This is page numbers 1279 - 1309 of the Hansard for the 12th Assembly, 7th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was education.

Topics

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Kivallivik -- Aivilik, sorry -- is seeking unanimous consent to conclude her statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mrs. Thompson.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

Manitok Thompson Aivilik

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In Ottawa, the people of the north are represented in the ruling Liberal party by two outstanding aboriginal people, Mr. Jack Anawak and the Honourable Ethel Blondin-Andrew. These two people are, unfortunately, linked to the concept of party discipline. Ms. Blondin-Andrew and Mr. Anawak are supposed to subject their feelings, and those of their constituents, to the greater political will of their party and the rest of urban Canada.

Mr. Speaker, this issue is too important to northerners for our two elected representatives to toe the party line and vote in the affirmative. They must come out and support the people they represent, regardless of the consequences. They have no alternative. The electorate will not forgive or forget such an insult to their way of life.

In closing, Mr. Speaker, I quote from an article in yesterday's Toronto Star in which Ms. Blondin-Andrew said on the issue of her voting on the gun control bill that, "A person can't die on every hill. You have to pick the hill you're going to die on, but the people in my riding are telling me this is my hill." This quote, Mr. Speaker, is twofold. If Mrs. Blondin-Andrew chooses to vote for her party, she risks losing her seat in the next federal election. If she chooses to truly represent her constituents and vote against the bill, she risks alienating herself from her party.

Obviously, Mr. Speaker, this is not an easy decision for our MPs to make, but they must remember that they were elected to be our voice in Ottawa and that voice, Mr. Speaker, is loud and clear. I trust they will make the right decision for the people by voting against Bill C-68. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

An Hon. Member

Hear! Hear!

---Applause

Position Of NWT Mps On Bill C-68
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Ms. Mike.

Preparation Of Nwt-wide Organizations For Division
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

Rebecca Mike Baffin Central

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As we enter into our discussions and deliberations on Bill 25, Education Act, it makes me think about planning for education in Nunavut in preparation for 1999. In addition to my Member's statement last week about the resolutions made in Gjoa Haven by Nunavut leaders, I'm concerned about what our future holds for our teachers in the east.

As the Government of the Northwest Territories plans for division of its resources, assets and liabilities, it must be recognized that there are a variety of organizations that may also need to plan for an equitable split of their resources between east and west. As most Members are aware, teachers in the north belong to the NWT Teachers' Association. Over one-third of the members of the NWT Teachers' Association reside in Nunavut. Should it be decided that the teachers not be represented by the same association in the east as in the west, due consideration must be given to a process for the division of resources and assets.

It is crucial that organizations that are NWT-wide begin to address these questions immediately, in order to adequately prepare for life after Nunavut. Teachers' representation is just one area that we must be aware of, Mr. Speaker, where a body established by statute may take on new forms in preparation for or after division of the territories. In our haste to plan for division of government assets, liabilities and entities, we must not lose sight of those bodies and organizations that are also facing the same decisions and challenges. As much as possible, this government must be committed to assist in the process for all northerners. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Preparation Of Nwt-wide Organizations For Division
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1281

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Thank you, Ms. Mike. Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Lewis.

Snare River Hydro Project
Item 3: Members' Statements

June 13th, 1995

Page 1281

Brian Lewis Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This afternoon, Mr. Speaker, Mr. Morin made a Minister's statement about using our own people and our own resources to solve our own problems. My statement this afternoon, Mr. Speaker, is on a similar theme.

Last Saturday, Mr. Speaker, I joined people from the Power Corporation, utility and mining companies, as well as Dogrib leaders on a visit to the Snare River hydro project. Mr. Whitford already referred to this visit yesterday. It was meaningful for him because he had been there early in his career with the Power Corporation 30 years ago. The visit was meaningful for me too, Mr. Speaker, because I've had a lifelong interest in northern responsible government and northern self-sufficiency.

Mr. Speaker, I'm delighted to see the development of our hydro potential. Although there will always be critics of man's attempts to harness the forces of nature, I believe hydro is one of the most responsible ways of generating power. It is clean and sustainable. The future of Yellowknife and the Dogrib people, although many Yellowknifers don't realize it yet, are very closely connected. The Dogrib own much of the land and will have a major say in development in the Yellowknife region. The Snare hydro project is exciting, Mr. Speaker. It's not huge or overwhelming, you can understand it, and it is much like others throughout the world which are a little bit overwhelming to the average individual.

The Snare project was begun over 40 years ago. We have learned from the experience. Now as the city of Yellowknife enjoys rapid growth and we seem on the verge of increased industrial activity in the region, it is nice to see the Dogrib people and the various companies planning to meet our future energy needs. It's nice to see groups working in harmony on such an important project. Soon, hopefully, Yellowknife will no longer be dependent on imported diesel to generate power. It's a perfect example of import replacement, which we all agree is one of the keys to our future economic well-being.

Using our own resources and our own people is the major road to economic self-sufficiency.

I was told over the weekend, Mr. Speaker, that we are in danger of losing the kind of harmony that we need to solve all our problems, but this is one example of where we are succeeding. Thank you.

---Applause

Snare River Hydro Project
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Item 3, Members' statements. Mr. Koe.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

Fred Koe Inuvik

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, on Sunday, June 11th, I had the privilege and honour to attend the grand opening ceremonies of the new Western Arctic Regional Visitors' Centre which is located in Inuvik. It was a beautiful day in Inuvik with over 300 people in attendance to enjoy the ceremony, the entertainment and the feasting. There are many people and many organizations to thank and I would like to take this opportunity to do this.

First of all, I would like to thank Minister Todd and all the previous Ministers of Economic Development and Cabinets for supporting this worthy project. I say Ministers and Cabinets because this project has been in the planning and development stages for a long time. I know because when I was regional superintendent for the department in 1987, we started talks on the development of this project.

People say that all good things take time and from the building that is there now, it looks like it has been done right. I would also like to thank the various deputy ministers, the assistant deputy ministers and other departmental staff who have been involved in this project. Special mention should be made of John Cournoyea, who I believe has been the only consistent player in this project from day one. John is the manager for parks and visitor services in the Inuvik region.

People in Inuvik, especially the Inuvialuit and Gwich'in organizations, have played key roles in this project. They formed a joint venture to construct this building using Tetlit'zheh Construction Limited as a general contractor. The themes and displays which are in and around the building will depict the Inuvialuit and Gwich'in lifestyles and history. The display designers also deserve credit for a job well done.

I would also like to thank all the people who helped make this special day a success. Mr. Speaker, I seek consent to continue my statement.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Inuvik is seeking unanimous consent to conclude his statement. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Conclude your statement, Mr. Koe.

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

Fred Koe Inuvik

Qujannamiik, Mr. Speaker. The people I would like to thank are the weathermen, for the good day we had; Lloyd Binder and his staff from Economic Development and Tourism; Billy Day and the Inuvik Community Corporation; Willard Hagen and the Gwich'in Tribal Council; the elders and youth who participated in the ribbon-cutting ceremonies; the people who prepared the food; Andrea Camerand and the staff of the visitors' centre; Mike Tryon and members of the Western Arctic Tourism Association; the Inuvik Delta drummers and dancers; Ruby McLeod's East Three Wheelers; and, the Inuvik Choral and Theatrical Society. I would also like to thank Premier Cournoyea for attending and participating in the opening ceremonies.

I would like to give special mention also to Gordie Campbell for making the dedication to the bush pilots of the Beaufort/Delta area. One of the displays outside of the centre is a real airplane. I believe it is a Cessna 170A airplane, which was owned and operated by Freddy Carmichael of Reindeer Air Services. This airplane is mounted on a swivel and anchored so that the plane can move into whatever direction the wind is blowing. It is something to see. Congratulations go to all the bush pilots who were pioneers in aviation and helped to develop the north.

For everyone else whom I did not mention today, I, on behalf of the people of Inuvik and region, wish to congratulate you on a job well done and a visitors' centre which we should all be proud of. Mahsi.

---Applause

Opening Of Regional Visitors' Centre In Inuvik
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

Mr. Allooloo.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1282

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today to talk about the challenges we face as northern people and safety on the land. This is a great time of year to be out on the land. At least back home, the fish are running. The char are going out to see. Snow geese are nesting. Murres and ducks are coming back to nest on the cliffs. The young seals are sunbathing on the ice and people are whale hunting out on the floe. School is out in most of the communities and families are heading out in spring and summer camps.

Unfortunately, Mr. Speaker, too many accidents are happening every year that could be avoided. Mr. Speaker, I would like to caution everyone to be careful while enjoying the traditional activities out on the land and outdoors, particularly at this time of year when the weather can be deceiving. It can be a warm and sunny day, but the water is extremely cold. Hypothermia can happen very quickly, as I found out last weekend when I was out in my kayak. Most of the time, Mr. Speaker, I can get up again. But I was shocked to discover how cold the water is when you tip over. My body went numb. Thankfully, I was wearing a lifejacket and I was travelling with experienced paddlers who rescued me before I was overcome by the cold water. It took the rest of the day for my body to warm itself.

Accidents can be prevented, Mr. Speaker, if people take time to prepare before heading out. People must remember to let other people know where they are going and when they expect to return. Travellers on the land must learn to anticipate dangerous situations and avoid them at all costs. Back home when hunting along the floe, the ice sometimes breaks off. The hunters find themselves...Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

The Speaker Samuel Gargan

The Member for Amittuq is seeking unanimous consent. Are there any nays? There are no nays. Please proceed, Mr. Allooloo.

Member's Statement Regarding On-the-land Safety Practices
Item 3: Members' Statements

Page 1283

Titus Allooloo Amittuq

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Back home when hunting along the floe, the ice sometimes breaks off. The hunters find themselves adrift on the ocean. An experienced hunter knows exactly what to do in this situation. Traditional knowledge will tell you to avoid the situation that could leave you adrift in the Arctic Ocean. An experienced person or hunter could be in great danger in this situation.

Mr. Speaker, being on the land will always involve a certain amount of danger, but if we draw upon the knowledge of our elders, who have been here longer than we have, as well as taking advantage of new technology that can be found today, we and our families will enjoy many accident-free days on the land, whether that be an overnight camping trip or pursuing traditional lifestyles many miles away from our home community. I wish those people who are going out on the land and doing their traditional activities a very successful trip. Thank you.

---Applause