This is page numbers 6849 - 6882 of the Hansard for the 16th Assembly, 6th Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was safety.

Topics

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

I’d like to thank the Minister for that. That certainly provides some clarity. I wasn’t sure, or I didn’t understand that it was the compensation that we’re paying instead of the rehabilitation that might be driving up these costs. I’m hoping the Minister can provide some assurances that we are changing our direction on how we’re going to be dealing with these and we’re going to focus more on promotion, or, sorry, prevention and rehabilitation rather than compensation. It seems to me that we really want to get our employees back to work, or better yet, we would like our employees not to go off work. So if I can get some assurances from the Minister that we are moving in that direction, that would be great. Thank you.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I guess that’s the approach that we want to take. We’re having these occupational health and safety standards and committees, and in conjunction with that we’ve also started focusing on our duty to accommodate. We’ve hired a duty to accommodate officer. We’ll be working very closely with WSCC so that we can work with individuals and help them get accommodated earlier rather than having to pay compensation, because, like, 62.4 percent of our costs are due to compensation. Thank you.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Once again, thanks to the Minister for that response. I’m happy to hear that we’re working in that direction.

The other part of that question was more focused on promotion. Earlier in the Minister’s responses to my colleague Mr. Bromley, he indicated that 43 percent of all of our claims are a result of falls, overexertion, climbing, and twisting. Mr. Speaker, all of these are completely avoidable. All of these, through proper training, education, and proper quality assurance and health and wellness training for our staff, every one of these can be avoided. If they’re avoided, we don’t have claims costs, which means we also don’t have people off for extended periods of time, we have employees that are healthier. So what is being done to enhance our promotion and training?

Yes, I understand from a previous response that these health and safety committee structures are going to be established, but I also know that we only have one health and safety officer in the Government of the Northwest Territories, or at least only one that I was able to find on the GNWT website, and that’s at Stanton. Where’s the rest of them, Mr. Speaker?

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

In addition to all of the criteria with regard to Safe Advantage program that we’re introducing, and I’ll just go through very quickly and I referenced several times the

Government of the Northwest Territories Occupational Health and Safety Program and some of the things that we will be including are occupational health and safety management, occupational health and safety training, incident management, inspections, emergency preparedness, hazard management in Occupational Health and Safety Program evaluation. So we’ll have the structure and we’ll be working very closely with Workers’ Safety and Compensation Committee so that we can promote workplace training, increasing awareness regarding workplace safety, and also working with the department so that we can identify and get rid of unsafe worksites. So all of these things we’ll be working together to improve our record, because I agree that a large part of these incidents can be avoided, and that, as such, will reduce our costs. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. Your final supplementary, Mr. Abernethy.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It sounds like the Minister and I are on the same page. We ultimately want to avoid having any of these incidents occur, and when they do unfortunately occur, we want to be able to help the people transition back into the workforce as quickly as possible.

In developing this plan, and I’m very, very pleased that this plan has been developed and that it will be introduced hopefully soon so that others can see it. I think in order to be effective and develop it appropriately, we need to have a sense within the Government of the Northwest Territories of where the majority of these incidents occur. I don’t know if the department actually has a breakdown by department or by worksite or work type where these incidences are occurring. If we do, I would ask the Minister provide it to Members so we have a bit of a sense as to where these things are going so that we can focus in as an Assembly on solving these problems, and if the Minister doesn’t have that in HR, it must exist in the WSCC because they’re able to break down to the penny what our penalties are, which means or suggests to me that they have a pretty thorough listing of where all these things are occurring. So can the Minister commit to providing the Members with a bit of a breakdown as to where these incidents or the majority of these incidents are occurring, so that we can have a better understanding and work to solve this problem in the future? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I can provide the following information: The top three natures of injury were: sprains, strains, and tears, 15 percent; bruises and contusions, 13 percent; cuts and lacerations, 9 percent; and the top three locations of injury were Yellowknife, 51 percent; Fort Smith, 16 percent; Inuvik, 10 percent. The majority of the incidents are

in facilities that operate 24/7, 365 days a year, Mr. Speaker. Thank you.

Question 173-16(6): GNWT Workplace Health And Safety Performance
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. McLeod. The honourable Member for Tu Nedhe, Mr. Beaulieu.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

August 22nd, 2011

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe

Mahsi cho, Mr. Speaker. In my Member’s statement I talked about the youth, and programs and infrastructure that are needed for the youth in the communities. I have questions for the Minister of youth. Mr. Speaker, I’d like to ask the Minister what this government is going to do to ensure that some of the much needed infrastructure that was built for the youth is going to continue on to the other communities that don’t have that infrastructure yet. Thank you.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

The Speaker Paul Delorey

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. The honourable Minister responsible for youth, Mr. Robert McLeod.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The communities have done a really good job at identifying projects for the youth and they’ve been identifying dollars. They’ve actually been putting money towards it, and that’s been encouraging. I think one of the legacies of the 16

Legislative Assembly could be the amount of money that this Assembly has put into youth. Never has any Assembly before us put as much money into youth as we have, and it’s through the work of all Members of this Assembly identifying that youth are a priority, not only identifying that they’re a priority but actually putting money towards it to the tune of almost $4 million. So I think that’s been a significant investment in youth by the 16

Legislative Assembly. Thank you.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe

That’s a good response; I appreciate that. The infrastructure that I referred to, again, is there has been a good response from the government. But again, not all the communities have the much needed infrastructure. So I guess recognizing the fact that the communities have the capital dollars in their possession to do with as they please, spending it in their community. However, I’m wondering if the department, MACA, in response with the youth, has provided some sort of support to the communities to ensure that this start of the infrastructure, this $4 million in infrastructure that has come will continue to the communities even if the money has to be found from outside the GNWT. Thank you.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The communities themselves are getting their capital dollars and they’ve put a lot of money into youth infrastructure. I’ve been fortunate that I’ve been able to attend the opening of the youth centre in Paulatuk, and community centres, and in Fort Resolution they’re

doing a youth centre there and a lot of it is a decision that’s made by the community. What our role is, is we continue to support them through the Youth Centre Initiative, which the money in the Youth Centre Initiative has almost doubled and the uptake in it has gone from 17 to about 34 community youth centres taken. So that’s where we see our role.

We continue to work with the communities. They identify their five-year capital plans and, again, I’ve been quite encouraged by the amount of money that they’ve identified and put towards youth infrastructure in their community. Thank you.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe

Does this government plan on moving forward with any transitional document to try to provide support for the communities to hire qualified youth workers? I think that if we have some program dollars, or we have some infrastructure, the one piece of the puzzle that seems to be missing is qualified youth workers who work with the youth so that they have programs that are viable at the community level.

Question 174-16(6): Government Investment In Youth Programming
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Each community will usually have a recreation coordinator and they’ll hire their own youth workers as their budget allows.

What we’ve been able to do through the work of this Assembly is put more money into regional youth officers to work with the communities. We’ve also made the multi-sport games and the Youth Ambassador Program permanent line items in the budget. That assures us that those items are going to stay as part of the Legislative Assembly’s way of doing business.

The youth centre, the youth sports event through the work of the Rural and Remote Communities Committee have put almost $400,000 into multi-sport or regional sport games so the youth have an opportunity. We’ll continue to work with the communities.

The Member also makes a good point that we need to ensure this is all part of a transition document so that the 17

Legislative Assembly can carry on

some of the work that was started in the 16

.