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This Hansard is the unedited transcript and will be replaced by the final copy soon (generally within 5 business days). In the meantime, direct quotes should not be used, when the final is published it will seamlessly replace this unedited copy and any existing links should still work.

This is from the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

It is very clear to me. The Public Utilities Board is an independent regulator, but the Public Utilities Board funding is voted on by the Legislative Assembly, through the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs' main estimates. The commitment that the Member is referring to, Commitment 1.4.6 on net metering, falls to the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs.

With regards to who is leading the overall coordination of energy policy-making for the Government of the Northwest Territories, this is a corporate responsibility led by Cabinet with input from Regular Members, Aboriginal government communities, stakeholders, interest groups, and the general public.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

The Premier has laid that out clear. I know for a fact that subsection 14 of the Public Utilities Act gives this government the authority to issue direction to the Public Utilities Board. It is not just a funding issue. There is direct policy that can be made, and I sit on the Standing Committee of Economic Development and Environment, and we do not know what is going into these policy decisions. In fact, the last one was dropped on us with little notice.

If policy direction and development is not being shared with Regular Members, and we have to deal with five separate Ministers on various aspects of energy in the Northwest Territories, how is the Premier planning to work with us effectively to guide the Energy Strategy and allow us to have full input to make sure this works for Northerners?

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

All Members of this House should have input into the development of public policy. We have procedures and process conventions to ensure that all policy direction issued to the PUB has been shared with committees and has been made public, as well as any future policy direction to the PUB, including the draft Energy Strategy.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just want to again remind the Premier that, over the life of this government in the last two years, any policy direction to the Public Utilities Board has been shared with standing committees after the fact. We have not been allowed to provide input into these policy decisions. Will the Premier commit to this side of the House today to ensure that the voices of the standing committees and the Regular Members are included before policy direction is given to the Public Utilities Board? Thank you.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Cabinet has directed the Public Utilities Board to consider the following principles when assessing net metering rates: costs should be transparent; costs should be borne by the customers; government customers should not be eligible for net metering; implementation criteria should provide certainty of benefits; and the capacity for individual systems taking part in net metering should be no greater than 15 kilowatts to ensure all residents and businesses should be ensured an opportunity to participate in the program. We will follow convention as per the protocol agreement to make sure that all Members are made aware. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

October 20th, 2017

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, at the midpoint of this Assembly, 33 bills have been passed, compared to 52 in the 17th Assembly after two years. My question for the Premier is: why is the pace of legislative change so slow in this Assembly? Mahsi.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We are not a factory. We operate in a Legislative Assembly. Legislative proposals and draft bills before Cabinet are confidential documents which I cannot speak to, but we have a significant number of initiatives making their way through the system for introduction in the remaining two years. We had a slow start in year one with respect to introducing legislation due to a number of factors, the late election, and the focus on the development of the mandates by this House, but in year two, we are definitely picking up speed, Mr. Speaker.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

The evidence just does not support what the Premier has said there. We are not picking up speed. We are about to start a three-and-a-half-month recess with one bill to contemplate. One bill. It is not as if this Assembly started from scratch with legislative proposals. In the transition report, there was a section about completing devolution and implementing a made-in-the-North regulatory system. That was available more than two years ago when the Premier was Premier. Why is it taking the government so long to bring this legislation forward for review?

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Legislation can take a long time to develop, and we have a number of very large initiatives under way to bring forward in the latter two years of this Assembly. The revised mandate of the Government of the Northwest Territories identifies 14 larger pieces of legislation for introduction in the 18th Legislative Assembly that we have been working very hard on.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I wonder if part of the reason for the slowness is whether there is a lack of capacity among the legislative drafters to produce all the legislation that we have contemplated pursuing during this 18th Assembly. Is capacity the issue?

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

At the rise of the House today, we expect that the 18th Legislative Assembly will have passed an additional three financial bills. As the Member indicated, this brings the total number of bills passed by this Legislative Assembly to 36, with another bill introduced and before special committee for review. In past investigations, we have determined that capacity is not an issue, and we will undertake to review that again to ensure that is not the case.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.