This is page numbers 1621 – 1660 of the Hansard for the 17th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was communities.

Topics

Territorial Respite Care Program
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Ms. Bisaro. The honourable Member for Yellowknife Centre, Mr. Hawkins.

Barren Ground Caribou
Members’ Statements

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I raise today’s Member’s statement as an opportunity to respond to the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources Minister’s statement, which is an update on the NWT barren ground caribou numbers.

First off, I want to thank the Minister for providing the House a small update. I think it’s a snapshot of our particular situation, but it is disappointing to hear the facts, that we still have a number of herds missing, without the details.

He points out, quite clearly, that the Bluenose-East and the Porcupine numbers, due to weather, we were not able to get clear and accurate numbers. So in other words, we couldn’t operate with that.

There is some good news. I want to thank the Minister for being at least the messenger of good news that the Cape Bathurst herd and the Bluenose-West are increasing and, predictably, we are very hopeful that the Bluenose-East at 100,000 continues to show strong numbers. That now starts to open up the question of what are we going to do with these particular numbers.

Many of the outfitters as well as resident hunters and I, do hear as well from Aboriginal rights holders, who ask themselves from time to time what numbers are we actually working towards. It seems to be shifting and we need clear transparency on these particular numbers. If we are going to open up the harvest one day and expand the harvest to what it was at one time, we need to understand what we are working towards.

I find it disappointing that we don’t have any indication in the Minister’s statement as to how we will continue to work with industry that is being mothballed as we speak. Outfitters have certainly paid a pound of flesh as they’ve waited patiently for the outfitting industry to once again return to its

great excitement. We all know that the outfitters provided great employment; we had an excellent reputation in the Northwest Territories to provide opportunities. Some of the meat, in many cases that was provided, was given to the small communities and those who needed it, and let us not forget about the taxation and the millions of dollars that was brought into the Northwest Territories.

The primary concerns are in where are we going. We’ve got some of these numbers, not all, I respect that that may not have been possible, but where are we going with these particular numbers? Full transparency is the issue on this one, so when the outfitters look forward to the future, they know where they’re going. We cannot continue this attitude of the 12th of never as our motto of one day

we will open the outfitting opportunities, one day resident hunters will hunt.

If the Minister could provide the House with real numbers, we all know what we’re in together fighting for. Thank you.

Barren Ground Caribou
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Hawkins. The Member for Hay River South, Mrs. Groenewegen.

Remembrance Day
Members’ Statements

Jane Groenewegen Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Sunday is Remembrance Day and I’d like to take this opportunity to speak just a little bit about the veterans, starting with the veterans and the knowledge of war that I grew up with as a child.

My grandfather, Sylvanus John Vivian Cann, volunteered to serve in the First World War when he was 28 years of age. He was already married and had three small daughters. He went off to World War I, and in later years, when you have a grandfather that wore a great big, long, wide band of metal, you’re going to hear a few war stories.

I find it interesting that my grandfather’s recollections of his time in the trenches on the front lines in the First World War always included his remembrance of serving with Aboriginal soldiers, First Nations soldiers that he served with. Now, he was no dummy, because when you’re crawling around in trenches, who do you want to have with you? People who have the expertise and the knowledge of the land and can see and hear the signs, and he often told us the stories of the acute skills and how much he appreciated that time of service.

Later, when World War II broke out, his two sons, my two uncles, Charles Stuart Cann and Thomas Bruce Cann, both went off to the Second World War and went to Europe as very, very young men. My Uncle Stuart is buried in France someplace and my Uncle Bruce did come home, but he came home very troubled, very shell shocked and lived a

life where as kids we didn’t really know what was wrong with Uncle Bruce, but he would break into tears or he was shell shocked from the war and we didn’t know that as kids. The happy news for Uncle Bruce was he had met a beautiful, sophisticated Dutch widow when he picked up a little girl off the streets of Holland and took her home to her mother. My Aunt Susan ultimately came to Canada and married my Uncle Bruce, and they had a wonderful family and a wonderful life together.

My own father, who served in the British Army from 1940 to 1947 and immigrated to Canada, met my mother there, and I’m very proud of my father’s war service as well. Then coming to Hay River and meeting the many, many wonderful northern veterans who we got to know, many of whom by now have passed away, but as Remembrance Day comes upon us this Sunday, may we just say we will remember them. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Remembrance Day
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mrs. Groenewegen. The Member for Tu Nedhe. Mr. Beaulieu.

Passing Of Georgina Biscaye
Members’ Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe

Mahsi Cho, Mr. Speaker… [English translation not provided.]

Today I would like to pay tribute to the late Georgina Biscaye of Fort Resolution. A funeral service was held in her memory yesterday.

Georgina was born June 13, 1961, in Rocher River. Her family moved and settled in Fort Resolution when she was seven years old. Georgina always had fond memories of Rocher River and never forgot where she was born and was proud to remind others.

Georgina passed away surrounded by her family on Thursday, November 1, 2012, at Stanton Territorial Hospital. Georgina was 51 years old.

Georgina discovered she had cancer on April 12th ,

shortly after her partner and husband, the late Alphonse King, was detected with cancer. They both had lung cancer. Although, finding out they both had cancer, they decided not to let their illness get them down, and instead both chose to embrace and make the best of their medical conditions. Georgina and Alphonse were both hospitalized – she in Edmonton, he in Yellowknife – when he passed away on June 8th .

Georgina was a strong-willed Dene woman who always spoke her mind and got her point across. She got along well with others and had a great sense of humour. She had no problem accepting constructive criticism and was always willing to lend a helping hand to those in need. Georgina was definitely a family caregiver. She always took care of her parents until her father died, and right up until she got sick she took care of her mother.

Georgina’s nieces and nephews called her Auntie Mom.

Georgina preferred to speak Chipewyan and only spoke English when she had to. She was committed to her language and culture, and it was a big part of who she was. She worked really hard to maintain this area of her life. Georgina was passionate about being involved in the preservation and revitalization of the Chipewyan language. She was confirmed to the Aboriginal Languages Revitalization Board and the Official Languages Board as a Chipewyan representative on June 20, 2011. She was nominated as the chair of the Aboriginal Languages Revitalization Board on February 17, 2011.

I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Passing Of Georgina Biscaye
Members’ Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe

Georgina was very active in the promotion of her language through her work. Until recently, Georgina worked as the Akaitcho Chipewyan regional language coordinator with the Akaitcho Territorial Government and prior to that she worked as a Chipewyan language coordinator for the Deninu Ku’e First Nation. Minister Jackson Lafferty acknowledges her work in the languages area.

Georgina is survived by her mother, Therese; her sisters, Anne, Sabet, Julie, Violet and Gloria; her daughter, Lacey; granddaughter, Chase; and numerous nieces and nephews, cousins, and many, many friends. My sincerest condolences go out to Georgina’s mother, five sisters, daughter, grandson, nieces, nephews and many friends.

Passing Of Georgina Biscaye
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. The honourable Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, Mr. Robert McLeod.

Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient Mr. Louie Goose
Members’ Statements

November 6th, 2012

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This past Friday in Winnipeg, a well-known NWT musician – and, I have to add, a constituent of Inuvik Twin Lakes – Mr. Louie Goose was honoured by the Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

---Applause

People may not hear it, but there are some folks in here singing “40 Days” right now.

---Laughter

Louie was taught at an early age by his mother, and he spoke during an interview about as he was growing up chording at some of the old-time dances

for many of the old-time fiddle players who were always playing all night for the dances. He spoke about his early start with a band called the Deltanaires. He played lead guitar in this band and he spoke about how he had to start singing one day because their lead singer was resting, as he put it. I think that’s the politically correct term for passed out.

---Laughter

For well over 40 years Louie has been entertaining the residents of the Beaufort-Delta, and anyone that may have lived or attended school during that time can recall listening and dancing to the music from Louie’s band.

He started work with CBC for a while, for a few years, and along with Mr. Saturday Night Request Show, Mr. Les Carpenter and Roger Gruben and the late Willie Gordon who hosted the well-renowned Moms Show, they were, in my opinion, probably the best radio personalities the North has ever had or will ever have.

Louie’s musical influence is particularly evident as his daughter Leanne is starting to carve out a musical career of her own, with multiple nominations from the Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards. She did a moving introduction at the awards to, as she put it, her hero.

I ask Members today to join me in congratulating Mr. Louie Goose on receiving the National Lifetime Achievement Award from the Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards committee. This is a well-deserved award for a well-deserving individual, Mr. 40 Days, Louie Goose.

Aboriginal People’s Choice Music Awards Lifetime Achievement Award Recipient Mr. Louie Goose
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. The honourable Member for Mackenzie Delta, Mr. Blake.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I’d like to recognize the former Member for Mackenzie Delta Mr. David Krutko, and also the former Member for Range Lake Mrs. Sandy Lee.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Blake. The honourable Member for Range Lake, Mr. Dolynny.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Daryl Dolynny Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to rise and welcome to the House again our esteemed colleague Mr. Krutko and former MLA, former Minister and Range Lake resident Ms. Sandy Lee.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackie Jacobson

Thank you, Mr. Dolynny. The honourable Premier, Mr. McLeod.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Yellowknife South

Bob McLeod Premier

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I’d like to recognize three Pages from Yellowknife South: Megan Vu, Benjamin McGregor, Latetia Hammond. I would like to thank them for their good

work, and also thank all the Pages that are here today.