This is page numbers 275-298 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, the Member is correct. We did experience an earlier spring than normal. As the river broke up early on the Peel and the Mackenzie it kind of caught the department a little off guard in getting some of these things. One of the issues with the Tsiigehtchic and Peel River ferries was we had scheduled Transport Canada inspectors to come in for the replacement bottom of the Tsiigehtchic ferry, and at the same time they're in there to do the Peel River ferry. So with the early spring and stuff, it's kind of caught us off guard from our normal scheduling, so that's one of the reasons for the holdup was the late arrival of federal inspectors.

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned, the Tsiigehtchic ferry was launched on Friday I believe and started service Sunday afternoon. So I'd like to ask the Minister, why is the Peel River ferry not launched and not in service at this time?

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As I alluded to earlier in my statement that the transportation of Canada inspector was in. He was there to look at the Tsiigehtchic ferry as we replaced the bottom of that ferry and put it in and do it's seaworthiness which takes a couple days of trials and stuff. When they were finished that they moved on to the Peel ferry. The Peel ferry is in the process of going through its inspection as such and with the low water now expected after high water from breakup we now have five anchor points available to run this ferry. The original anchor points that showed up after breakup, there were only two and that's not significant enough to have the ferry run safely for the general public.

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, the Minister just mentioned that the water level is too high at this time. I'm not sure who the Minister is getting his information from because I get this from the people that live in Fort McPherson that have traditional knowledge in that area. There's nothing wrong with the water level right now. Right now the landing should be in and you know if the inspections are complete there's no reason why the ferry is not in. I'd like to ask the Minister, when will the service begin on the Peel River ferry?

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As I alluded, there's five anchor points now available and as of today the slipways are being prepped and the timbers are being installed to launch the ferry. As of this evening, we plan on having the ferry into the Peel system and with more seaworthiness testing we're hoping to have the ferry service in operation by late Wednesday, early Thursday morning.

Question 125-18(2): Delayed Spring Ferry Service In Mackenzie Delta
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nunakput.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I spoke earlier on the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, and my questions are for the honourable Premier McLeod. My question is: has the GNWT here received any formal correspondence from the federal government respecting its announcement to the UN declaration? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Honourable Premier.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you. Mr. Speaker. The Government of the Northwest Territories received notice from the federal government that the Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs would be making an announcement during the United Nation's Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues in New York City regarding its position on UNDRA. The Government of the Northwest Territories, like all other jurisdictions, was not made aware of what that announcement would be until the announcement was made by the Minister in New York. Understanding the implications of Canada's recent full endorsement of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People will require further consideration and engagement with Canada.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

The Premier answered partial of my second questions. Does the GNWT have a formal position on the UN declaration or does it plan to develop one?

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

UNDRA is an important document that recognizes, among other things, the right of Indigenous people to maintain and strengthen their own institutions, cultures, and traditions. In 2008, UNDRA was endorsed through a motion of our Legislative Assembly. The Government of Canada’s recent adoption of UNDRA in accordance with Canada's laws and Constitution is an encouraging and tangible demonstration of the federal government's renewed commitment to Canada's Aboriginal people. Currently Canada, through Section 35 of the Constitution, has a very robust framework for the protection of Aboriginal rights. Fully adopting and implementing UNDRA requires careful consideration of its application within Canada's constitutional framework.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

May 31st, 2016

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

My final question is: what is the GNWT doing to ensure that the interests of its northern Aboriginal residents are being represented as the federal government moves to adopt and implement the UN declaration?

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, the Government of the Northwest Territories will continue to work with the federal government and Aboriginal governments to further their promotion and protection of Aboriginal and treaty rights. This includes collaborating and fostering government-to-government relationships with Aboriginal governments as well as negotiating and implementing Aboriginal resource and self-governments that respect, promote, and protect the rights and freedoms of Aboriginal peoples as highlighted in the priorities and ministerial mandates of the 18thLegislative Assembly. The successful conclusion of modern treaties and self-government agreements can be seen as the ultimate expression of free prior and informed consent among partners.

Question 126-18(2): United Nations Declaration On The Rights Of Indigenous Peoples
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Deh Cho.

Question 127-18(2): Condition Of Hay River Reserve Access Road
Oral Questions

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, earlier I spoke about the very bad condition of the road, the access road, from the junction of the Pine Point/Fort Smith highway to the Hay River Reserve. We all understand that jurisdiction is about sorting out who's responsible for what in terms of the context of this road. In that exercise there's negotiation that goes on. Within that party there's usually the GNWT, the federal government, and in this instance is the K'atlodeeche First Nation. The other element to this is that sometimes we get bogged down by red tape and it stops us from doing meaningful things for people at the end of the day. The biggest people that are affected by the bad condition of the road are the motorists and at the same time, the residents of the K'atlodeeche First Nation. So my question to the Minister is: am I correct in my understanding that jurisdictional issues need to be resolved before repairs to the Hay River Reserve access road can get under way? Mahsi.