This is page numbers 913 - 942 of the Hansard for the 12th Assembly, 7th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was chairman.

Topics

Support To Newfoundland Government For Use Of Seals
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Ballantyne. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Patterson.

Proposal Call For Orthodontic Services In Iqaluit Region
Item 3: Members' Statements

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I was delighted with the proposal, made undoubtedly with the

encouragement of the Minister of Health, to provide orthodontic services in the Baffin region recently. However, I was very concerned that the Iqaluit Dental Clinic, which has existed since 1987, was not informed about the proposal call for orthodontic services. The proposal call was advertised in a Yellowknife-based newspaper and only at the very last minute was it advertised in Nunatsiaq News, published in Iqaluit.

I was even more disappointed to learn that the proposal call issued by the Baffin Regional Health Board seems intent on setting up its own dental facility through this proposal call. I do not know if this direction has been encouraged or authorized by the Minister of Health, but it certainly seems to be contrary to the GNWT policy of supporting established local businesses, as is done in the communities with our hotel accommodations, for example.

The Iqaluit dental facility is far bigger than the population requires and, therefore, will easily accommodate visiting orthodontic services, as it already does for visiting oral surgeons.

Mr. Speaker, the proposed schedule for the proposal call also seems oriented, both towards short-term orthodontic care and also to a very large and unnecessary involvement in its management by the Baffin Regional Health Board. I believe that where local clinics exist, the proposal call should be structured so as to encourage orthodontists to make arrangements with local clinics for space, equipment, et cetera. The Baffin Regional Health Board should only be involved in providing the direct costs for travel and accommodation, as is done and seems to be working in Yellowknife.

Finally, Mr. Speaker, the Iqaluit Dental Clinic has been established since 1987. As this is the only service providing dental care to the people in Iqaluit and the Baffin region today, this clinic saw it as its duty to increase specialist dental care.

Now, the proposal call has been issued and it seems designed to leave out the Iqaluit Dental Clinic. This proposal call should be reviewed and improved so as to recognize the existence of existing clinics like the Iqaluit Dental Clinic as a basis for new orthodontic services. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Proposal Call For Orthodontic Services In Iqaluit Region
Item 3: Members' Statements

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Mr. Patterson. Item 3, Members' statements. Are there any further Members' statements? Item 4, returns to oral questions. Mr. Morin.

Further Return To Question 423-12(7): Responsibility For Collection Of Damage Deposits
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

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Don Morin Tu Nedhe

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have a return to an oral question asked by Mr. Koe regarding the responsibility for collection of damage deposits. The responsibility to pay for damages to rental units belongs first to the tenant. When the local housing organization makes repairs, the money is paid out of the maintenance budget. A bill is then sent to the tenant. When the bill is paid, the money is put back into the maintenance budget.

Sometimes a bill is not paid, and this means that the money from the maintenance budget will not be returned. This is a problem because it can mean that some maintenance work cannot be done because the budget has run out.

The corporation helps the local housing organizations to collect for these damages, and encourages LHOs to act to prevent damage to these homes.

The corporation's funding of local housing organizations allows for the LHOs to recover the money from the corporation for uncollectible tenant damages after every effort has been made by the LHOs to collect from the tenants. This makes sure that other tenants are not penalized because someone damages their unit and cannot pay for the repairs. I want to make sure that good tenants still have good homes. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 423-12(7): Responsibility For Collection Of Damage Deposits
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Mr. Arngna'naaq.

Further Return To Question 397-12(7): Consultation Re Amendments To Migratory Birds Convention
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

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Silas Arngna'naaq Kivallivik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have a return to an oral question asked by Mr. Zoe concerning consultation regarding amendment to Migratory Bird Convention Act. To develop a national position on amending the migratory bird convention, which is the treaty between US and Canada, the federal government began its three-year consultation process in 1990. Bilateral meetings were held between the federal government and migratory bird management stakeholders, including in the Northwest Territories, the Denendeh Conservation Board, the Wildlife Management Advisory Council in the Inuvialuit settlement area and the then Nunavut Wildlife Management Advisory Board.

In April 1992, the last formal public consultations occurred with regional meetings in Iqaluit and Yellowknife. Chief Joe Rabesca of Rae attended the Yellowknife session and capably provided input from his people. Subsequent additional ad hoc meetings were held in Canada to permit further input from aboriginal organizations. The federal government is currently assessing the options for recognizing aboriginal and treaty rights in either the convention or Canada's Migratory Bird Convention Act.

The Department of Renewable Resources attended most meetings and facilitated territorial input so that territorial concerns could be incorporated into the final Canadian position. Throughout this process, the Department of Renewable Resources provided advice to the federal government and promoted the concept of fair, legitimate, northern access to this renewable resources.

The Government of the Northwest Territories does not have a representative on the Canadian negotiating team for the amendment to the migratory bird convention nor have we had any contact with the negotiating team. Three aboriginal representatives have been appointed to the negotiating team: Mr. Phillip Awashish, who represents the Assembly of First Nations; Ms. Rosemarie Kuptana, who represents Inuit; and, Mr. Jim Bourque, who represents the Metis. The other members are three from Foreign Affairs Canada, two from Environment Canada and one representing the provinces and territories.

The formal negotiations with the United States will begin in the last week of April. Once the amendment to the convention is drafted and agreed to, the Government of Canada must revise Canadian Migratory Bird Convention Act. I will keep Members advised of any progress. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Further Return To Question 397-12(7): Consultation Re Amendments To Migratory Birds Convention
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions
Item 4: Returns To Oral Questions

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Mr. Patterson.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Dennis Patterson Iqaluit

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank an honourable Member for pointing out to me that Mr. Ben McDonald of the UNW is in the gallery, but he's not in his usual seat, directly across from me. I don't know if that means he no longer feels he has to monitor my performance representing workers, that he isn't flattered by my frequent recognition of his presence in the gallery or maybe it just means that someone else is sitting in his seat today.

---Laughter

---Applause

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Mr. Lewis.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

April 10th, 1995

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Brian Lewis Yellowknife Centre

I don't know if our rules permit this, Mr. Speaker, but I also would like to recognize Mr. Ben McDonald in the gallery. He is sitting opposite me. He has lived in my constituency for many, many years. He has been a colleague in different community things. I would like to commend him for his dedication, endurance and patience in attending our Legislature as part of his work. I do this, Mr. Speaker, because it takes a special individual to sit through all this without any opportunity to participate. Thank you.

---Applause

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Mr. Whitford.

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Tony Whitford Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, colleagues. Today I would like to recognize some of the students from the Range Lake North primary grades, the enrichment program, grades three and five. Their teacher is Ms. Teri Arngna'naaq. She is not able to accompany them today, but the parents who did accompany them are Mrs. Barbara Bilodeau and Rennie Carlson. Welcome to the Assembly.

---Applause

Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Item 5: Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Item 6, oral questions. Mr. Ballantyne.

Question 440-12(7): Support For Maritime Fishing And Sealing Industries
Item 6: Oral Questions

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Michael Ballantyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am not quite sure who this question should go to, it could be the Premier, but she is not here; or the Minister of Intergovernmental Affairs, but he's not here. It could either be Mr. Arngna'naaq or Mr. Todd. Why don't I try Mr. Arngna'naaq, and if that is the wrong place, feel free to have one of those more appropriate to answer.

Mr. Speaker, I brought up in my Member's statement the whole area of major issues, national issues, happening right now that directly affect us. And I see a tremendous opportunity for us to support both Maritime governments and the federal government in their efforts to protect the turbot fishery.

And I see an opportunity right now with the province of Newfoundland, for us to support the efforts of the Newfoundland government and again, Mr. Tobin, to revitalize the seal industry. Would the Minister be prepared, along with a delegation of Inuit seal hunters and turbot fishermen, to travel to the Maritime provinces and demonstrate some strong support for the efforts of our government with these areas? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 440-12(7): Support For Maritime Fishing And Sealing Industries
Item 6: Oral Questions

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The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Minister of Renewable Resources, Mr. Arngna'naaq.