, or adapt a prescription to suit the needs and reactions of a patient. From flu shots to routine immunizations and travel vaccines, pharmacies can't offer convenient access to injections. NWT pharmacists have no injection authority. Beyond flu vaccines and COVID vaccines, a pharmacist can't even administer the medications they have handed to a patient. This means taking their medication, booking an appointment with primary care, and then having their medication injected by a nurse or physician, further straining our system. Patients can't work with pharmacists to sort out medication amounts or source alternatives.

An example of this is a Parkinson's patient who worked for two years to stabilize their medication. The current system forced a harmful back and forth between a taxed locum reliant system with zero continuity of care rather than empowering managing prescriptions with the pharmacist.

Mr. Speaker, this also causes a barrier to Indigenous residents covered by NHIB for things that should be easily accessible, like birth control, Tylenol, and diabetes devices like glucose test strips. With the current Act, residents need to request a prescription from a doctor and then go see a pharmacist to source these items. Canada's pharmacists are doing more for their patients than ever before, but they continue to be an underutilized health care resource in the Northwest Territories. When they can't practice to their full scope, Mr. Speaker, it means that patients aren't receiving the best possible care and the system can't work to its full potential. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Rylund Johnson

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This weekend is my least favourite day of the year, Mr. Speaker. And that's the day the clocks go forward. And, Mr. Speaker, it's not just me who hates the time change. Every single year the day after the time change there's a spike in car accidents, Mr. Speaker. People hate the time change so much they are crashing their cars in protest.

Mr. Speaker, the day after time change, the economy loses millions of dollars in economic productivity, and the Monday following time change is the Number 1 sick day consistently in the GNWT, Mr. Speaker. People awake and, in protest of the time change, they phone in sick to their public service job which they love, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, we recently went out and we surveyed whether to get rid of the time change, and it was the single biggest response the GNWT has ever gotten in a survey. 3,545 people responded. Mr. Speaker, that broke the previous record on the cannabis survey. The people have spoken. They hate the time change more than they love cannabis, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, 87 percent of respondents said they were in favour of getting rid of the time change. 87 percent, Mr. Speaker. What clearer direction do we need from our people?

Mr. Speaker, all too frequently we go out and we produce these "what we heard" reports, and they become "what we did not listen to" reports. Mr. Speaker, the Minister of time is not here today so I will have questions for the Premier whether she will listen to the people of the Northwest Territories, and this can be the last time change once and for all, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, today I'd like to share with you a success story from the Nahendeh riding. 18 years ago, the business arm of the Acho Dene Koe First Nation, Fort Simpson Metis Nation, Nahanni Butte Dene Band, and Sambaa K'e First Nation came together to form Dehcho Regional Helicopters. The core of a business plan was to secure, with their operating partner Great Slave Helicopters, the contract for the helicopter services that supported the Fort Simpson fire base. It is a source of pride for the Dehcho Regional Helicopters Limited partners that every summer, since its founding, the company has played a part in managing wildfires and protecting the communities and cabins of their members from these fires.

In 2008, the company acquired its first helicopter, an ASTAR 350 B2, which its call sign was DCV. That helicopter has been dedicated to forestry contracts based out of Fort Simpson each summer.

In 2010, the partnership extended to include the economic arms of the Liidlii Kue First Nation and Pehdzeh Ki First Nation. The expansion united all seven First Nation and Metis Nations in the Nahendeh region in the business. Their business model and their commitment to each of the seven limited partners have contributed to this company's success.

This past spring, Dehcho Regional Helicopters acquired a second helicopter, an ASTAR 350 B3, named after the company with the call sign DRH, a helicopter which you might have noticed flying around the city because it's bright orange, has already worked at Diavik during drill moves outside of Yellowknife this past summer supporting fire crews in the mining sector in Saskatchewan.

As the only 100 percent Indigenous-owned helicopter company in the territory, Dehcho Regional Helicopters and its limited partners are committed to increasing Indigenous participation in leadership in the aviation industry. The company offered three different types of scholarships each year. In 2020, and again in 2021, the company was pleased to award $30,000 to fixed-wing or helicopter pilot scholarships to two students from Fort Simpson who were studying aviation management program at Sub-Arctic Leadership Training College in Fort Smith.

Dehcho Regional Helicopters, which is looking forward to celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2024, as an Indigenous business success story. Please join me in congratulating them. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nahendeh. Members' statements. Returns to oral questions. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

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Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to wish Lillian Elias Happy Birthday today. She's our language interpreter. It's her 80th birthday. Quyananni for all your hard work that you do here. I'd also like to recognize MP McLeod and Grand Chief Lafferty who's joining me this afternoon to do a big announcement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Boot Lake. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

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Julie Green

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to thank Brad Enge for coming to the Legislative Assembly today to observe our proceedings. And I'd like to say hello to a longtime friend Kelly Ryder who is here as well. Thank you.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife Centre. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nunakput.

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Jackie Jacobson

Jackie Jacobson Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today I'd like to welcome Lieutenant Colonel Kris Udesen, commanding officer of First Canadian Ranger Patrol Group out of here, out of Yellowknife. I want to welcome him to the House and thank him for his service. And I want to welcome former colleagues of ours here in the House, Mr. Speaker. I really miss them. Jackson Lafferty, grand chief, thank you for coming to the House. It's always good to see you. And our former colleague Mike McLeod MP and thank him for all what you guys are doing for the people. And keep up the good work.

And also, Mr. Speaker, I'd like to welcome Sholto Douglas in the House as well, from Fort Smith. Sholto is one of the most knowledgeable dog guys I know and the biggest volunteer for NWT dog sledding where he travels around and helps us in the Delta for timing and being race marshals and stuff like that, for the community, for the communities across the North, you know.

Mr. Speaker, also I really want to welcome to the House one of my closest friends for over 20 years, Mr. Curtis Earhart from Alaska. Curtis came, one of our friends got in a car accident, Mr. Speaker, Brent Beck, and he had nobody to care for his dogs. And Curtis drove 28 hours from Fairbanks, Alaska, on his own dime, to come and help Brent run, train, and for keeping upkeep of his dogs. And Curtis went above and beyond, you know, for that, doing not only training now, then they got on the race circuit. So he went to Minnetonka, Minnesota, and they've been travelling around and doing the southern South Slave dog races. And I just really want to, you know, thank Curtis for what he's done for Brent. And he'd do that for anybody; I know that. And I just want to thank him for what he's done and just let it be known that, you know, it's not going unseen and we thank him. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nunakput. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

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Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize Michael McLeod, our MP from the Northwest Territories. I'd like to say welcome. Also I'd like to welcome Jackson Lafferty, the grand chief of the Tlicho region. Mahsi for being here. Also I want to recognize Brad Enge; I think he's in the back. And also, I'd like to recognize Sholto Douglas, and thank you for being here. And also, I want to say thank you to, again, all the translators out of here as well, including Mary Rose Sundberg, Jonas Lafferty, Tommy Unka, Marg Casaway, and our friends who have a Happy Birthday to them. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Deh Cho.

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Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize the Member of Parliament, Mr. Michael McLeod, and welcome him to the House. But this House is my House so he's actually a constituent, Mr. Speaker. And I'd also like to welcome back former colleague, Mr. Jackson Lafferty, who is now the grand chief of the Tlicho Nation. I'd like to congratulate him on that venture and hope him success in many fronts. And I'd also like to recognize Sholto Douglas who is the vice-president of the NWT Sled Dog Sports. I wasn't sure he was a vice-president because he always says he's the boss, so I don't know about that then. I'd also like to recognize Curtis Earhart. My colleague recognized him and advised where he was from and that he is racing with Brent Beck Racing Team. And this weekend too, Fort Smith is hosting a sled dog racing weekend to their carnival. They have one of the largest pools around. And we got ten-dog racing teams and an equal number, if not more, for the six-dog racing, so I wish them well, good luck this weekend in Fort Smith. Mahsi.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Deh Cho. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

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Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. While I'm happy to see all our illustrious people in the gallery, I want to recognize my page Chelsea Sieban who has been here for a couple weeks now, and I just say that after our time in COVID, when we didn't have the pages, it's really great to have them. And this group particularly seems to be really on top of the water glass filling. So thank you very much for that. And Happy Birthday to Lillian. Take care.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Hay River South.

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Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Seems like we're at a navy meeting here or something. I'd like to recognize Brad Enge; Michael McLeod, our MP; Mr. Sholto Douglas; and Mr. Jackson Lafferty, grand chief. Welcome. Welcome back home. Thank you.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Thebacha.

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Frieda Martselos

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize our MP for coming to visit us in this House, and welcome back to Fort Smith any time he wants, because that's where he went to school in the early years. I used to serve him on the line. I also want to welcome Jackson. I congratulate him on his grand chief appointment by all his people. That's a big achievement. And I want to recognize Brad who used to -- is a former Fort Smith resident. And of course Sholto, for all his volunteer work, not only with the dog mushers but Sholto is a great caterer and does incredible meals for the community at many community events. And I want to thank him for that. Thank you, Sholto.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Thebacha. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Honourable Premier.

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Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also want to recognize our MP Michael McLeod and grand chief Lafferty, two powerful leaders who are strong advocates for the people in the Northwest Territories and I appreciate all the efforts that you do for us. I also want to recognize Brad Enge who is a long-time personal family friend. He's probably -- I think you're older than I am.

And of course I want to recognize Range Lake page Morgan Miller. These are not only important to have in the Legislative Assembly, I'm hoping that many of these pages will become future leaders and carry on the work that we're doing today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nahendeh.

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Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to recognize one of the interpreters Mary Jane Cazon, a resident from Fort Simpson. She does a great job, and I thank her for that.

I guess I'm going to jump on the bandwagon here and recognize Michael McLeod, former boss. He was my Minister way back when, so I thank him. I consider him a friend, mentor, and a sounding board in the work that we do for residents of the Northwest Territories. As well to Jackson Lafferty, a friend, mentor, colleague, sounding board, and now he's the grand chief. So welcome to our Assembly. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nahendeh. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Monfwi.

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Jane Weyallon Armstrong

Jane Weyallon Armstrong Monfwi

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to also acknowledge and recognize our Tlicho grand chief, Jackson Lafferty in the audience. I am happy he moved on to be our grand chief, and I am grateful to be part of this 19th Legislative Assembly. So I am grateful he's -- he is our grand chief. And I would also like to recognize Michael McLeod in the audience and Sholto Douglas who is originally from Behchoko. So I would like to acknowledge and welcome Sholto Douglas as well. Thank you.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Monfwi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Sahtu.

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Paulie Chinna

Paulie Chinna Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I also would like to welcome MP McLeod as well and Tlicho grand chief Jackson Lafferty. And I'd also like to recognize the Sahtu interpreters as well, Sarah Cleary and Theresa Etchinelle. And also the pages from the Sahtu as well, Colby Campbell Modeste and Aidan Widow. Thank you for all your work this week as well too. And also Happy Birthday to Lillian Elias and hello to Sholto Douglas. Mahsi.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Sahtu. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Frame Lake.

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Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I think we actually have a rule that we're not only supposed to acknowledge folks that are in our riding but, and I'm not going to pile it on just this one time I will follow the rules, but I acknowledge there's lots of friends in the House today.

I do want to recognize a page, Jaida Deutschmann. I haven't met Jaida, but I think I know her mom and dad. They're great vegetable growers; they've got a greenhouse and so on. And I really appreciate the work that all the pages do for us in this House. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Once again, welcome, Mr. Lafferty, grand chief, former Member. And also Michael McLeod. I'd just like to actually -- you know, colleagues, a lot of times we don't get a chance to thank people until it's too late. But a lot of people don't know, but 12 years ago in August, Michael and also R.C. McLeod encouraged me to run before the 17th Assembly there. And, you know, the jury's still out on that one -- no, I'm just kidding. But I'd just like to thank him and also Robert McLeod. But that wouldn't have happened without my constituents. But, you know, it meant a lot to have those encouraging words. And, you know, a lot of we might not have the confidence to, you know, take on a role such as this but, you know, with encouraging words and also the support of our constituents, we could do anything. And I'd just like to take the time to thank both of them. Also Jackson, I had a lot of fun in the 17th and 18th Assemblies with him, and also part of the 19th. But I'd just like to wish you all well in your leadership endeavors and keep up the good work.

Also if we've missed anyone in the gallery today, welcome to the Chamber and I hope you're enjoying the proceedings. It is always nice to see people in the gallery. Mahsi.

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Acknowledgements. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Rylund Johnson

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Is the Premier going to listen to the people of the Northwest Territories and get rid of the time change?

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Honourable Premier.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I do know that it's with the Department of Justice. I know that the Minister is looking into this. There was a survey done. There was a lot of comments. I think that the Member is right; it's important we listen to the people. I also heard the MLA -- one MLA say that he doesn't agree with it, so I hear that. I do think that it's an important question, and I do know that the Minister is looking into it right at this point. I have my own personal opinions but I'm here to support the GNWT, and I will support the Minister. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North. (audio)

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I know the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources just got off an interesting phone call with the Alberta environment Minister, and I'm just wondering if he might be able to provide an update to the House on that conversation? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. Minister responsible for Environment and Natural Resources.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I did take some notes from that meeting so I'm just going to read them here.

Mr. Speaker, we spoke about the importance of sharing water -- our shared water to the NWT residents and the communities. We talked about some of the concerns that residents in the communities have downstream of the oil sands. We spoke about the importance of honouring the commitment of the Bilateral Water Management Agreement. We also spoke about the critical importance of being notified about development that might affect the ecological integrity of our water share. And we spoke about the importance of transparency, information sharing, and the continued need for robust monitoring that is essential for building public trust. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that, keeping notes and giving us the update. I'm just wondering if he can tell us whether there was any acknowledgement of noncompliance with the transboundary water agreement or an apology? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I can advise you that the Alberta Minister recognized that there was a failure to communicate on the issue. There was a lot of finger pointing through this whole process and I can tell you she just found out this February. So she was similar into the same boat as us there. We talked about working together to improve how we implement the transboundary agreement. Again, it's about the wording and that so we've made that commitment to do that. And we've also committed to have a face-to-face meeting sometime in April, whether it's the 13th or 18th. We're just working on that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that. I think it was yesterday -- maybe it was the day before, I raised the issue of, you know, public engagement on the development of any new tailings discharge regulations, how we've hired consultants, they give us reports, all of that is secret. We don't know what's being said behind closed doors. I know that's a trigger word but I'm just wondering, Mr. Speaker, if this issue of public engagement and the development of these discharge regulations was raised with the Minister in Alberta during the call? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I took the heat from the Members on the other side during their business plan and that, and I did bring it forth to raise the concerns with her about the House that development regulations for the release of oil sand tailings need to be transparent and public, and we need to be engaged moving forward. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Final supplementary. Member for Frame Lake.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the Minister for that. I'm just wondering if he can tell us if there's any real concrete outcomes? I understand he's going to meet with the Minister face-to-face in April. That's a good thing. But, you know, did he secure a commitment from the Minister in Alberta that there would be public engagement in the development of these tailings discharge regulations? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the first thing is we made the commitment to do the face-to-face meeting. That's the important part of it. She has also committed to sharing information on the seepage and spills moving forward. So we'll make sure we have a robust process in getting that information to us. They also agreed that the dispute resolution provision of our bilateral agreement is the right tool to resolve the matter and set a plan to avoid this kind of incident in the future so we're doing dispute mechanism. She has agreed to that. She's looking forward to enhancing the transboundary agreement. She sees some hiccups there that we have addressed and that we're moving forward on that. So she's made a commitment. I'm looking forward to meeting with her in April. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Deh Cho.

Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are related to my Member's statement on the recent findings of a tailings pond breech at the Alberta tar sands projects. This may well be a common occurrence until there is no more freshwater to drink, no protection of our wildlife, and our precious marine ecological systems to survive.

Madam Premier, can you apprise this House as to what actions you will take to rectify this situation of nonconformity of the sharing of information by the Alberta government? Mahsi.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Deh Cho. Honourable Premier.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I do agree with the Member. In fact, I think all of us probably agree with the Member on that. Water is life. It's important that we make sure that the water that comes into the Northwest Territories is clean. We have a transboundary agreement with the Government of Alberta that they are obligated to notify us. I know that the Minister is actively on this. He has stated earlier, in the questions that were just asked he is in the dispute -- meeting with the Minister in April. I believe he's already had phone calls, many phone calls. And I do know that they are beginning the dispute resolution process. If that does not go okay then I am prepared, as the Premier, to bring it to the -- directly to the Premier of Alberta. This is not okay, and this has to be addressed. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. And mahsi to the Premier for that information. It has never been okay since the beginning of the tailing ponds. The issue has never been okay there, yet we've been sending a Minister to do the big leader's jobs, to address this issue and I kind of don't like that; she's downplaying it and passing it off to the Ministers.

Mr. Speaker, the position of Premier holds the highest power in this Legislative Assembly and to stand strong on behalf of the residents of the Northwest Territories, as this case may well be, can the Premier extend an invitation to the Alberta Premier to come and meet with the Indigenous leadership of the Northwest Territories to hear their concerns with the tailings ponds and the protection of our waters? Mahsi.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd like to clarify and state that no, I am not downplaying the issue and I am not passing it off to a Minister. Ministers have jobs. The relationship is direct Minister to Minister, Premier to Premier. And if the Minister does not get through within the next while, then I will be bringing this forward. I would like to give benefit of the doubt to the Alberta Premier. I know that she hasn't been elected for very long. I am hoping, although not foolishly, but I am hoping that she just didn't get the proper briefing, that there is no transboundary agreement with Imperial Oil; the transboundary agreements are between the Alberta government and the Government of the Northwest Territories. So as stated, I will bring this forward if the Minister does not get proper resolution and I'd be more than pleased to invite the Alberta Premier to come meet with the Council of Leaders, the Indigenous governments of the Northwest Territories. I can commit to doing that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. And mahsi to the Premier for that. It's very imperative that, you know, I want to reiterate that we need -- as you're the Premier of the Northwest Territories, you're our biggest leader in this government, you need to engage the Alberta Premier who's never met the Indigenous people of the Northwest Territories. And we need to extend that invitation. You can do it how well you want to do that but extend that invitation to meet all Indigenous leaders of the Northwest Territories, not just the Intergovernmental Council, not just the NWT Council of Leaders, but everyone because there's three claimant groups that are excluded from those tables.

Mr. Speaker, the Premier of Alberta mentions the 2015 agreement in which the Alberta government does not need to inform the Government of the Northwest Territories of any spills or leaks because the leaks from the tailing ponds do not reach tributaries nor our drinking water. Yeah well, tell that the residents of the Northwest Territories. Tell that to the people of Fort Chipewyan who have been fighting the Alberta government for decades with no success.

Mr. Speaker, will the Premier approach the Alberta Premier to have frank discussions in redrafting the agreement to honour the voices of our First Nations people in the ultimate protection of our waters? Mahsi.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I stated before I have no problem, in fact I think it's a good idea, to invite the Alberta Premier to come to the Northwest Territories to meet with our Indigenous government leaders. Another clarification, Mr. Speaker, the Intergovernmental Council does have some Members that didn't sign on to devolution that are excluded. The Council of Leaders includes all Indigenous governments. Some don't attend but they're more than welcome. If there's any groups that are not part of that that the Member feels should be invited, then I'm more than willing to listen to the Member and invite those Members as well to that. So yes, Mr. Speaker, I do think it's important that these conversations happen. It's not only important, it's critical. And both the Minister is working diligently on this, and if there's no satisfaction then I will be addressing it further. This cannot be acceptable to any of us. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Oral questions. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions are for the Minister of Infrastructure. It's my understanding that this week alone there have been two incidents on the exorbitantly overpriced Prohibition Creek Access Road, including the rollover of a tractor-trailer vehicle. This is also the same contractor who cut the fibre optic line in January. Can the Minister provide this House with information on what is happening on this project? Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Minister responsible for Infrastructure.

Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Member is correct, there was an accident. We had -- we have Workers' Compensation looking into the matter. That's where we're at right now. Thank you.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That's great that WSCC is looking into it, however I'm wondering what the Minister and her department is doing. Does the department have an inspector out on this project regularly ensuring that safety protocols are being followed? Thank you.

Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned, this is under investigation by the workers -- WSCC so it's really hard for me to comment at this time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I don't really understand why the Minister can't answer about whether or not there's an employee from the Department of Infrastructure that has been out inspecting and watching this project for the last two months, given especially the fact that they cut the fibre optic line, and I still have not seen the locator reports from that time that I asked for ages ago. Thank you.

Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. So I do want to first talk about the traffic accident that happened at the Prohibition Creek. So I do want to say that no one was seriously injured at either incident. And we take health and safety very seriously, Mr. Speaker. So the department is undertaking an investigation at the contractor's site, including review of the contractor's health and safety plan as well as the traffic control plan. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. So, Mr. Speaker, is it safe to say then that this project has been shut down, and if so, how much is this going to cost us, what penalties will be -- have been built into this contract to ensure that these costs are not borne by the people of the Northwest Territories? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the contractor will resume work at the PCAR location this afternoon. The WSCC has reviewed the incident and has cleared us to proceed. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister of Lands. Can the Minister inform this House on what a rights-based cabin is as this term is something that his department has continued to use. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Minister responsible for Lands.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

First of all, I'd like to thank the Member for the question. We've had this conversation numerous times so I can tell the people of the Northwest Territories she's doing her due diligence in trying to get this information out there.

The department is working with the Indigenous governments and Indigenous organizations to distinguish potential rights-based cabins from unauthorized occupancy and to develop an approach to manage the rights-based cabins on public land. The department will continue the discussions with Indigenous governments and Indigenous organizations that want to engage with us on this work. Engagement started in February and will conclude in August of 2023. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Can the Minister tell why does the GNWT charge fees for leases to Indigenous people to exercise their right to establish camps on public lands as those camps are directly linked to harvesting? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the department regulates validation and pricing for all public lands. Leases are required where exclusive use of public land is required. Lease rents are charged to have exclusive usage. Indigenous people are encouraged to self-identify with the Department of Lands that they are rights-based land users and within their traditional area if they wish to maintain a camp or a cabin on public land without a tenure. Some Indigenous people prefer to maintain tenure for the benefit associated with such things as exclusive use, being able to sell the improvements and interests in the land or leave it to someone else in the estate. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I thank the Minister for the -- you know, I think what he's saying is something that might affect down here but when I speak to my region, you know, is the GNWT -- is it the GNWT's position that charging fees to Indigenous people for establishing camps is consistent with land claim and treaty rights, because in my Member's statement, Mr. Speaker, I did state in the IFA leases for fees, any type of fees that go along with harvesting, are to be -- there should be no fees. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you. And, again, I appreciate the Member's passion on this, and we've had this conversation numerous times. Any land claims or treaty rights establish the process for use of public land, and the GNWT follows that claim. So that is our process, and we've been following that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Final supplementary. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this government has done some great work. Education -- for Indigenous people. Education has, you know, eliminated semesters to -- like, they can go to school longer. You know, the affirmative action is going out, being reviewed for Indigenous employment. So can this Minister commit to pausing all lease fees and collection actions against Indigenous people until a full legal review can be done on this issue because I know, Mr. Speaker, in my -- in my region, I spoke to even one of the leaders today, are -- you know, is that -- and this is not happening, we're not listening, and so this need to stop until there's a good legal review. So will this Minister commit to that? Thank you.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as stated earlier, we have several processes underway working with Indigenous governments, including regulations for the Public Land Act. Until those processes are completed, the GNWT will continue to lease land in accordance with our Act and regulations. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. All day schools and residential schools were transferred to the GNWT on April 1st, 1969. During the 1969 school year, there were 10,291 students, 541 teachers, in the Northwest Territories, including Nunavut. This jurisdiction change did not result in change in management, and the Catholic Church and the Anglican Church continued to operate each school year under a contract. And their intentions remained the same: The extinguishment of the culture and traditional way of life of Indigenous people.

The federal government has acknowledged this harm for students prior to 1969 and provided compensation from anywhere from $10,000 to $200,000. This compensation should be identical after 1969.

Mr. Speaker, I want to ask the question to the Premier of the Northwest Territories, and I brought this to her attention a couple times already, and I just wanted to ask what steps has the Premier taken to address the GNWT's role in the day school program to make amends for the harms done and compensate for survivors after 1969? Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Honourable Premier.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the GNWT is not a party to the class action suits that are going on with the federal government; therefore, we don't have a direct role in the litigation that's happening. However, ECE has worked with students who have come forward to get their historical records. We've also provided letters in support for students that might have missing or incorrect personal information. And I do encourage that any residential school survivor to visit the indiandayschools.com to find more information on what's happening with these class actions. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The territorial government was born in 1967. Two years later, the Indian Federal Day School of Canada transferred that responsibility to the GNWT. And I understand what the Premier's saying that the GNWT's not part of the federal class action lawsuit prior to 1969. But after 1969, the abuse continued to happen to this day. So, again, is the government aware of the total number of days -- day home survivors in the Northwest Territories after 1969? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I don't have on hand the information related to the number of residents who attended -- who were students in the Indian day schools on hand and how many of those were Indigenous versus Caucasian. I mean, there was also Caucasian people that went to the schools after that time. However, as stated, we're working closely with any students that need supports and we're trying to offer as many supports as possible to people that are facing intergenerational trauma. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the scars of intergenerational trauma caused by residential day school continues in the present confining many Indigenous people to addiction, poor mental health, poverty. The day school program in particular has not been properly resolved and compensation is needed. Will the Premier ensure the day school survivors are compensated for trauma they suffered through day schools, in all the schools in the Northwest Territories, including my riding and also in the Tlicho region? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We try to support students, as many as possible, as they come forward. I do want to say, Mr. Speaker, that I recognize the trauma, the intergenerational trauma that's happened from colonization from the beginning, residential school as well. And not only those two but just the ongoing societal judgements that are put on Indigenous people. And so I do think that we have a responsibility to try to make sure that the health and wellness of our residents is taken care of. We're trying our best. We have many programs to support people with mental health, trauma. But we can't do it alone, Mr. Speaker. And so from the beginning of this government, I've tried to focus as much efforts as possible with working with Indigenous governments. That's why we formed the Council of Leaders. And I think that it's important that we work with the Council of Leaders as we go forward to address the intergenerational trauma. And it's not going to be something that will be addressed -- fixed in this government. It took decades of abuse that happened to Indigenous people to get where we are today and it will probably take -- hopefully not, but as long to deal with the trauma. So I will do my part, Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. And thank you, Premier, for your answers. And I know this is a very sensitive subject, and it hits home to everybody here in the Northwest Territories. And I'm also probably one of those survivors as well. So, you know, we -- I guess going forward, we need to really start looking as to how we're going to start dealing with this issue as a government and start looking at how we're going to address these outstanding issues with survivors after 1969. So I'm -- will the Premier work with her -- also with her counterparts in Nunavut to ensure that all students receive adequate compensation for their time in day schools regardless of jurisdiction? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We work with the northern territories, the Yukon and Nunavut, whenever possible. There's always strength in numbers; we realize that. I can make a commitment to the Member that I will bring this topic to the Premier of Nunavut, and that I can commit to. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Oral questions. Member for Hay River South.

Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, can the Premier confirm when the business plan for the Hay River Harbour remediation went into the federal government? Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Madam Premier.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. An application was submitted under the Oceans Protection Plan for the Hay River Harbour restoration on February 17th, 2023, and the Minister of Infrastructure is seeking $35 million over four years under this program. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Can the Premier confirm if it was just the one department, or did it go to any other departments in the federal government? Thank you.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This was submitted to Transport Canada. Discussions have also been ongoing with CIRNAC regarding this project. Infrastructure continues to lobby the federal government and to stress the importance of this marine hub, including the action needed to reduce risk to equipment and the environment, avoid the interruption of the essential resupply activities, and maintain safe and secure commercial marine shipping operations in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just got to run over and his questions.

Mr. Speaker, can the Premier confirm if any support for the application is requested from communities, Indigenous governments, businesses, or industry who rely on the services of MTS? Thank you.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'd be okay if he ran over and got the questions because I got the answers from the Minister of Infrastructure, so. Yes, we have requested letters of support from several groups to attach to the application. We're still able to accept any letters of support, if any other groups want to extend their support for our funding application. This pertains -- it impacts a lot of people, and so the more letters of support we have the more likely that we'll be successful in our lobbying. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Final supplementary. Member for Hay River South.

Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I was hoping that when I saw Mr. McLeod up in the audience there that he actually had a cheque for this project. But I see he's ran away.

Mr. Speaker, has application for permits required to remove silt from the channel in the harbour been submitted for approval, and if so, when can we expect to hear a response or approval for that? Thank you.

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Department of Infrastructure is in the engagement process right now and expected to submit the applications at the end of March. They're also in the process of engaging the federal government for funding support while the work proceeds on the regulation and permitting. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. Oral questions. Written questions. Returns to written questions. Mr. Clerk.

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Mr. Speaker, I have a Return to Written Question 59-19(2) asked by the Member for Deh Cho on February 16th, 2023, to the Minister of Health and Social Services regarding Health Care in Small Communities.

Audits conducted in the Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority, including the Deh Cho region, assess how a health service is administered. The audit process consists of an assessment of appropriate documentation in an individual's file, confirming that follow-up recommendation for the specific concern is documented and followed, and is compliant with the expected service standard. In addition, separate and specific audits are conducted to ensure information is transferred between health care providers or that medication information is documented and confirmed in accordance with the relevant policy.

For 2023-2024, Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority will begin a new cycle to review and implement audits for the core health services delivered to health centres and health cabins.

Patient satisfaction information is collected through a survey conducted across the territory. The most recent survey was concluded in 2022 and the report was released January 2023. Information is collected for health centres in small communities, however due to the small numbers of responses for certain questions, reporting is a detailed breakdown is not available for certain communities. The 2022 NWT Patient Experience Report can be found on the Department of Health and Social Services website. A standardized approach to audits was initiated in 2019 however this work was impacted during the pandemic due to limited capacity. Current audits are focused on reviewing the delivery of the diabetes prevention and management program.

Recent analysis of audited data from October to December 2022, for the Deh Cho region provides a baseline for future comparison. The data set was analyzed by community, as well as for the region, and currently demonstrates consistency with other regions. Trends identified in the audits will inform improvements into the delivery of services related to diabetes prevention and management.

Audits of service or program delivery are not the process to assess misdiagnosis. Investigation of a case of misdiagnosis is done through the quality review process that looks at an individual's experience with a disease diagnosis.

In cases when a diagnosis is provided in a manner that is inconsistent with a practice standard, or the person receives an incorrect, partial, no diagnosis, or did not experience receiving the information about their diagnosis in a safe manner, then a report by the person should be filed. The reported mishandling of an individual's case can be made to a health care provider or a manager within the health and social services system, the regulatory body of the health care provider, or with the Office of Client Experience. Each reported concern or complaint received by the Office of Client Experience is thoroughly reviewed.

Additionally, the reports are collectively reviewed at regular intervals to identify trends for further investigation and action.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Mr. Clerk. Returns to written questions. Replies to the Commissioner's address. Petitions. Reports of committees on the review of bills. Reports of standing and special committees. Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Your Standing Committee on Social Development is pleased to provide its Report on Bill 68: An Act to Amend the Child Day Care Act and commends it to the House.

Executive Summary

Bill 68: An Act to Amend the Child Day Care Act, sponsored by the Department of Education, Culture and Employment was referred to the Standing Committee on Social Development for review on November 3, 2022.

Committee thanks everyone who came forward in person and in written submissions for their time and candid comments. Committee appreciated the favourable response to a number of the motions and the willingness of ECE to work with us. Committee members believe the motions passed during the committee's clause by clause improved the bill. Committee accepted the new legislation with some proposed changes; one motion moved by committee was not concurred with, therefore, that amendment was not made and committee may address this concern during deliberations in Committee of the Whole or at third reading of Bill 68.

Bill 68 does not address the existing challenges of the NWT's early learning and child care sector or fix the damaged relationship between the sector and government. It does, however, put in place necessary basic rules, such as a certification process for educators, and allows the NWT to catch up with the other jurisdictions in this sector.

The Narrow Scope of Bill 68

Committee was disappointed when seeing Bill 68. This bill presents a missed opportunity to renew the NWT's early learning and child care system and provide guidance toward the system that considers the diverse needs of the NWT environment and includes all parties. Bill 68 offers a narrow scope for amendment, with the areas open for change being limited and dispersed throughout the Act. The bill changes small sections here and there in the Act, and committee was not able to propose any whole-scale amendments. Committee finds this narrow approach another missed opportunity.

A Crisis in Trust and Relationship

Committee sees serious issues with the confidence in ECE rolling out this program. Many people think that making day care more affordable is a good thing. But how ECE has done it has created more problems. Committee did review Bill 68. This bill will not fix the damaged relationships.

It appears that the GNWT left child care operators exasperated and feeling cornered after lacking to show the intent to collaborate with child care operators from the beginning and insufficiently communicating the GNWT's larger vision of child care.

Committee finds that the GNWT showed a lack of comprehension regarding the seriousness and comprehensiveness of the issues created by forcing a fast start to the transition of the territories' child care system.

Members heard from child care providers that they have lost trust in the GNWT to responsibly guide the transition, providers sense a misjudgment in the real issues and perceive a bias in looking at provider-client relationships.

Recommendation 1: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that the GNWT:

  1. Form an advisory group including representation from all parties.
  2. Review the 2030 Early Learning and Child Care Strategy on the inclusion of child care operators in goals and vision.
  3. Establish and share an NWT vision and mission of early learning and child care sector, including principles and explaining where the federal child care agreements fit, requiring five-year reviews to check if NWT is fulfilling its vision.
  4. Conduct an independent review of the roll out of the Early Learning and Child Day Care Agreement.
  5. Conduct an independent review of the Child Day Care Act.
  6. Address the crisis of confidence by reconciling with the NWT ELCC sector and starting with:
  • Improving communication by increasing responsiveness to clients and establishing client service standards; and
  • Committing to explaining processes to the public before implementation, providing plain language materials and designating communication channels for operators to access ECE specialists and information.

On Complaints and Appeals

Bill 68 introduces a new section on complaints giving parents the right to file a complaint and enabling the director to investigate the complaint. Committee understands that ECE's policy intent is to allow complaints to protect the rights of families. Committee deliberated on the circumstances where the director may refuse to investigate, and on allowing disclosure of the complainant, termination of a contract, and the right to appeal.

Currently, the director has no guidance on when to refuse to investigate a complaint. Committee thought that it was important to clarify when the director may refuse to investigate.

Committee proposed adding clarity to the complaints process by way of Motion 1, adding a paragraph allowing the director to refuse to investigate a complaint if the complaint is trivial, frivolous, vexatious, or made in bad faith.

Recommendation 2: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that ECE improve and provide clarity on how a person may complain about an organization's service to the public by:

  1. Providing guidance material for the complaints process to support parents and staff; and,
  2. Developing a policy on the complaints process.

Recommendation 3: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that the GNWT:

  • Provide investigative training to all staff involved in the complaints and appeals processes.
  • Make this training obligatory for all staff involved.
  • Build competence by ensuring that investigations are not vexatious and are appropriately carried out.

Complaints and Retaliation

Committee heard about cases where the relationships between child care operators and parents progressed to disrepair. In such situations of a bad fit, prolonging such an unproductive relationship would be undesirable. To prohibit that in such case contract termination is interpreted as retaliation, committee found it necessary to clarify that to prohibit retaliation does not prevent contract termination.

Committee proposed Motion 3, expressing that nothing can prevent an operator from terminating a contract under the terms of that contract. Should the operator do that, it would not constitute retaliation for the purposes of the Act. The Minister concurred with the Motion.

Recommendation 4: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that the GNWT ensures that administrative decisions are reasonable by considering the outcome of decisions and the process to come to that decisions.

Appeals Process

Committee has reservations about the appeals process as it is designated in the Act, as appeals are currently limited to the licensing processes. Members were generally of the view that the complaints process and the appeal process could use a review, given the expanded scope of the GNWT's role in early child education and as a result of the agreement with Canada. Given that this task is partially outside the scope of Bill 68 and would require significant policy work to see how these issues are handled in other jurisdictions, committee makes the following recommendation:

Recommendation 5: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that the GNWT review the appeals process in the Child Day Care Act,

a) in the short term with a view to:

  1. Identify and make improvements to make sure that the Act clearly outlines how appeals can be requested and considered;
  2. Clarify how complaints and appeal processes are distinguished in the Act; and,
  3. Recommend how administrative decisions are made fairly, consistently, and in accordance with the legislation.

b) In the long term with the view to:

  1. Fully review the appeals section;
  2. Include comparison with other jurisdictions; and,
  3. Result in a modernized appeal section.

Considering the Costs of Child Care

While the GNWT does not provide child care services, it is even more critical that policy development considers the supply and cost of child care and addresses the provision of child care to make it sustainable. The committee determined that it would be paramount for the Minister to commit to supporting the sustainability of child care and put forward the obligation for the Minister to consider costs in Motion 4. The Minister of ECE concurred.

Recommendation 6: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends the GNWT include in its vision of a sustainable child care system information on the following:

  • How to support the ELCC sector in its transition.
  • How to embrace NWT realities without disadvantaging any of the existing parts of the child care sector.
  • Considerations for licensing and supporting that proportion of the child care sector constituted by for-profit day homes.

Understanding the Needs of the Child Care Sector

Repeatedly, committee heard that the funding provided by the GNWT for child care is insufficient. In communication with committee, ECE expressed it is committed to working with licensed programs to support sustainability and growth throughout the system. However, committee sees a pressing need for the GNWT and ECE to act to prevent losing child care spaces in the NWT and makes the following recommendation:

Recommendation 7: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends the GNWT recognize that the actions started under the federal agreement have initiated systems change in the NWT Early Learning and child care sector and require immediate action by the GNWT to reduce the volatility that may unfold;

And further,

Identify shortfalls in funding targets outside of the federal agreement, focused on NWT needs, including but not limited to:

  • Capital and operating funding allocations;
  • Incentive loans for new buildings and retrofits;
  • Campaign action attracting potential child care educators;
  • Bonus for child care certificate completions; and,
  • Strategies to support professional development for ELCC workers to allow training without impacting existing work schedules.

Getting Regulations Right

Bill 68 adds many regulations to the existing legislation. Committee wanted to see a duty on the Minister to engage the child care operators in developing the regulations, specifically on fees and wages. Committee welcomed the department's intent to consult and prepared a motion placing an obligation on ECE to consult on all regulations, not just those that the committee had identified as having a financial impact.

Motion 5 obliges the Minister to provide a copy of the proposed regulations to child care operators to ensure reasonable time for feedback and consider the feedback in the regulations. The Minister concurred with this motion.

Committee sees the review requirement of regulations as a solid opportunity for ECE to be inclusive and show flexibility when considering the feedback received.

Recommendation 8: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends the GNWT view the obligation to consult on regulations as an opportunity for innovation, inclusiveness, flexibility and reconciliation and be open to considering detailed feedback.

Privacy

Committee took the position that it is necessary to create an environment of certainty and clarity and ensure privacy protection for parents and children. The determination was made that ECE should have a privacy impact assessment conducted after drafting the regulations and before the regulations go into the public review phase.

Committee proposed Motion 6, requiring the Minister to ensure compliance with section 42.1 of the Access to Information and Privacy Act before recommending regulations. The Minister concurred with this motion.

Measures Increasing the Number of Child Care Places

All submissions pointed to insufficient child care spaces in the NWT. Presenters spoke about 300 and 400 children being on waitlists in licensed child care centres in Yellowknife. The need for spaces outnumbers licensed space in the regional centres. In the NWT overall, thirteen communities are without licensed child care facilities. Committee finds the situation alarming and urges the GNWT to respond to the need and investigate innovative options for creating child care spots without additional costs.

Recommendation 9: The Standing Committee on Social Development urges the GNWT to be innovative and identify options for increasing child day care spots at no or little costs, including, but not limited to:

  • Changing the ratio of educators to children under two years of age by reducing the age of the infant category to children under 18 months of age. This would create additional spaces for children 18 months and older.
  • Completing negotiations with NWT Housing to allow licensed child care to operate in public housing.
  • Creating subgroups or sublicenses to allow child care centres, school-based child care, and child care offered in homes to offer licensed spaces.
  • Create substitute lists or licensing to backfill so that if one educator gets sick, not all six kids must stay home.
  • Create additional lists or licensing to enable before- and after- school day care, including evening care, so that educators who have time can take additional hours.

Conclusion

Recommendation 10: The Standing Committee on Social Development recommends that the GNWT provide a response to the recommendations contained in this report within 120 days. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion?

Some Hon. Members

Question.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Any abstentions? The motion is carried. The committee report has been received and adopted by the Assembly.

---Carried

Reports of standing and special -- oh, Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Great Slave, that Committee Report 48-19(2), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 68: An Act to Amend the Child Day Care Act, be deemed read and printed in Hansard in its entirety. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion?

Some Hon. Members

Question.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Any abstentions? The motion is carried. The report is deemed read ---

---Carried

Link to Committee Report 48-19(2)

Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the Member for Great Slave, that Committee Report 48-19(2), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Bill 68: An Act to Amend the Child Day Care Act, be received by the Assembly and referred to the Committee of the Whole. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion?

Some Hon. Members

Question.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Any abstentions? The motion is carried. The committee report has been received and will be moved into the Committee of the Whole for further consideration later today. Thank you.

---Carried

Reports of standing and special committees. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Environment and Natural Resources.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following three documents: Plain Language Summary for Bill 74, Forest Act; Letter to Alberta Minister of Environment and Protected Areas Information dated March 7, 2023, regarding Information Sharing and Notification: Spills at Kearl Mine Site; and,
Letter to Federal Minister of Environment and Climate Change dated March 7, 2023, regarding Information Sharing and Notification: Spills at Kearl Mine Site. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for Finance.

Caroline Wawzonek

Caroline Wawzonek Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents: Plain Language Summary for Bill 75, Council for Women and Gender Diversity
Act; and, Government of the Northwest Territories Response to Committee Report 45-19(2), Report on the Review of Bill 60: An Act to Amend the Petroleum Products and Carbon Tax Act. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Tabling of documents. Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table a document the Pharmacists' Scope of Practice in Canada from the Canadian Pharmacists Association. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Tabling of documents. Notices of motion. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Lesa Semmler

Lesa Semmler Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, I give notice that on Tuesday, March 28th, 2023, I will move the following motion:

Now therefore I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Yellowknife North, that this Legislative Assembly calls upon the Government of the Northwest Territories to forgive and pause the collection of current and new lease payments and fees of all Indigenous cabin leaseholders immediately;

And further, that the Government of the Northwest Territories complete a review of cabin and recreational leases to ensure that there is no infringement of Indigenous rights through the collection of taxes and fees;

And furthermore, the Government of the Northwest Territories develop a more consistent land use policy that are representative of completed land resource and self-government agreements and ongoing land resource and self-agreement negotiations;

And furthermore, the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to this motion within 120 days. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Notices of motion. Colleagues, we will return after a short recess.

---SHORT RECESS

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Okay, let us continue, Members. Motions. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker,

WHEREAS adequate and affordable housing is the most important concern of many Northerners;

AND WHEREAS without adequate, affordable, and accessible housing, individuals and families lack the basis for healthy living, successful educational participation, security of employment, and participation as full members in the economies, health, and development of our communities;

AND WHEREAS excessive and unexpected rental increases in private rental units can result in debilitating rents, especially upon low-income earners;

AND WHEREAS renters require protection and support against high costs of living for inadequate lodging circumstances;

AND WHEREAS the low vacancy rate indicates strong rental market demand and puts upward pressure on rental prices;

AND WHEREAS the Northwest Territories Residential Tenancies Act does not include a mechanism which dictates how much a landlord can increase their rent, only how often that rent increase can occur.

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Frame Lake, that this Legislative Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories update the Northwest Territories Residential Tenancies Act to include maximum allowable rent adjustments which are no more than the five-year average of the Canada Consumer Price Index;

AND FURTHER, the Government include in the Northwest Territories Residential Tenancies Act that increases to rent above the five-year average of the Canada Consumer Price Index can be applied for by private landlords to the Northwest Territories' rental officer;

AND FURTHER, the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to this motion within 120 days. And I will request a recorded vote, Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I think that my motion is pretty self-explanatory. Over the last while we have seen an increase in rents in our market here in Yellowknife, and in some cases as much as 46 percent people's rent has increased in one month. We do not currently, as I stated, have any parameters or measures in place in the Residential Tenancies Act to protect renters against high increases to their rent. Only we limit the amount of times or when the landlords can actually bring those increases forward.

As part of this motion, I did look at a jurisdictional scan, Mr. Speaker, of different territories, different provinces, and what they're doing. Currently there are six jurisdictions that have maximum allowable rent increases, which is British Columbia, Manitoba, Ontario, PEI, Nova Scotia, and the Yukon. There are two that have jurisdictions with recommended maximum of allowable rent increases, but this is not in force, and that's in Quebec and New Brunswick. And then there are five left that don't have any limitations to the amount of the rent increase, which includes the Northwest Territories, Nunavut, Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland and Labrador.

Mr. Speaker, why I think that this is so important to do is that given the very, very low vacancy rate right now in our territory for the rental market, private rental units, it leaves our residents vulnerable. As we can see, it's very apparent to large landlords that they can just come in and increase the rent in the apartment without doing any upgrades and sometimes not even providing any heat to the people living in the apartments. I think it sets a dangerous precedent if we don't do anything now to stop this because there's nothing that's going to stop large REITs, like Northview, from deciding that they don't want to rent to low income families and instead would rather rent to the professionals and the students that may be moving north in the next while. We need these people as well but, in this case, it's going to be on the backs of our vulnerable people. So therefore, Mr. Speaker, I think it's very important that we set this precedent now, and I welcome the debate from my colleagues. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Frame Lake.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I want to thank the mover for the work on this motion. I think we need to have this discussion and debate, Mr. Speaker. This is one of the tools that we can have in our arsenal to try to prevent homelessness, and I think we need -- as I said, we need to have this discussion and debate.

You know, if you look at the motion, this is a request for this issue to be examined. We're going to hear from the government side about this. And of course if the government is not prepared to take action, it might be the subject of a potential private Member's bill at some point. But I do think we need to have this discussion and debate. And I look forward to the response from the government on this. I will be supporting the motion. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Yeah, thank you, Mr. Speaker. And I too support this motion. You know, we've been -- housing's a big issue here in the Northwest Territories. And, you know, in my riding in particular, you know, it's to the point where I even have to put documents and everything else on the floor here just to finally get any action. And we already know that there's big problem -- we actually have a housing crisis here in the Northwest Territories. We have no plan. When I take a look at what Nunavut's doing, when we take a look at what, you know, our -- the way we handle housing here in the Northwest Territories and we're still -- we're still a shortage of public housing in our communities. You know, and we -- again, we got no new construction in our communities for a very long time. And so what's going on now I'm dealing with -- I also tabled documents in this House about my -- some of my constituents having cockroaches and all that stuff running around their units. It's -- you know, and yet the landlords don't do anything. You know, and I'm really concerned about that. So,

Yes, you know, this -- some of the leases we also have, they're month-to-month leases. You know, and when you do that, and it gives an opportunity for the landlord to increase their rent any time they want. And so we can't manage this so we need to have a mechanism, a tool in our tool chest, to say that this is something that we could use to manage that. So, Mr. Speaker, I do support the motion. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the motion brought forward by my colleague from Great Slave, and I also appreciate the work that was put into the jurisdictional scan so that we know what the rest of Canada looks like. Canadian jurisdictions are quite obviously split as far as rent increase caps are concerned, but our sister territory to the west, Yukon, does allow a buffer against the impacts of high inflation as measured by CPI but this is to a maximum of 5 percent.

Mr. Speaker, I understand a need for certainty, but this also needs to be balanced with the sustainability of the housing sector and availability of more developers to get involved. Landlords cannot be left footing the bill when inflation exceeds the rent cap and developers and landlords also need to be able, Mr. Speaker, to keep rents affordable but need a mechanism to address unexpected expenses like a broken furnace, boiler, if flooding occurs. Things happen, and those things need to be able to be addressed, Mr. Speaker.

I also want to ensure that the housing co-ops, which are provided at cost, can continue to be responsive to what the cost actually is and continue to operate. Kam Lake is lucky to have two housing co-ops, and I think the North would benefit from having more housing opportunities like that.

There's other ways the GNWT can also play a role in ensuring that rents don't go through the roof and that affordable housing exists outside of the department of housing. And those roles are things like addressing the funding gap, increasing availability of land, dealing with the affordability of energy, addressing supply chain challenges and the cost of goods, especially in our small communities, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, I will be supporting this motion today because it simply asks the government to explore the balance between affordable housing and, importantly, sustaining the industry for developers. But there is a need, in my opinion, for exceptions to these rules and for escape clauses that acknowledge the cost of maintaining infrastructure in the Northwest Territories. And I really want to highlight that, that we don't want to end up with no one willing to enter the housing game because there's no certainty in them actually being able to recoup the cost of being part of that community and that industry that we very much need. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion. Acting Government House Leader.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as this motion contains the recommendations to the government, Cabinet will be abstaining. We look forward to reviewing the recommendation and providing a full response within 120 days. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Some Hon. Members

Question.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called. Member for Great Slave. To closing debate.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My first motion, so still learning how it call works. I want to thank my colleagues for being a lot more eloquent than I was in explaining some of the rationale around why this is needed. And, really, the intent is not to kneecap the landlords, or particularly not the small landlords. I really want them to feel that, you know, that they're supported and they're really needed in our territory and that is why, at my colleague's suggestion, that we did include the piece around the potential to apply to the rental office for an increase.

Mostly, Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to get the dialogue started. I wanted the territory's residents to understand and know that their leadership is listening to them and that we hear them and that we do understand that the cost of living is becoming quite unbearable. Mr. Speaker, I was at the store yesterday and the cat food's gone up $4 a bag. So everywhere you look and turn, things are getting more expensive. So I appreciate my colleague's support on this. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. The motion is in order. To the motion. The Member's requested a recorded vote. All those in favour, please rise.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 5839

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Member for Great Slave. The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. The Member for Deh Cho. The Member for Kam Lake. The Member for Frame Lake. The Member for Nunakput. The Member for Yellowknife North. The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. The Member for Monfwi.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 5839

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

All those opposed, please rise. All those abstaining, please rise.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 5839

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Nahendeh. The Member for Yellowknife South. The Member for Sahtu. The Member for Range Lake. The Member for Inuvik Boot Lake. The Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Page 5839

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

The results of the recorded vote: Nine in favour, zero opposed, six abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Motions. Member for Frame Lake.

Kevin O'Reilly

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President.

I MOVE, second by the honourable Member for Nahendeh, that when this House adjourns on Thursday, March 9th, 2023, it shall be adjourned until Monday, March 27th, 2023;

AND FURTHMORE, at any time prior to March 27th, 2023, if the Speaker is satisfied, after consultation with the Executive Council and Members of the Legislative Assembly, the public interest requires that the House should meet at an earlier date, earlier time during the adjournment, or at a time later than the scheduled resumption of the House, the Speaker may give notice and thereupon the House shall meet at the time stated in such notice and shall transact its business as if it had been duly adjourned to that time. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Frame Lake. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Some Hon. Members

Question.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Any abstentions? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Motions. Notices of motion for the first reading of bills. Minister responsible for Health and Social Services.

Bill 77: Nursing Profession Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

Julie Green

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, I give notice that on Tuesday, March 28th, 2023, I will present Bill 77, Nursing Profession Act, to be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 77: Nursing Profession Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Notices of motion for the first reading of bills. Minister responsible for Environment and Natural Resources.

Bill 78: Waste Reduction and Resource Recovery Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I give notice that on Tuesday, March 28th, 2023, I will present Bill 78, Waste Reduction and Resource Recovery Act, to be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 78: Waste Reduction and Resource Recovery Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Minister. Notices of motion for the first reading of bills. Madam Premier.

Bill 79: An Act to Amend the Judicature Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

Caroline Cochrane

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, I give notice that on Tuesday, March 28th, 2023, we will present Bill 79, An Act to Amend the Judicature Act, to be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 79: An Act to Amend the Judicature Act
Notices Of Motion For The First Reading Of Bills

Page 5840

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Madam Premier. First reading of bills. Member for Frame Lake.