This is page numbers 4463 - 4502 of the Hansard for the 16th Assembly, 4th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was health.

Topics

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Norman Yakeleya Sahtu

Mr. Speaker, the Minister did talk about the Labour Market Agreement. Also in the binder that I’ve been reading, the department is going to be developing a new framework, multi-year annual plans and program guidelines. I want to ask the Minister in terms of this initiative going forward in terms of involving the people in the Sahtu. Would he involve the people in the Sahtu in terms of going forward to have training programs in place, implemented and ready to go within the life of this government for the young people in the Sahtu region?

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Jackson Lafferty Monfwi

Mr. Speaker, by all means. Those are consultations that we need to have. We do have representatives at the regional levels; not just Sahtu region but other regions. We depend on their expertise because they’re fully aware of the community needs, the community programming, and what’s needed, what’s lacking. So those are areas that we need to have continuous consultation and dialogue with the Sahtu region.

Mr. Speaker, yes, we will have a dialogue with them. Mahsi.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Norman Yakeleya Sahtu

Mr. Speaker, as I said in my statement, we have a high population of youth, young people under 25. It’s actually 45 percent of our population in the Sahtu that needs some attention. I want to ask the Minister in terms of helping the students in our regions, in our communities, to help them get into Aurora College programs in our communities under the Apprenticeship Training Program and working with them in terms of putting this Labour Market Agreement together so they could see people be productive members of society and to their communities.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Jackson Lafferty Monfwi

Mr. Speaker, yes, we’ll definitely do what we can as a department, but I would encourage the Member to assist, as well, identifying those organizations that would pick up these apprentices. It’s almost as challenging a task for us as a department to seek out those organizations that are willing to take on these apprentices, but we’ll do what we can to train those individuals and provide subsidies for them to be trained as an apprentice. But at the same time, if the Member can assist in this area, that will be very helpful as well. Mahsi.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Lafferty. Final supplementary, Mr. Yakeleya.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Norman Yakeleya Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Minister is asking if I can assist. I can certainly do that, Mr. Speaker, in terms of going forward with putting programs in place for young people. I can do this through the request from myself in terms of

also the leader from Fort Good Hope in terms of having a Sahtu education symposium where part of this discussion can be on the agenda in terms of going forward, and actually have other leaders to assist to make sure we get training on the ground for the people in the Sahtu.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

Jackson Lafferty Monfwi

I can commit to the Member that I am willing to work with them on this symposium that he’s referring to. He did bring that to my attention and I believe that’s going forward. I told him, if we’re invited, we’ll certainly be part of that ongoing process. Mahsi.

Question 392-16(4): Education And Training Programs For Young People In The Sahtu
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Lafferty. The honourable Member for Yellowknife Centre, Mr. Hawkins.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

February 24th, 2010

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in my Member’s statement today I talked about the relationship of this House and how we propose ideas and sometimes, if not most of the time, we feel like they get shot down. Mr. Speaker, I am going to have questions for the Premier, who I think is best suited for this type of question.

Mr. Speaker, I try to be a stalwart defender of consensus government, but sometimes, if not most of the time, it feels like it’s a one-way valve. I would like to ask the Premier what he does to advocate particular issues on our behalf when we raise them such as new schools or, sorry, we want schools repaired, we want nurses in our health centres. What does he do as a Cabinet policy to help us advocate those issues with those types of boards that are either duly elected or duly appointed? Thank you.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Hawkins. The honourable Premier, Mr. Roland.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

Inuvik Boot Lake

Floyd Roland Premier

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We do many things when we advocate on behalf of the Assembly Members, as well as trying to find the balance with the direction that the boards and agencies that deliver the core of our services across the Northwest Territories. So we get involved with the Ministers and the departments to find out where things are sitting and where, for example, strategic plans are put in place or where their capital program is, and we sit down with the expertise from departments and the authorities to make that happen. Believe me, Mr. Speaker, this is all in process of trying to keep the system flowing with the fixed budgets we have to operate in. So it’s challenging to come up with all of the right pieces.

I am sure Ms Lee would love to, for example, have a nurse in every community. We’d love to have a high school in every community, but we are challenged with a budget and our legislation in

place around our boards and agencies that are in place. In fact, we did try to do some work in that area and we’ve since halted that area to look at just how we try to do things and clean up some of our legislation. So we’re challenged in those areas, but I continue to work with the Ministers and their boards and agencies at times to try to come up with solutions that would work for us. Thank you.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

I come to work just like many of my colleagues and have the attitude of can-do, but it seems like the response from Cabinet is can’t-do. As much as they like to think that they can, most of the responses from them are we can’t. This is why we can’t. The other thing is when it comes to budget money, it seems like they’ve got a big bag of money and then they give us these little scraps to fight over for community issues. Mr. Speaker, the issue comes down to the response of how can we help. Mr. Speaker, is there any type of policy from the Cabinet position about when an MLA raises a particular issue, that the Ministers will help take on and advocate that issue to the boards to make sure they are properly empowered to invoke these ideas? Thank you.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

Inuvik Boot Lake

Floyd Roland Premier

The process we’re involved with and the method of delivery we have in the Northwest Territories, the legislation we operate under, drives to a large degree just the work we can do for the people of the Northwest Territories with a fixed budget. I don’t go in the back room at night and start searching out the money to pay for all of the demands. The demands far outweigh the resources we have available as the Government of the Northwest Territories. So our challenge as Members of the Legislative Assembly as we are through this budget process is do what we can do with what’s available and try to plan out the rest of it as we go forward.

Let’s say the 16th Legislative Assembly, Mr.

Speaker, has done some big changes in the way we do business. Rural and remote communities, for example, we are starting to focus on how we deliver those services; the Foundation for Change that the Minister of Health and Social Services is working on. We are talking about delivery of programs and services that will keep us sustainable. We can no longer keep making the requests without also giving us the opportunity to find the resources. We should say that for every Member that decides to make a request, they should also attach a revenue source for that so we can deliver what’s expected of us. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

Robert Hawkins Yellowknife Centre

I want to thank the Premier for highlighting all of Cabinet’s priorities and the issue I raised last week like Mildred Hall, Sisson’s needs renovations and those are the priorities of those school boards. As my colleagues Mr. Krutko and Mr. Menicoche have said, priorities of communities saying they want health nurses. Mr. Speaker, these

are priorities that are found, they’re born, developed and brought forward from the communities to this Legislature. Those are the issues. How do we make them priorities of this House? Because Members here are trying to raise priorities in our communities and sometimes, if not most of the time, we don’t see them really reflected in the Cabinet’s budget. Thank you.

Question 393-16(4): Response To Concerns Raised By Regular Members
Oral Questions

Inuvik Boot Lake

Floyd Roland Premier

This government is very open to input as we develop the business plans of departments. We sit down with Members on the capital program. They are aware of the process. They know that for every year we put a capital plan together, there are many projects that litter that capital planning floor and we don’t have the resources to make it all happen.

Mr. Speaker, what we are putting in place in our communities is not something that should be discarded in a matter of just making a statement to say we don’t do anything. In fact, the capital plan, how we do business, shows we are working with communities to make sure that they have the authority and the resources to do it. We work with our partner the federal government, we are working with industry, we work with communities, we are working with aboriginal governments, but still we have limited resources in what we can do across the Territory. So we’re forced to then try to work in a manner that allows for the flow in the system to work. As projects are required, they are replaced.

I can say, Mr. Speaker, for example the schools in Inuvik, when I was first elected in 1995, were supposed to be replaced in 1997. We’re just starting to see that work get done now. So things at times have to wait their turn to progress and we are all working together to make sure we give the best service to the people of the Northwest Territories. Thank you.