Legislative Assembly photo

Roles

Elsewhere

Crucial Fact

  • His favourite word was know.

Last in the Legislative Assembly November 2015, as MLA for Weledeh

Won his last election, in 2011, with 89% of the vote.

Statements in the House

Supplementary To Question 51-16(1): Renewable Energy Development Initiatives November 28th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it’s this concern about costs and lack of full cost accounting that has brought us to this situation where we now have a changing climate leading to the death of millions of people around the world annually, real challenges to our food, while fossil fuel costs are soaring and so on. We need to get ahead of the game. Just on the ITI’s reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, on your recent trip to China, did the department cover carbon offset costs of that travel; something you can do with a click of a button and a fairly minor cost as a way of demonstrating your commitment to reducing climate change and greenhouse gas emissions? Thank you.

Question 51-16(1): Renewable Energy Development Initiatives November 28th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my question is to the Minister of industry, trade and investment, Mr. McLeod, and it’s to follow up on the renewable energy statement I made this morning. The Pembina Institute put out a report, “Five Years of Failure,” documenting how volunteer efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions does not work. It certainly didn’t work on its own; we need some regulation. I don’t believe we’ve ever required any industrial project to provide even one percent of their energy needs from renewable energy sources. This obviously is clearly way out of date. Is the Minister’s department working to begin requiring at least some amount of renewable energy development in every project the department has to do with in every development? Thank you.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery November 28th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize a constituent, Mr. Dick Abernethy, who also happens to be the father of my colleague Mr. Glen Abernethy here from Great Slave.

---Applause

Renewable Energy In The NWT November 28th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the NWT Wind Energy Conference opens today in Tuktoyaktuk. In recognition of this event, I want to talk about renewable energy and what it can mean to the Northwest Territories.

Wind energy is about one form of renewable energy, which includes hydro, solar, ground source heat, and biomass such as wood or peat. Renewable energy is carbon neutral; that is, it produces very few greenhouse gas emissions which cause climate change. Almost all our greenhouse gas emissions come from fossil fuel energy such as oil, gas or coal. Renewable energy is also a form of energy that is much more labour intensive, producing long-term locally rooted jobs.

Amazingly, production of wind energy has been increasing by 30 percent per year around the world. After running into technical glitches in the ‘70s and ’80s, adjustments were made to correct those problems. Wind generators are now being produced in units that can produce 2.5 megawatts and greater under good wind conditions, enough to power a community of 1,200 people.

The countries that did the development work are, of course, the ones that adopted it quickly and now export this technology around the world.

Wind energy has become a major tool in reducing a country’s greenhouse gas emissions. Its growth continues while costs decline; again, especially relative to fossil fuels.

Mr. Speaker, the NWT experimented with wind energy in the 1980s when this technology was problematic, but we did not move with the times and realize the great opportunity afforded by the new technology. The wind conference in Tuk is an indication of progressive movement to get back on track and capitalize on the opportunities that wind can offer.

In a larger way, it highlights many of the opportunities we in the North have been missing to reduce our costs while also reducing our contribution to climate change. All of the forms of renewable energy are applicable in the Northwest Territories. This is because of the fortunate pattern of renewable energy being roughly equally available around the globe.

Finally, Mr. Speaker, renewable energy is of a scale that fits our communities and is ideal for small business and local economies with the appropriate supports and policies in place. But I stress the right policies and support. The removal of barriers requires broad thinking from Aurora College programs in renewable energy to grid-tied renewable energy, to local business training. Mr. Speaker, let’s get it done. Thank you.

---Applause

Question 24-16(1): Approaches To Government Infrastructure In Response To Climate Change November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I’m very happy to hear that. On the issue of transportation, of course, a great majority of our greenhouse gas emissions are from transportation. Will the Minister commit to ensuring that all of the infrastructure that your departments have a hand in developing will both focus on the mitigation as well as the adaptation? Thank you very much.

Question 24-16(1): Approaches To Government Infrastructure In Response To Climate Change November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Was it recognized that building infrastructure is an important opportunity to also mitigate climate change? That is, reduce the causes of climate change at the same time as adapting to it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 24-16(1): Approaches To Government Infrastructure In Response To Climate Change November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question is all for the Minister of ITI, I believe, Bob McLeod. The Minister responsible for climate change, perhaps.

---Laughter

I understand the Minister attended a federal/provincial/territorial Ministers' meeting recently where the need to respond to climate change was discussed as a priority and infrastructure in particular was discussed. How will the Minister ensure that infrastructure related to ITI and developed in the North will address the concerns of climate change? Thank you.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize a constituent who was not able to attend our First Session in October and also happens to be my lovely wife, Marianne Bromley.

---Applause

Government Support For The Voluntary Sector November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, for maximum benefits here, our government and the voluntary sector must work closely together, more closely than we have in the past. We must ensure a clear line of communication between ourselves and our partners at the decision-making level. We must ensure government policy and support is developed together with those who can draw on much front-line experience. Importantly, Mr. Speaker, we must ensure government-wide coordination and integration in implementation of the Volunteer Support Initiative and in all of our dealings with the voluntary sector. A joint GNWT voluntary sector working group under the Department of the Executive may be the best way to achieve this. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Government Support For The Voluntary Sector November 27th, 2007

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to speak to government support for the volunteer sector. We know that there are many demands on government resources and that we need to stretch those resources to meet as many of those demands as we can while still fully meeting all of our goals. There are essential services that must be delivered effectively and efficiently and government cannot do it all. These services affect the well-being of all citizens in the NWT, services that deal with homelessness and poverty, substance abuse, youth justice, environmental education and protection, sport and recreation and the list goes on.

Fortunately, our government has able and willing partners to meet these needs, partners collectively referred to as the voluntary sector. Mr. Speaker, I am particularly thinking here of those working for the good of all, the common good. The annual economic value of volunteerism here in the NWT is almost $70 million. That is every year. This valuable contribution is worthy of wise investment and support by this government.

To quote the YWCA, "The voluntary sector is essential to the democratic process." Like the marketplace which creates economic wealth in our society or the government which protects institutional memory of how to effectively govern ourselves, the voluntary sector creates and expands social capital. Social capital refers to the values and networks that enable coordination and cooperation at the community level building trust, mutually beneficial relationships, inclusion and tolerance. The voluntary sector includes all self-organized groups of people committed to the betterment of human life and has a key role in the advancement of human well-being. It is all

about citizen participation and engagement in community betterment.

Mr. Speaker, while the 15th Assembly committed to

implementing the Volunteer Support Initiative, only modest progress has been made. While many or all of our departmental mandates overlap with the areas in which volunteer groups are active, responsibility for supporting this sector seems lodged in only one department, that of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my Member’s statement.