This is page numbers 2821 - 2866 of the Hansard for the 16th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was agreed.

Topics

26th Annual K’amba Carnival On The Hay River Reserve
Members’ Statements

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Item 4, reports of standing and special committees. Item 5, returns to oral questions. Item 6, recognition of visitors in the gallery. The honourable Member for Thebacha, Mr. Miltenberger.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

March 5th, 2009

Michael Miltenberger Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It gives me great pleasure to recognize one of my brothers, the mayor from Hay River, His Worship Jean-Marc Miltenberger.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Miltenberger. The honourable Member for Nahendeh, Mr. Menicoche.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Kevin A. Menicoche Nahendeh

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. I’d like to recognize Mr. Patrick Scott, a former resident of Nahendeh. Welcome to the gallery. Mahsi.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Menicoche. I’d like to welcome everyone in the gallery today. I hope you’re enjoying the proceedings. Item 7, acknowledgements.

Acknowledgement 5-16(3): 90th Birthday Of Ken Hunt
Acknowledgements

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Colleagues, it gives me great pleasure today to acknowledge a long-time Northerner, a friend and a constituent, Mr. Ken Hunt, who is celebrating his 90th birthday today.

Ken moved to the North with the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1942 and settled in Clyde River. Ken’s last posting with the Hudson’s Bay Company was in Fort Vermillion in 1954. Ken married his late wife, Peggy, in 1947, and they moved to Hay River in 1955. Ken was employed as a fisheries officer for many years. Together, Ken and Peggy raised their four children in Hay River. Ken cherishes his 11 grandchildren and he is a great-grandfather to 12, with three of his great-grandchildren being born in Hay River.

Ken has been a proud member of the Hay River Fire Department since 1968. He is a life member of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 250, and Ken was an avid curler for many years.

Ken’s family is hosting a birthday party for him this evening at the Hay River Fire Hall and I am sorry

that I am unable to attend and share a piece of cake with him. Colleagues, I ask you all to join me in wishing Ken all the best on his way to 100.

---Applause

Item 8, oral questions. The honourable Member for Nahendeh, Mr. Menicoche.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Kevin A. Menicoche Nahendeh

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Earlier in my Member’s statement I spoke about the frustration of the Dehcho and the frustration of the leadership in negotiating their Dehcho Process with the federal government. Also, they share frustration for our government, too, because they’ve seemingly taken sides with the federal government.

I’d like to ask Mr. Premier, will this government commit to work and support the Dehcho as they desire to move forward with their Dehcho Process? Mahsi.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Menicoche. The honourable Premier, Mr. Roland.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Floyd Roland Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Dehcho Process has been underway for quite a number of years and the position has been put out there and discussed quite a number of times. The Government of the Northwest Territories remains committed to helping where we can with trying to come to conclusion in this area. The self-government mandate is one that is established by the federal government when they structure the frameworks. We’re involved in a number of areas when it comes to program services and some land issues. We continue to work with the Dehcho First Nations in the areas that were at the negotiation table, but we also work with the communities involved in that process as they have their discussions as well with the federal government. Thank you.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Kevin A. Menicoche Nahendeh

In my Member’s statement I spoke about our government conferring with the federal government. I am aware that when the federal Minister of INAC seeks advice, that they often call our government. What I’d like to ask the Premier, Mr. Speaker, is when that happens, he’s going to have to acknowledge that the Dehcho are our people, our people of our Northwest Territories, as well, and that he has to show them support and not just listen to the federal side of the equation. With that, Mr. Speaker, will this government commit to this House and to the people of the Northwest

Territories that they will support the Dehcho First Nations in working for a balanced and fair Dehcho land use plan which places the highest priority on protecting watersheds and ecological sensitive areas? Mahsi.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Floyd Roland Inuvik Boot Lake

I’m not sure if the Member’s trying to have me speak to establishing new mandates with the Government of the Northwest Territories. The balance that we bring to the table is the fact that there is an existing land claims self-government discussions that have happened. There are quite a number of them going on. There are models that have been agreed to in the past and past mandates established that have not been changed. In fact, as time has evolved, that is one of the reasons why one of the departments I work with, Aboriginal Affairs and Intergovernmental Relations, is looking at reviewing those mandates and working with Members on those pieces. We have to come to the table looking at the, as the Member said, for the best interests of the people of the Northwest Territories and making sure we have a workable system for the people of the Northwest Territories after all the self-government tables have been discussed and concluded. At times that means we differ from different regions or communities on their initiatives. But for the interest of all the people, we try to come to the table with a balanced approach that would mean the agreements can be implemented and that the regions and communities have the capacity to fulfill what has been negotiated.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Kevin A. Menicoche Nahendeh

I guess the perception of our government that is out there, and I would just like to quote really quickly, is that when one of the participants in our leadership meeting in Fort Simpson last week said, “I don’t like the federal government, and the territorial government is right there behind them.” That’s a frustration that they are seeing with the Dehcho Process negotiations. That’s how they see our government. I’d like to ask the Premier once again, will the government change their mindset about not only helping the federal government, but it’s time to start helping the Dehcho people and the Dehcho Process?

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Floyd Roland Inuvik Boot Lake

The area that we’ve been involved with in a number of cases, and yes, we’ve heard that in the past, and even at some of the meetings that are held from time to time, about our position. The simple fact is this government has taken a different approach. We’re looking at the big picture. We’re looking at what the possibilities in the North can mean when we have clarity, when it comes to self-government discussions and trying to help bring those to conclusion. That’s why we’ve established the regional leaders meeting tables and in fact, through those tables have begun the joint work on the Land Use Management Plan as well as the Water Strategy, through those tables. In fact,

that is again where we shared our information around the self-government financing issue. So we’re working with the aboriginal governments across the Northwest Territories to come with a common front from a northern perspective so that we can approach the federal government so that they can see how we want it to work in the Northwest Territories. So we are working with the First Nations and aboriginal governments in the Northwest Territories to come up with a common approach when it comes to engaging the federal government.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Roland. Final supplementary, Mr. Menicoche.

Question 260-16(3): Dehcho Process
Oral Questions

Kevin A. Menicoche Nahendeh

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. That’s exactly the point I’m getting at. For this government to indicate that they’re sincere, they have to be working with the Dehcho leadership and believe in the Dehcho process as well. This government has to step up to the plate. We’re going to have to see this process begin on a fair and reasonable rate. So I’d like to ask, will this government commit to continue to increase their working relationship with the Dehcho and assist them beginning their Dehcho negotiations process?