This is page numbers 127 - 164 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

Members Present

Mr. Beaulieu, Mr. Blake, Hon. Caroline Cochrane, Ms. Green, Hon. Jackson Lafferty, Hon. Bob McLeod, Hon. Robert McLeod, Mr. McNeely, Hon. Alfred Moses, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. O'Reilly, Hon. Wally Schumann, Hon. Louis Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Vanthuyne

The House met at 10:00 a.m.

Prayer
Prayer

Elder Mike Crapeau

I will pray for you, the people all across Canada. They will be working together for me, my [English translation not provided]. I was born here. I have lived in Yellowknife all my life. That many people. We love. Now I'm happy to pray for you. We work together nice all right across Canada for the whole of Canada, work together nice, be nice to each other, be happy to work together and to hold the land. I pray for you. For all of you. Mahsi cho. [English translation not provided]

Prayer
Prayer

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Good morning, colleagues. Colleagues, before we begin, I would like to take this moment to remind everybody that we will be hosting a reception in the Great Hall this afternoon from 3:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. to mark the upcoming retirement of our very own deputy clerk, Mr. Doug Schauerte. All Members and staff of the Legislative Assembly are welcome, as are Doug's family and his friends and colleagues as well. Please join us in celebrating a remarkable career of public service and service to the Legislative Assembly. Masi.

Item 2, Ministers' statements. The Honourable Premier.

Minister's Statement 13-18(3): Working Together For The Northwest Territories
Ministers' Statements

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, before Members finish this sitting and go their separate ways until the House sits again, I wanted to take a few moments to reflect on our experiences together over the past few weeks and the past two years.

When the 19 of us met in November 2015 as newly elected Members, we agreed that the 18th Legislative Assembly needed to change the way it does business. I supported that priority then and I still support it today. So too, I believe, do all my other colleagues on both sides of this House.

One of the first changes we made included publishing the first-ever four-year mandate of the Government of the Northwest Territories. As well, for the first time in 20 years, we agreed to formally review our progress, and Ministers' ability, to meet that mandate halfway through our term.

These are all positive steps towards improved transparency and accountability. Although we may not have fully anticipated how these changes would play out, I still think our intentions were for the best and that there are valuable lessons to be had. Change is never easy, Mr. Speaker. I don't think any of us should be surprised that making that change has been difficult, but we should not let that discourage us. We have done a lot over the last two years, but we still have much to do.

Consensus has served the territory well and gives us the tools we need to make the best decisions for the residents of the Northwest Territories. Mr. Speaker, consensus is about working together to make collective decisions. It is not about one side or the other winning. That does not mean there will be unanimous agreement on every decision, but it does mean that Members on both sides always need to be prepared to listen to and consider diverging opinions inside this Chamber, in committee, and in our own private discussions with each other.

The people of the Northwest Territories want and deserve the best government that we can be. As Premier, I am committed to doing whatever I can to live up to their expectations, and so are all the Members of this Legislative Assembly. Cabinet has heard clearly from Members about their frustrations and their concerns. We have all worked hard, but we can do better. As a consensus government, the contributions of Regular Members and standing committees will be essential to our success as a Legislative Assembly. I hope that we will be able to count on all Members for their support where it is warranted, criticism where it is deserved, and their best ideas and suggestions always.

We were elected because people believed that we could make life better for both current residents and for those in our future. Let's work together during our remaining two years to make a better territory for our people. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 13-18(3): Working Together For The Northwest Territories
Ministers' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements.

Minister's Statement 13-18(3): NWT Highway Improvements
Ministers' Statements

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, the Government of the Northwest Territories is following through on its mandate to strengthen connections with public sector partners in order to invest in strategic transportation infrastructure.

Improving and extending our highways system helps connect communities, reduces the cost of living, improves the resiliency of our transportation system to climate change, and increases access to natural resources. I am proud to say we have carried out improvements to almost every highway in the Northwest Territories over the past two years. These improvements have been possible thanks to continued investment by the GNWT and federal funding under the New Building Canada Plan.

The first bundle of funding under the New Building Canada Plan was announced in 2015. The federal government provided $72 million, while our government provided $24 million. Rehabilitation work was completed on highways throughout the Northwest Territories using the skilled workforces of a variety of northern contractors. Examples of investments include widening sections of Highway No. 8 and working on Highway No. 7, such as resurfacing parts of the Liard highway and chipsealing over 30 kilometres of Highway No. 6.

A second bundle of highway improvement projects was approved in 2016, through which the federal government provided $60.7 million while the GNWT contributed over $25.2 million, for a total investment of $100.9 million. Reconstruction work under this funding included the Nahanni Butte and Jean Marie River access roads. This funding also allows the Department of Infrastructure to undertake several key projects, such as the rehabilitation of the Buffalo River Bridge and construction of the new Canyon Creek access road.

Mr. Speaker, major rehabilitation works on the Buffalo River Bridge began in July 2016 and will be completed this fall. Originally constructed in 1964, improvements to the bridge will allow it to accommodate modern highway loads and extend its service life.

The Canyon Creek access road will provide significant benefits to the Sahtu Region throughout all phases of construction. There will be many job training opportunities for construction, technical, and support positions. This training will allow residents to gain valuable skills that will be useful for future projects and opportunities. When the road opens, residents will benefit from improved access to traditional hunting, fishing, and other recreational opportunities. The new road could also facilitate the development of a wellness camp for the region and open up potential resources south of Norman Wells. Going forward, the Government of the Northwest Territories is seeking federal approval of funding for a third bundle of projects. This funding will extend the work done under the previous bundles to support safe travelling, community access roads, and resource development.

The Government of the Northwest Territories is also actively pursuing new opportunities to further expand our transportation system. I am pleased to announce that the federal government has favourably reviewed our expressions of interest in securing federal funding for both the Mackenzie Valley highway and the Slave Geological Province access corridor. They have now invited us to enter into the next phase of their approval process. We will provide them with detailed project proposals during the first week of November.

Our third major proposed corridor, the Tlicho all-season road, has received conditional funding from P3 Canada and is in the midst of an environmental assessment process under the Mackenzie Valley Environmental Review Board. Finally, as I am sure you all know, we are getting ready to celebrate the highway milestone in Canada: the opening of the Inuvik to Tuktoyaktuk Highway, linking Canada from coast to coast to coast.

Highways are the lynchpin of our transportation system. They connect communities and unlock our economic potential by enabling exploration and development. We are proud of our northern highway system that enables the movement of goods and people in exceptionally rugged terrain and a challenging environment. We are excited about the new possibilities that will be opened up if our corridors become a reality in the North. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 13-18(3): NWT Highway Improvements
Ministers' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Item 3, Members' statements. Member for Hay River North.

Hay River Business Skilled Labour Requirements
Members' Statements

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, there is no better way for a government to ensure healthy people and vibrant communities than to support a growing economy. This creates jobs, gives our residents the ability to support themselves and their families, and allows them to lead productive and fulfilling lives.

Right now, the future is bright for Hay River's economy. There are hundreds of job opportunities on the horizon. If all goes well, the Pine Point Mine will create 320 jobs, and the Pellet Plant, the new long-term care centre, and opportunities in manufacturing will create another 60 jobs each. This is good news, but only if we can make the most of these opportunities. We need people who are trained and able to take advantage of these jobs and the spin-off jobs that come with increased economic activity. We must ensure that entrepreneurs who want to build new businesses or grow existing ones have the support they need to make it happen. We need to encourage people to come north and to make Hay River their home.

Small business owners are not looking for handouts. They want this government to help them help themselves. I have heard about their difficulty attracting skilled labour to the North and the barriers they encounter when trying to bring in foreign labour, especially when dealing with the federal government.

They have told me about their challenges with the Temporary Foreign Workers Program and the red tape associated with obtaining the necessary labour market impact assessments. I am told that because of Hay River's location potential employers are expected by the federal government to pay wages similar to those offered in the oil sands and the diamond mining sectors. This is ridiculous, Mr. Speaker. It only underlines what we already know, that the federal government does not understand the North.

I have also heard from small businesses and labour about the difficulty they have navigating the apprenticeship system and helping their employees to navigate it, both for current apprentices and for those who want to apprentice. In our mandate, we have committed to "increase the number of immigrants working in the NWT" by "implementing an immigration strategy that prioritizes streamlining applications processes, increasing awareness of immigration programs, and consolidating our administrative supports." The GNWT has also committed to get more educated and skilled young people into the labour market by matching employer needs through improved career development supports.

To achieve this, we need more support through ECE to capitalize on the potential jobs coming to Hay River. The career development officers in Hay River are doing what they can, but the office is understaffed for the current demand, let alone the increasing demand on the horizon. Instead of bureaucracy and red tape, we need the GNWT to be innovative on how it delivers on its mandate commitments, and, simply, we need more bodies in the ECE office in Hay River. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Hay River Business Skilled Labour Requirements
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Family Violence Awareness Week
Members' Statements

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it is Family Violence Awareness Week, and this year's theme is healthy relationships and healthy communication. Events are being held throughout the Northwest Territories, with the one in Yellowknife taking place on October 21st. These events are made possible by the hard work of the Coalition against Family Violence, and I want to thank them for their support of this campaign each year. Their tireless efforts continue to make change for the better throughout our territory, and these efforts do not go unnoticed. Thanks to them, our citizens are now wiser, stronger, and safer.

Mr. Speaker, healthy communication is important for any family, workplace, or community. It is the bedrock of healthy relationships and crucial to supporting a safe society. Family violence is a serious problem, and we need to talk about it and stand against it wherever and whenever we can, because in 2017 we still live in a country where one in three women and one in six men will experience some form of sexual violence in their lifetime. Our own territorial statistics reveal an even more troubling reality, as women in the NWT are nine to 12 times at greater risk of experiencing sexual violence than women in other provinces. Only 5 per cent of victims will report sexual violence to police.

While we recognize this week to raise awareness about this important issue, another important campaign is taking place on the international stage. The #MeToo Campaign is a movement launched on social media by actress Alyssa Milano in response to the serious revelations of sexual abuse in the film and entertainment industry. Within 20 minutes, the campaign had 20,000 replies. The goal of the campaign is to encourage the survivors of sexual assault and abuse to come forward and raise the number of stories to a point where people cannot ignore the problem anymore. Through this campaign, survivors know they are part of a global community that can support and stand beside victims.

Mr. Speaker, the #MeToo Campaign has inspired many women in the Northwest Territories to come forward and share their stories. They are very brave to tell these stories, and their courage allows us to start having real conversations at every level of society, including here in the halls of power.

Mr. Speaker, just look around this Chamber. You will find mostly men, and because of that, we lack the experience and perspectives that many women are sharing through this campaign and in their communities. From all this I know we have to work that much harder to be an ally to women and to support real action against sexual violence. I will continue to speak out against abuse wherever it is found. No one should suffer in silence, afraid to use their voice against those who have taken power away from them. As leaders of our people, we must continue to stand against the epidemic of family violence and recommit our efforts to eliminating it once and for all. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Family Violence Awareness Week
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Public Housing In Indigenous Communities
Members' Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I would like to speak on the issue of federal government funds for First Nations and the NWT and that not all the funding reaches community government or band councils for housing.

Mr. Speaker, this past year I met with many constituents in my riding, which includes community and Indigenous governments. They have expressed their concerns on the lack of programs and service funding that can help address all aspects of their community members. I will be attending an Akaitcho Territory Government's 25th annual assembly held in Fort Resolution October 31, 2017 to November 2nd. I believe the issue will be expressed there, and I would like to see changes in the near future to address future housing funding for Indigenous communities. It was noted on CBC News that the national chief of the Dene Nation, Bill Erasmus, wants Ottawa to fund First Nations communities in the Northwest Territories directly instead of funneling funding through the territorial government. The national chief noted that money goes through the territorial government; from there it goes to the public purse and is disbursed so that the whole population has access to our dollars. I support Bill Erasmus, and I would like to see action on this issue. I would like to see the territorial government working with the federal government and First Nations to implement the process as this will see funding flow directly for housing programs flow directly to First Nations in the NWT.

Mr. Speaker, this process may address the homelessness and housing issues across the North. I have received many complaints from my constituents that they have issues obtaining a dwelling in their communities that is available, affordable, and fair. We also have too many families sharing two- and three-bedroom units with extended family. Also, I have received complaints from young people who are homeless and are going from home to home and with no place to stay. These communities do not have shelters to help with the homeless.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to point out that our MP for the Northwest Territories, Michael McLeod, who sits on the finance committee, supports Erasmus' proposal. He said it is time for Indigenous communities in the territory to control their own finances. "If we are going to support the whole notion of Indigenous government, we have to let them govern and give them the tools to govern when they are ready." Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Public Housing In Indigenous Communities
Members' Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Mr. Speaker, I, too, support this proposal and would like our government to work on this issue that needs to be addressed in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Public Housing In Indigenous Communities
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Summer Student Employment
Members' Statements

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it will be another opportunity for me to talk about summer student positions here. Mr. Speaker, summer student positions are a great way to get the youth to come back to their communities during their time off from school. This program will also reveal to the students how important education is, especially for securing jobs and potentially a career.

The students employed by the Student Employment Program are already beginning to benefit from their education by way of obtaining a summer position, which is very encouraging. In addition to promoting education, the summer student employment program offers students direct work experience.

Studying in a specific area of interest and later applying the knowledge attained is a challenge that the students face. This program offers students a chance to directly apply skills and knowledge and to learn them in post-secondary, allowing students to be more prepared once they graduate. The total number of students hired for the summer of 2017 was 349 positions. Out of the total, 202 students, or 58 per cent, were Indigenous Aboriginal students. Both these numbers have increased since 2016, and I applaud the government for this. The number of total hires in the summer of 2017 increased from the previous years from 306 to 349, resulting in 43 more hires. For Indigenous Aboriginal hires, 2017 showed an increase from 177 to 202 hires, resulting in 25 more hires. This year, there were 16 students hired in Fort Simpson; nice to see. Unfortunately, no students were employed from the smaller communities of Fort Liard, Nahanni Butte, Jean Marie, Sambaa K'e, or Wrigley. This is a result of either a lack of opportunity or a lack of student applications.

In Fort Simpson, summer students were employed by a number of departments, including the ENR, Lands, MACA, NWT Housing Corporation, and human resources in the health department. I understand there are no regional offices for said departments in smaller communities, but maybe other employment opportunities for students in smaller communities should be explored. Year after year, I see an increase in summer students hired, but not in the smaller communities in my riding. It pains me that they are left behind. Mr. Speaker, the Summer Student Program provides an invaluable experience for our youth. I hope we will continue to see the success and expansion of this program and the positive impact it has on our youth. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Summer Student Employment
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nunakput.

Recognition Of The 99th Birthday Of Persis Gruben Ayownik
Members' Statements

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Quyanainni, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today is a special day in Nunakput and the Northwest Territories because it is Persis Gruben Ayownik's 99th birthday. She's not only the oldest person in the Inuvialuit Settlement Region, but the only survivor of Shingle Point Residential School, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, Persis' mother Sarah widowed very young, as Persis' father died in an accident before Persis was even born. Most of Sarah's relatives suggested that she put her daughter up for adoption, but Sarah was determined to keep her. Sarah married once more to an lnuk man named Lennie lnglangasuk at the age of 18, and Persis was brought to Banks Island.

Old man Lennie was the only father she had ever known. Lennie adopted Persis as his very own daughter, and Persis never stopped loving him, as he was very good to her. Despite her background as a Gwich'in woman, she learned lnuvialuktun and many Inuk dialects, but don't ever call her Gwich'in. I've been warned, so she says.

Persis and her family have travelled all over the Arctic waters of Northern Canada in her father's schooner in the 1920s, going from one adventure to the next. Some of these adventures were when Persis saved their stranded schooner with her stockings, or when she and her sister shot a polar bear from the deck of the schooner and fleshed it before they starved to death, or the time they amounted $60,000 dollars in one year from a combination of an abundant fox harvest and high-quality sewing, or when she met Charlie Gruben in Aklavik and they married in 1937.

In 1956, Persis returned to Tuktoyaktuk, and then her adventures never stopped, such as when she had to dig her infant daughter Eileen out of the snow from a dog sled mishap in 1949. Persis had 11 children in total. Starting from the oldest, Agnes, John, Mabel, Frank, Sammy, Sarah, Eileen, Freddy, Buddy, Lena, and her youngest and most favourite, Chucky, so he says.

Mr. Speaker, Persis has been known for her good sewing skills, proven by her exotic sewing designs. Mr. Speaker, people young and old still approach her for information on the lnuvialuit culture. Mr. Speaker, please join me as we wish Persis a happy 99th birthday, and let's get to see elders living strong and a long time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of The 99th Birthday Of Persis Gruben Ayownik
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Sahtu.

Mackenzie Valley Highway Project
Members' Statements

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, as we conclude our session for the 2017 calendar year and look forward to the resources of next year's fiscal proposal with high hopes of Infrastructure budget releases. Mr. Speaker, this brings to the mandate of this government and my 2015 election priorities of working towards supporting the construction for the long-desired project, the Mackenzie Valley highway. Mr. Speaker, today I highlight the continuous efforts by our group as follows.

This infrastructure is an already-supported highway by the previous Assembly, for an application submitted to the federal government dated March 2014. The main project scope involves 330 kilometres of roadway from Wrigley to Norman Wells at the capital cost of $700 million, and this includes the 470-metre span bridge crossing the Great Bear River at the junction of Tulita and the Mackenzie. Project embankment and project bridge expenditures will contribute 28 per cent in the Deh Cho, and 72 per cent in the Sahtu.

Mr. Speaker, the project will see growth in the NWT and national gross domestic product, affordable access for public, industry, and government goods and services. The project will see growth in the Sahtu and, most of all, "unlocking the potential," thus allowing the Sahtu to provide meaningful economic contributions by being an active economic player and providing access to 26 per cent of the NWT land quantum.

Mr. Speaker, maintaining the balance of fiscal policy and our region's continued efforts, we hold by developing a multi-program financing model that would be supportive by all stakeholders on a sectional approach, as we understand without financing or funding, we have no programming or projects. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to complete my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Mackenzie Valley Highway Project
Members' Statements

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, colleagues. Mr. Speaker, other NWT areas have and will enjoy economic infrastructure benefits. The Sahtu, in particular the community of Tulita, looks forward to advancing the shovel-ready Bear River Bridge which was procured in 2006. Later Mr. Speaker, I will have questions for the appropriate Minister for a joint advancing. Mahsi.

Mackenzie Valley Highway Project
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Issues With Public Housing Modular Units
Members' Statements

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In the life of this Assembly, the NWT Housing Corporation has brought a number of modular units into our small communities in an effort to tackle public housing infrastructure needs. So far in my riding, Aklavik has received two units, and Tsiigehtchic has received one. NWT communities can anticipate additional units in the future. There is no doubt that adequate, affordable housing is a major need in the Northwest Territories, from the small communities to the regional centres and Yellowknife. The Housing Corporation's strategy is one of cost savings, moving away from more durable, long-lasting stick-built homes and relying on modular units built somewhere else and trucked or barged in.

Mr. Speaker, myself and many of my colleagues have repeatedly warned the government that their search for cost savings through modular units means expenses crop up somewhere else. Specifically, it means that jobs, including opportunities to access training, gain work experience, build skills, and bring an income, are taken away from the small communities.

There is also the question of quality. Some of my constituents worry about the quality and durability of these trailers compared to stick-built units, especially through the severe winters in remote communities. They wonder about the unit's life span and what kind of value for money the units will have in the long run.

When I spoke about the local housing organizations yesterday, I highlighted the Housing Corporation's work to support housing leadership and decision-making in the communities at the community level, helping communities take a leadership role with all of the benefits that it brings, but the same philosophy applies to construction, too, not just property management.

Residents want to play their part in their communities, Mr. Speaker, and they want to work. They do not want to keep watching jobs go elsewhere. Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I will have questions later today.

Issues With Public Housing Modular Units
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Status Of Government Legislative Initiatives
Members' Statements

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to share my dismay with the glacial pace with which Cabinet is advancing legislation during this 18th Assembly. The pace is so slow that we have no hope of accomplishing all of the proposed legislative initiatives that we inherited from the 17th Assembly and those that come from our mandate. Mr. Speaker, reviewing, debating, and approving legislation is one of our most fundamental tasks as Members. It is our responsibility to write laws that respond to the needs of residents and to provide them with good governance.

At this midway point of our term, we have passed 33 bills. Half of them are about money, including appropriations and supplementary appropriations for both the operations and capital budgets. Of the other half, most bills were small in scope, where a tweak or an update was required to existing legislation. In two years, in my estimation, we have dealt with only five bills with any substance that were not mandatory money bills. There has been less legislation passed in the first two years of this Assembly than in either the 16th or 17th Assemblies.

Mr. Speaker, I had hoped the government would pick up the pace as this third session of the Assembly gets under way, but that is not happening. Just one non-money bill has been introduced. It is not as if there is no need for new legislation. There is work under way on the new Mineral Resources Act. The Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs outlined an ambitious legislative agenda earlier this month, including replacing the Civil Emergency Measures Act, updating the Fire Prevention Act, and amending the Cities, Towns, and Villages Act, but we have yet to see this legislation. The Minister of Environment and Natural Resources told us earlier this month there are four pieces of legislation he would like to update, including the Forest Management Act and the Waters Act, but again, we have nothing in hand today to review. Our mandate commits us to closing our term with an Ombudsman Act in place. The point is that every department has a list of legislation it plans to introduce during this 18th Assembly.

Mr. Speaker, we are about to begin a three-and-a-half-month recess with only one bill to review. Next year, if everything on the legislative agenda comes to fruition, the various standing committees will be hard-pressed to keep up. In fact, as I have said earlier, it is impossible for us to complete all the legislative initiatives government is contemplating at the pace it is moving. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement. Thank you.

---Unanimous consent granted

Status Of Government Legislative Initiatives
Members' Statements

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi. In fact, it is impossible for us to complete all the legislative initiatives government is contemplating at the pace it is moving. I will have questions for the Premier about our progress through the legislative agenda. Mahsi.

Status Of Government Legislative Initiatives
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Frame Lake.

Midwifery Services In The Northwest Territories
Members' Statements

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Midwifery: where to begin? We go back to the last Assembly in 2012, when public advocacy prompted the government to commission a Midwifery Review and Expansion Analysis Report. That report recommended options for expansion of midwifery service, including creating a territorial model based out of Yellowknife in 2015-2016, so that the full rollout could be done in 2016-2017. Mr. Speaker, that was last year.

The Minister stated in July 2015 that he was still committed to introducing midwifery services, but then there was no money; so a further study and further public consultation was commissioned by the department, staffed by two term consultants. In explaining the intended outcomes of this study, the Minister said on June 1, 2016, "We have those consultants in place. They're working on evaluation frameworks, not to reinvestigate it, but to help us develop a territorial model."

The report that was recently released is sorely lacking. Basically, this is because none of the three stated purposes of the study was to recommend a preferred plan for establishing midwifery services. The study only looked at:

• perceived gaps in service;

• potential enhancements for an integrated midwifery program; and

• potential support for community health nurses.

It is not surprising the report only recommended further study, examining the feasibility of midwifery expansion to Hay River as a regional program and the reinstatement of the Yellowknife position with travel resources to enable travel to other communities, and yet more study, examining the feasibility of an integrated Beaufort Delta service establishment and proposals for service to Behchoko.

It is not clear what the next steps may be.

I cannot describe my disappointment in reading that, when it comes to establishing actual positions in communities, we are still stuck in the "feasibility" stage. How many more studies will this take? The Minister promised that we would get a proposal for a territorial midwifery program, not a proposal for more studies. I will have questions during the upcoming business plans on what is being done right now and when we are going to see a territorial midwifery program with services available in Yellowknife. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Midwifery Services In The Northwest Territories
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Ingraham Trail Road Safety And Maintenance
Members' Statements

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Mr. Speaker, this morning there was another highway accident on the Ingraham Trail outside Yellowknife. Like many previous incidents, this one took place on the section of highway near the Prosperous Lake boat launch. This is a challenging stretch of road, Mr. Speaker.

Already this morning I have been contacted by both the media and my constituents who live along the Ingraham Trail. They are understandably concerned about the safety of the road they rely on and drive every day. Again, we have a reminder about the importance of focusing and taking deliberate action to make our roads as safe as possible. I have raised the question of ongoing maintenance and improvement of this road with the Minister on numerous occasions, and I commend him that I have always received forthright and positive responses. I have seen myself that the department works hard to make continuing improvements in the highway's condition.

I don't yet know much, but as far as I can determine this morning's accident did not incur serious results, but it serves as a reminder that we cannot rest in facing challenges of public safety on our roads. Like other NWT highways, the Ingraham Trail grows busier every year, and we are soon to enter its busiest season.

Along with maintenance and improvements, we must also continue to emphasize and support driver education and safe driving habits. While capital investment is needed to promote safety on all our roadways, efforts to educate our travelling public, and prevent drinking and driving cannot be overemphasized. Motor vehicle accidents can be avoided through a combination of safe driving practices and infrastructure, maintenance, and upgrading. Our government must continue to support both.

I will have questions for the Minister of Infrastructure at the appropriate time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Ingraham Trail Road Safety And Maintenance
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am pleased to recognize my wife Judy in the gallery joining us for our session today. Welcome.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nunakput.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize a couple of people: Mr. Herb Felix from Tuktoyaktuk and Charles Pokiak from Tuktoyaktuk as well. Mr. Speaker, they work for the Inuvialuit on environmental and wildlife issues, so I just want to commend them for the work they do and keep it up. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Sahtu.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize my aunt providing valued interpretation in Slavey here. She is watching my back currently. Ms. Alphonsine McNeely. Mahsi.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I, too would like to recognize interpreters Tom Unka and Maro Sundberg. It would be my last opportunity this year. Then, again, to recognize Ashton Catholique and River Marlow, the two hardworking Pages from Lutselk'e. Thank you.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Frame Lake.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize Mr. William Lines. He is the Giant Mine coordinator for the Yellowknives Dene First Nation and I very much appreciate his work on that important issue. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Item 6, acknowledgments. Item 7, oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today in my Member's statement I talked about summer employment and the program that the government offers and is doing a better job. I have to give credit where credit is due. Mr. Speaker, can the Minister of Finance please tell us what the department is doing for potential employment for smaller communities in regards to the Summer Employment Program? Thank you.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Minister of Finance.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Member pointed out before that the government has hired 349 summer students this year. That is the highest number we have had in the last five years. We have challenged our departments actually to try and find more, including in a lot of the small communities, because I would like to see a summer student hired in every community, but if you look at the number of summer students who are hired by maybe the local housing authorities or the municipal government organizations that are funded by the government, I think those numbers would go up. I have been trying to put those numbers together. We are getting a better number of the number of students that are working across the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Mahsi cho to the Minister for his answer. I greatly appreciate that and understand the importance of that, but again some of my smaller communities don't have LHOs and don't have these opportunities. Some of them don't even have students who are going on to university. Mr. Speaker, can the Minister get back to us or tell us if he is able to work with his department to look at hiring some students that are in high school that go back into these smaller communities? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, summer students hired by the GNWT are typically post-secondary students. We try to get as many out as we can. The ones who are going to university, so I am not sure if we wanted to bump them, but we can work, and as I said before, we are working to trying to increase it. Every community in the Northwest Territories has some funding come in directly or indirectly from the territorial governments, so I would like to put those numbers together and see the true number of summer students who are working, because I know with a lot of the smaller communities, they use a lot of their school students to do some of the summer work. I will commit to try and get some of those numbers put together. We will share them with committee so we can have a true indication of the number of students that are working.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for his answer. I look forward to seeing those numbers. I greatly appreciate the commitment from the Minister to hear that. Will the Minister, and I have asked this before, will the Minister look at working with his colleagues to develop a budget line in the business plan for summer students so that we can actually promote it? I know we were looking at 400 as a number in the past, and we got close to it. Will the Minister commit to working to doing that?

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

I will work with my colleagues, but as far as the budget line goes, I don't think that is in the plans right now. The work for summer students is based on an operation basis, so as there needed to do some work, they are hired or to work on special projects. The operation requirements vary between the departments, but as I have pointed out before, we have seen an increase in the numbers. All of the Cabinet Ministers have encouraged their departments to try and bring on more summer students.

I am going to use this as an opportunity to point out the three departments within the government that had the most summer students in the past year. Number one was Infrastructure, but that is really not fair because we combined two departments, so that is why the numbers were higher. Health and Social Service was second, and the Department of ENR was third. I will bring attention to that, so our departments know that we are paying attention and we would like to encourage them to continue higher summer students as operational requirements permit.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I thank the Minister for that answer. That is very encouraging. I would really love to see ENR being number one. ENR has a real impact in my riding. I would encourage the Minister to do that. Can the Minister, if they are not going to put a budget line in there, work on developing a plan to encourage the departments and work with us as Regular MLAs as an opportunity so we can find these opportunities for our summer students? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, I think we just heard from one of the Members before speaking during the Member's statement talking about plans and strategies and action plans. I don't think we need to put a plan together. We know what we have to do and we just have to do it. If that means working with and we have the opportunity going through the business planning process and the budget process to get feedback from committees. We are not going to plan to do. We are just going to do it. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 37-18(3): Summer Student Employment In Small Communities
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Just like the Member for Nahendeh asked questions about summer students every sitting, I have to ask questions about commercial fishing. I have some questions for the Minister of ITI. Earlier this year, the federal government commissioned a study on the future of the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation. I know that those people conducting the study came to the Northwest Territories. They spoke with the department and they spoke with the fishermen. Because the NWT is the last territory or province legally obliged to deal with the Freshwater Fish Marketing Corporation, I have a feeling that our input played quite a big role in this. I was told that this report would be ready by the fall. I would like to ask the Minister if we can get some details about what that report said. Thank you.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We have had ongoing discussions on this issue with the department. As of today, we still have not received a report, but my understanding is we will have it in the coming days. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

That is an important report moving forward. We just approved a million four for the fish plants in Hay River. Is the Minister going to make that report public so that we can see what is in it?

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

My understanding in talking with the federal government on this report coming forward is that there is some sensitive information there that we might not be able to share publicly, but I believe, whatever we can share publicly, we will be able to do that.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Moving on to another fishing issue. Like I said, this House has been debating the supplementary estimates. We recently discussed $1.4 million for a fish plant in Hay River. I have a bunch of questions about this. I will just ask the Minister: what is going on with the fish plant in Hay River?

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

That is a very large question. It depends on which part I want to answer you, but first of all, we had 1.4 that we had in the budget and it is moving forward. The department in our conversations with the freshwater or the local fishing guys in Hay River, we decided that the Government of the Northwest Territories will proceed with this building.

Some of those reasons was the lack of access to capital and long stability for the industry. We believe that it is in the best interest of the fishing federation or for the fishermen in Hay River that we move forward with the plan. The Department of Infrastructure has actually taken a lead of this plant now in the last week or so. We have identified land within the community of Hay River that we want to do and it is in program and design phase right now. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This is going to be a GNWT-owned facility where the fishing strategy called for a contribution to the fishermen's federation and they would own this plant. I would like to know: what is the extent of partnerships with other organizations going forward, organizations such as the Fishermen's Federation in terms of the ownership and operation of this plant? Thank you.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As I have said, we work very closely with the Fishermen's Federation on this. Moving forward, it is agreed by both parties that the Government of the Northwest Territories would own the facility. They figure this is the best direction for the development of the industry and we will continue to work with the Fishing Federation on moving this initiative forward. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 38-18(3): Commercial Fishery In Hay River
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My questions today are for the Minister of Infrastructure. I had spoken earlier today about highway safety out on the Ingraham Trail, also known as Highway No. 4. Sadly, we have learned today of another accident out on that road, and it happens to be on the same stretch of road where we had another accident happen there this summer. I personally am very familiar with this stretch of road. I was involved in an accident there myself.

Can the Minister advise, as we enter this busy season, this winter season, it is going to be dark, slippery roads. How is the department managing its highway patrols and maintenance during this time of the year? Ploughing, sanding, and the like? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We have talked about this section of road quite a bit in this House. This is one of the busier sections of road in the Northwest Territories, particularly during the resupply of the mines. A number of residents live out that way. We will continue to what we normally do, doing our regular patrols, going forward. I suspect that I would have to get the exact details, but I imagine it is a daily patrol that is done by our department to check on the conditions of this section of highway, as well as maintenance which will be on an as- and when-needed basis. As I have said, this is a very important section of highway and well-travelled in the winter, and we take safety as a number one priority.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you to the Minister. I do commend him and the department for the work that they have done on Ingram Trail in recent years. It is much improved and the best I have seen it, quite frankly, but this particular section of Ingram Trail is repeatedly having accidents. It is a very busy section because there is a boat launch there. On both sides of the boat launch is a steep road with sharp corners.

Will the Minister make a commitment to doing some type of evaluation or assessment of this particular section of the road to see if there is an opportunity to maybe reengineer or maybe realign the road? We are going to do significant work on the boat launch. Maybe this is an opportunity to re-evaluate this whole section of road. Can the Minister make a commitment to doing such an evaluation?

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As of this morning, I am not even sure if this is exactly where the highway accident has taken place, but this has been an issue for the Member in the last two or three sittings that we have talked about this section of highway. I can reassure the Member and all residents of the Northwest Territories that the Highway Improvement Safety Plan that the Department of Infrastructure has is guided by the Transportation Association of Canada, and we build all of our highways in the Northwest Territories to this standard. We do routine patrols, like I have said. We get input from residents in the Northwest Territories about concerns, and particularly from the Member on this situation, and we will review all accidents and take them very seriously to see if there is some type of improvement we can do.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I can confirm from reports from a constituent, as well as a media source who attended the accident, that the accident was, in fact, on the stretch of road nearby the Prosperous boat launch. I can confirm that.

Again, I am going to strongly encourage that the Minister does take an opportunity to fully evaluate this particular stretch of road, but in the meantime, can the Minister inform the House as to what capital commitments and resources the department is going to put to this stretch of road? What do they have currently in the capital plan to improve this stretch of road? Are guard rails being considered on these two sharp corners in the capital plan? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

We have committed $8 million through Bundle 1 of Building Canada Plan on this section of highway, and we continue to spend that. The Member has asked previously in a different sitting about guard rails, and I believe that this particular section of highway is actually getting some guard rails installed in the capital plan. I would have to double-check to verify that because we have so many different projects on the go, but I am almost certain that there are guard rails going in on this section.

As I have said, the department regularly reviews accidents that have happened on the highway, no matter where it is in the NWT, to determine if there are any improvements that will be required, and we will certainly have another look at this section of highway. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 39-18(3): Highway No. 4 (Ingraham Trail) Road Safety
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in our mandate, Commitment 1.4.6 says that this government will support net metering through clear policy direction to the Public Utilities Board to provide certainty to allow customers to recover their investments in renewable energy. This is a responsibility of the Premier, and I would like to ask the Premier today if he can advise if, in fact, clear policy direction has been provided to the Public Utilities Board and what the nature of this policy direction has been. Thank you.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I will answer the first question. Yes, clear policy direction has been provided to the Public Utilities Board. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Colleagues, I would like to draw your attention to the visitors in the gallery. We have with us Chief Ernest Betsina of Ndilo. Masi for joining us today. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you. It is always nice to work together with the Honourable Premier. I just want to lay out how confusing this picture is to Members on this side of the House. The Premier is responsible for this mandate commitment. The Minister of Health is responsible for the Public Utilities Board. The Minister of Justice is responsible for the Power Corporation. The Minister of Infrastructure is the chair of the Ministerial Energy and Climate Change Committee of Cabinet and is responsible for the government's 2030 Energy Strategy. Finally, the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources is responsible for the Climate Change Strategic Framework. With all of these cooks in the kitchen, who is leading the overall coordination of energy policy-making for this government?

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

It is very clear to me. The Public Utilities Board is an independent regulator, but the Public Utilities Board funding is voted on by the Legislative Assembly, through the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs' main estimates. The commitment that the Member is referring to, Commitment 1.4.6 on net metering, falls to the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs.

With regards to who is leading the overall coordination of energy policy-making for the Government of the Northwest Territories, this is a corporate responsibility led by Cabinet with input from Regular Members, Aboriginal government communities, stakeholders, interest groups, and the general public.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

The Premier has laid that out clear. I know for a fact that subsection 14 of the Public Utilities Act gives this government the authority to issue direction to the Public Utilities Board. It is not just a funding issue. There is direct policy that can be made, and I sit on the Standing Committee of Economic Development and Environment, and we do not know what is going into these policy decisions. In fact, the last one was dropped on us with little notice.

If policy direction and development is not being shared with Regular Members, and we have to deal with five separate Ministers on various aspects of energy in the Northwest Territories, how is the Premier planning to work with us effectively to guide the Energy Strategy and allow us to have full input to make sure this works for Northerners?

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

All Members of this House should have input into the development of public policy. We have procedures and process conventions to ensure that all policy direction issued to the PUB has been shared with committees and has been made public, as well as any future policy direction to the PUB, including the draft Energy Strategy.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I just want to again remind the Premier that, over the life of this government in the last two years, any policy direction to the Public Utilities Board has been shared with standing committees after the fact. We have not been allowed to provide input into these policy decisions. Will the Premier commit to this side of the House today to ensure that the voices of the standing committees and the Regular Members are included before policy direction is given to the Public Utilities Board? Thank you.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Cabinet has directed the Public Utilities Board to consider the following principles when assessing net metering rates: costs should be transparent; costs should be borne by the customers; government customers should not be eligible for net metering; implementation criteria should provide certainty of benefits; and the capacity for individual systems taking part in net metering should be no greater than 15 kilowatts to ensure all residents and businesses should be ensured an opportunity to participate in the program. We will follow convention as per the protocol agreement to make sure that all Members are made aware. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 40-18(3): Public Utilities Board Policy Direction
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, at the midpoint of this Assembly, 33 bills have been passed, compared to 52 in the 17th Assembly after two years. My question for the Premier is: why is the pace of legislative change so slow in this Assembly? Mahsi.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We are not a factory. We operate in a Legislative Assembly. Legislative proposals and draft bills before Cabinet are confidential documents which I cannot speak to, but we have a significant number of initiatives making their way through the system for introduction in the remaining two years. We had a slow start in year one with respect to introducing legislation due to a number of factors, the late election, and the focus on the development of the mandates by this House, but in year two, we are definitely picking up speed, Mr. Speaker.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

The evidence just does not support what the Premier has said there. We are not picking up speed. We are about to start a three-and-a-half-month recess with one bill to contemplate. One bill. It is not as if this Assembly started from scratch with legislative proposals. In the transition report, there was a section about completing devolution and implementing a made-in-the-North regulatory system. That was available more than two years ago when the Premier was Premier. Why is it taking the government so long to bring this legislation forward for review?

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Legislation can take a long time to develop, and we have a number of very large initiatives under way to bring forward in the latter two years of this Assembly. The revised mandate of the Government of the Northwest Territories identifies 14 larger pieces of legislation for introduction in the 18th Legislative Assembly that we have been working very hard on.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I wonder if part of the reason for the slowness is whether there is a lack of capacity among the legislative drafters to produce all the legislation that we have contemplated pursuing during this 18th Assembly. Is capacity the issue?

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

At the rise of the House today, we expect that the 18th Legislative Assembly will have passed an additional three financial bills. As the Member indicated, this brings the total number of bills passed by this Legislative Assembly to 36, with another bill introduced and before special committee for review. In past investigations, we have determined that capacity is not an issue, and we will undertake to review that again to ensure that is not the case.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Premier if he will work with the Caucus to convene a short sitting in December so that additional bills can be introduced for review prior to the budget session. Can he make that commitment? Thank you.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Historically, the final two years of an Assembly are often the heaviest when it comes to a government's legislative agenda. The 17th Assembly had a very large number of financial bills compared to previous Assemblies, as well as ten devolution-related bills making comparison to the 18th Assembly difficult. I believe that we are on track to deliver on a fulsome and ambitious legislative agenda for the 18th Legislative Assembly. I am prepared to review it and to see what will be required to make sure that we can complete our fulsome and ambitious legislative agenda. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 41-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. [No English translation provided.]

Mr. Speaker, today in my Member's statement I talked about the funding for housing that should be flowing directly to First Nations. I would like to ask the Minister a couple of questions on that. Has the Minister examined the treaties to see what the original agreement on the treaty part of housing indicates, and if not, can she do that? Thank you.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the NWT Housing Corporation.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, that was two questions. I will do my best at answering. I can say that no, I have not examined a treaty, but I can say that the federal government last year gave the territorial government $28,673,000. That is $28 million. That works out to less than a million dollars per community. It actually works out to $868,878 per community; that is less than a million.

The territorial government put in last year $81,702,000, which works out to almost $2,500,000 per community. Statistics show that our population in the Northwest Territories is half Indigenous, half Caucasian. What that shows me is that the territorial government is actually putting in more money towards Indigenous housing. I do not know the stats of Indigenous people in housing programs, but I do know in my past history working with marginalized families that the majority of families that suffer, and I think that might be across, are actually Indigenous. That is not okay, but that is the reality.

What I do think is that the Government of the Northwest Territories is putting in more than its share towards the Indigenous housing in the territories. In fact, we are putting in eight times what normal provinces are doing. Usually, provinces are putting in 1 to 2 per cent of their income. We are putting in eight times that. I think we are doing a lot towards supporting Indigenous housing. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

I was not going to get into Members' statements here, but Mr. Speaker, my point is I do believe that the original housing has evolved into the NWT Housing Corporation. What was originally on the NWT Housing Corporation, which created 2,000 units that were built under programs that were directly built by Department of Indian Affairs, was given to the NWT Housing Corporation, and that is how the NWT Housing Corporation started. The original intent was to continue to house Indigenous people with the NWT Housing Corporation. It has evolved into something else. I would like to ask the Minister if she can commit to working with the Dene Nation to see where common ground can be reached for funding for housing in the Northwest Territories.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Currently, the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation does have a community initiative that we work with municipal and Aboriginal governments to kind of look at how we can work together towards providing more housing in their communities. Quite a few of the communities have come forward and are putting things like land or labour on the table. Therefore, we are putting things like material on the table. I am more than willing to work with any government that is willing to look at a kind of partnership model.

In regards to meeting with any specific Aboriginal government or nation at this point, in regards to the housing, I think it is a little bit premature. At this point, we are still trying to clarify where the Government of Canada is going with the housing strategy. The housing strategy was supposed to come out in November of this year. We were supposed to have a federal-provincial-territorial meeting in November. That has now been pushed back to December. I do know that, in the last fiscal year, there was funding directly provided to the Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, which is an Aboriginal government.

At this point, I do not know where the Government of Canada is going to put the housing monies to; so I think it is a bit premature to meet with any Indigenous government until that is clarified from the Government of Canada.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

The NWT Housing Corporation has existed for 40 plus years. I think it would not be premature. Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Minister, then, if she can direct staff to do some research on the background of how the Housing Corporation has evolved originally from funding that flow to the Department of Indian Affairs and then eventually to the GNWT through the vehicle of the NWT Housing Corporation.

I recognize that GNWT does fund money that supports the Housing Corporation and that the money flowing from Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation is combined with that. However, I think the original intent was to house First Nations. I do believe that global agreements --

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Member, what is your line of questioning?

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Will the Minister agree to direct staff to research the history of social housing in the NWT? Thank you.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

I would like to remind Members to shorten your preamble and also to answer in short answers. Minister responsible for the NWT Housing Corporation.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I do want to make a clarification. In my answer before, I had said that we were half-Indigenous and half-Caucasian. That is incorrect. I have been corrected from the other side of the House, and they are absolutely right. We are about half Indigenous and half non-Indigenous. I do clarify that there are other people within our territory as well.

In regards to directing the staff to look into the history of the social housing, I will make my answer short and say yes. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in the research, I am asking the Minister if she is willing to go back to the 1950s to when the first housing was built by Indian Affairs in the Northwest Territories. Thank you

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Yes, I will direct the staff to go back to the very original to see where the housing was, how many houses were turned over, and I will ask them to actually do research on the actual $28 million that is provided from the Government of Canada and to see if that money is actually being distributed properly, because maybe I am wrong. Maybe less than a million dollars a community is more than we are actually spending in Indigenous community, although I have a feeling that we are actually spending a lot more than less than a million per community per year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 42-18(3): Support For Indigenous Housing
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in follow-up to my Member's statement, I have a few questions for the Minister responsible for the Housing Corporation. Mr. Speaker, can the Minister provide a status update on the construction and delivery of modular units throughout the Northwest Territories communities? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. So, the delivery of modular units throughout the whole Northwest Territories, that has kind of kicked me off. I am going to try to answer this. My belief is that we had 19 constructed, to be constructed with Concept Energy, and one to be constructed with the Energy Wall here, in Yellowknife. So, we have eight that are partially built with Concept, and we have one completed with Energy Wall. We have four that are delivered to communities at this point, we will still need some work on, so at this point we are still short some, but I cannot do the math at this point.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, can the Minister describe the comparison in costs and anticipated lifespan for modular units versus stick-built homes?

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

The lifespan of all of our units within the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation is about 40 years, so whether they are a modular unit or a stick-built unit, we do try to provide repairs and upgrades to make sure that they can last as long as they can. Some units of course suffer higher damage through a variety of reasons and so they do not make the lifespan of 40 years, but we do try to make sure that all units are repaired or upkept to meet that 40-year lifespan.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, increasing employment in our small communities is a priority for this government. It is a big item in our mandate, and the Housing Corporation has a role to play. How is the corporation planning its delivery of programs and services to create jobs and opportunities for residents, for instance in construction and maintenance?

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

The Northwest Territories Housing Corporation, it was kind of interesting when I started this position. My understanding as the Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation was that I was to put houses on the ground. It was a short time later that I realized that actually a large percentage of the Housing Corporation's money does go to providing employment in communities. Not only do we provide jobs for maintaining and building units. We have 23 local housing organizations in communities that we provide support for, too, so a huge amount of our money is actually going towards employing people in the Northwest Territories. Perhaps a question that I am going to put out there that I would have liked to have heard from the MLA is that are we going to continue with the houses in the North, the modular units. I will share right now, today, that we had some difficulty, actually, with barging the modular units into communities. So we learned from our mistakes, so what I have given direction is that, for communities that we have to barge into, we are going to try not to do modular units because of the barging difficulties.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, that is good news, but, you know, the Minister states that they are putting a lot of employment into the communities, but just to set the record straight, one building stick-built homes we have in the neighbourhood of five to six people working on one unit, whereas putting these modular homes into our communities, seeing first-hand when they brought the ones to Tsiigehtchic, we had probably two people who worked for one day to bring these units up the hill. Mr. Speaker, you do the math. The Minister may have a little trouble with this, but, you know, five to six months of employment for five people is no comparison to two days for most likely the same operator, as well, Mr. Speaker. So that is good news because they are barging into Tsiigehtchic, Fort McPherson, and Aklavik, so I am hoping that in the future we are doing stick-built homes. Will the Minister please confirm that?

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

It is important to note that the modular units that are currently being delivered are built within the Northwest Territories, and my ambition is to have northern-built homes for northern people, so that is my priority, and I have still stuck to it. As stated in my previous answer, communities that have barges, we are looking at a different model of building because of the difficulty getting modular units onto barges. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 43-18(3): Modular Public Housing Units
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. My question is for the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources. Later today, we will be debating a motion about development in the calving grounds of one of our migratory caribou herds. The Bathurst caribou herd has plummeted from a high of 472,000 animals to 16,000. Indigenous governments have voluntarily halted harvesting, yet nothing has been done in terms of habitat protection. Can the Minister give us an update on the status of the Bathurst herd and whether there are any signs of recovery? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Bathurst caribou herd did decline to about 19,800 caribou in 2015. It was a 96 per cent decline from peak numbers estimated, as the Member pointed out, 472,000. The herd was fairly stable 2009-12, but declined further 2012-2015. A calving photo survey will provide an updated population estimate, and it is planned for June of 2018, and then management will be revisited once a new herd estimate is known.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks to the Minister for that. I take it from his response that there is no signs of recovery. GNWT has been leading a range-planning exercise for the Bathurst caribou herd, and I commended the Minister in the House for this work back in March of this year. Can the Minister give us a status report on this range-planning exercise and when we can expect to see a concrete plan and some actions to protect the Bathurst herd and its habitat?

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, first of all, I need to commend some of the Aboriginal groups that are taking it upon themselves to preserve the caribou. I think just in the news lately, recently, there was a historic wildlife management agreement signed by seven Indigenous groups in Quebec that wanted to protect the caribou in Ungava Peninsula, and I think that takes a great deal of leadership. So they decided that they would do that on their own. The Porcupine Caribou Management Board also has taken an active role in the protection of the caribou in their area. The Member is right; we will be debating that motion later on today.

The working group met in late September to review a draft of the Bathurst caribou range plan, and the draft plan is based on the best available traditional knowledge and science and makes recommendations for managing disturbance to caribou. The draft plan will be presented to the Minister and Committee-of-Cabinet on Economy and Environment in November and will go out for public engagement.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks to the Minister for that update. It was very helpful. Protection of NWT caribou herds is a complex matter as there are a number of communities that have traditionally harvested herds, most migrate between the NWT and Nunavut, there are different management regimes on each side of the boundary, and very little habitat has any permanent protection. That raises the issue of whether our government has any policy or position on resource development within calving grounds. Can the Minister say whether our government has a position or policy on resource development within caribou calving grounds?

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, GNWT has concerns about potential adverse impacts of projects on the population and habitat of transboundary wildlife species while recognizing the potential benefit of any proposed projects. Calving grounds are widely considered, both from a scientific and traditional knowledge perspective, as the most sensitive habitat for migratory barren-ground caribou herds, and so we do take very seriously and look at very closely any projects that are happening within the calving grounds. As the Member noted, we need to do what we can do to protect those calving grounds. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President, and thanks to the Minister for that. It sort of sounds like we handled this matter on a case-by-case basis. The next case, though, has come up before us. Grays Bay Road and Port Project will cut through the remaining calving grounds for the Bathurst caribou herd. GNWT did not object in principle to the project, and support a less rigorous review.

A review by a panel under federal legislation would have given us an opportunity to appoint individuals to that panel, would have guaranteed participant funding while still reporting to the same Minister, as a new to impact review board-led review. Can the Minister provide an explanation as to why our government supports a less rigorous review process for the Grays Bay project, where our rights and interests are less likely to be heard? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The GNWT recommended further review and left the decision to the Nunavut Impact Review Board. We felt that the decision for a northern project would be best handled by the North. While there is potential for a federal panel that included GNWT reps, under the land claims agreement, the panel members are appointed by the Nunavut minister and federal minister and there would be no guarantee of NWT representation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 44-18(3): Caribou Calving Grounds
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, when I was back home during our break here, I ran into a number of constituents and they were asking about the Employment and Family Assistance Program, and asking for clarification on how it worked. I tried to explain as best I could, but can I get the Minister to please provide us with a brief explanation of how the program works? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Finance.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The Employment and Family Assistance Program is a confidential, voluntary-based counselling and referral service available to all GNWT employees and their dependents, to assist with a wide range of personal and work-related issues. The Employment and Family Assistance Program offers a wide range of services, including a variety of mental health services, and can be accessed 24 hours a day. The service allows people to discuss personal problems and concerns in an understanding and professional environment, away from the workplace. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I apologize for not directing my question to the Finance Minister. Thank you for that. Mr. Speaker, I thank the Minister for his answer; however, when I am talking to these people and we're talking about the treatment and that, they've informed me that they have to take sick leave to attend counselling and stuff like that, and this is now an added stress on to people who do not have the sick leave available to them. Can the Minister confirm if this is the process, and if it is, why?

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

My understanding is sick leave is used specifically for these purposes. That's why they accumulate sick leave that way, if they have to go out for some type of treatment. If they're away for treatment for a medical condition, sick leave can be advanced if no credits are available, up to 15 days and, if needed, employees can also ask for a payout of annual leave, experiencing financial hardship with being on sick leave without pay.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. I guess it disappoints me that we as a government, and we're doing some really good things with our programs and providing these treatments and trying to help our staff people, but unfortunately, now you have to take your annual and sick leave to deal with it. That's disappointing. Can the Minister please advise this House how supervisors are educating and training on working with staff who are going through a counselling process?

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. First of all, I think I need to point out that this government cares very much about the well-being of its employees, and takes every opportunity to work with them to try and improve their conditions or whatever it is that they may be going through. The collective agreement has a number of provisions in there for different types of leave, so we work with those.

As far as the supervisors trained on working with staff, the accommodation process involves cooperation between the GNWT unions and employees to identify safe, timely, and reasonable measures to accommodate employees. The goal of the accommodation is to have employees remain in the workforce or, if absent, integrated back into the workforce as soon as reasonably and safely possible.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank the Minister for that answer. I totally agree that the Government of the Northwest Territories is trying to do what's best for their staff, and at no point in time am I saying they're not. However, I guess my concern is, in listening to the constituents out there, there's a variety of challenges that people are dealing with and they're getting counselling out there, so they're not getting the needed support out there. Can the Minister please advise the process if the staff feels that their supervisor is not treating or understanding their challenges properly? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Duty-to-accommodate training is provided to managers and supervisors who provide them with the guidance and tools to manage and support employees in the workplace who are dealing with any type of medical condition. Advice and guidance is also provided to managers by the duty-to-accommodate advisors, and managers also have access to training sessions on managing and supporting employees dealing with medical conditions. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 45-18(3): Employment Family Assistance Program
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, what is the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs' plan to close the funding gap that we've learned about through the municipal funding review? Thank you.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We are in the process of developing a long-term plan to address the funding gap for municipalities. That is a commitment. Currently what we are doing is every year, there has been an increase in some of the areas from the territorial governments, and we are leveraging with the federal government's monies to access more infrastructure money.

Communities that are at a surplus currently have been kind of topped, or are staying at that level, and then we are focusing on the communities that have a deficit with the new monies that we are bringing in. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Is the Minister committed to tabling that strategy in the fall at some point? This is the last day of our sitting. Is the Minister going to table that strategy today?

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

No, I am sorry, we are still working on the finalization of the long-term plan, so I do apologize if I made a commitment that I would table it in the fall. I wish I would have said that we will be completing it in the fall, and not mentioning when I would table it.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Speaker, the longer the government waits to figure this out, the more pressure is going to be put on our communities who are in those deficit positions. The residents of Yellowknife are short-changed by $1 million in funding from this government, and the taxpayers have to foot the bill with the most recent City of Yellowknife budget increasing taxes because there is not enough money to pay for these essential programs the city is working on. Does the Minister think that is fair?

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

As stated earlier, the Department of Municipal and Community Affairs has actually been working quite diligently with the federal government to leverage the infrastructure monies that are coming. Communities such as the City of Yellowknife are actually getting a substantial amount of the federal infrastructure monies, whereas other communities who have a surplus are not getting that amount, so I am not a hundred per cent convinced that any tax increases to the residents of Yellowknife are only because of the $1-million shortfall.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It is not the federal government's responsibility to fund our communities. It is this government's responsibility. The city's budgets are done on a calendar year. Can the Minister commit to getting this work done before the end of the calendar year so the city can have certainty about what their fiscal room is going to look like?

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

No, I cannot. I would have to actually talk with the department and see. I want a complete plan, not a plan that is rushed to meet political viewpoints, so I will make sure that the plan is done properly before we release that plan. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 46-18(3): Municipalities Funding Gap
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, earlier today the Premier said that the Cabinet had heard clearly from Members about their frustrations and concerns. Mr. Speaker, I have brought up a legitimate, fact-based problem with the speed of legislation being introduced in this Legislative Assembly. What I got in return was a denial that there is a problem and no offer to take up my offer to discuss this with the other Members of this House, so I want to ask the Premier again: will he work with Caucus to look at convening a short sitting in December so that additional bills can be introduced for review prior to the budget session? Mahsi.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In my response, I made sure that all options were open, and I said that I would review the legislative agenda and we would take whatever actions would be required to make sure that we fulfilled our agenda, our very ambitious agenda. That did not preclude meeting with Caucus to review. We all know the process. The only one who can call or reconvene the Legislative Assembly would be the call of the Speaker.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I am aware of the process, but it would start with the Caucus. So how is the Premier going to consult with Regular Members on the issue of speeding up the process of introducing new legislation?

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

First of all, I would review our legislative agenda. I would review every proposal. I would review every timeline, and I would review the resources that we have available, and we would review that with Caucus.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, the next Caucus meeting is February 7, 2018, so at what point will this review involve the Regular Members?

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

We would undertake a government review, and, as soon as that is completed, we are, MLAs are, meeting on a regular basis, so we would try to fit into that agenda and timetable.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Could the Premier tell us when the results of this review will be available and whether he will make them available to Regular Members?

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

As soon as our government and our officials have been able to review the legislative agenda and as soon as we can determine the timelines and the proposed schedules, we would develop a critical path. I expect that we will be able to meet with Caucus at that point. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 47-18(3): Legislative Progress
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Colleagues, I would like to draw your attention to visitors in the gallery. We have with us Language Commissioner Shannon Gullberg. Welcome to our Assembly. Also with us we have council members with a chief here today, Paul Betsina and Bobby Drygeese. Masi for joining us. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this is our last sitting day, so I would like to get some more information out to the public on the progress on the Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy. I will go back to the fish plant. We have got the money in the budget now. The Minister said that Infrastructure is taking the lead on this, so when can we expect the ground to break on this project? Even better, when can we expect this to be operational, this new fish plant? Thank you.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I said, we are in the planning stage right now, figuring this out. The department is the lead. Hopefully, we will be able to break ground in the spring.

As I said, I think we have some property identified moving forward and working with the Town of Hay River. I suspect construction will probably take at least a year for a facility that size.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

So it looks like it will be operational summer 2019, from what the Minister has stated. Will we be able to do both primary and secondary processing in the new fish plant?

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, as we move forward working with the fishing federation, primarily right now we will be doing exactly what Freshwater did, was to be able to do the primary sourcing of fish, cutting up round, and filleting. As far as doing secondary processing, that is going to be entirely up to what Freshwater wants to do moving forward.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

I hope the Minister did not mean it when he said we are going to do exactly what Freshwater was doing. Another element of the revitalization strategy is the training program.

I know there have been talks with different organizations about training, not just for fishermen, but for people in the marine industry, as well, so where are we in terms of creating a training program to revitalize the fishery?

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

We are working with a number of people on moving this forward. The first part of it is what do we need to have the existing fishermen trained up to participate in fishing on the lake and have all the qualifications needed to do that.

We are also looking at a second part of how do we bring new, younger fishermen into the process, what type of training they need to be able to access the lake and do it in a safe manner. We are looking at a different approach, as well, with a number of other proponents about how we can bring training to the fishing industry in the Northwest Territories.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Still just a lot of looking at things, it sounds like, so, while the department is looking at things, I know the fishermen have been fishing, so can the Minister give us an update about how much production has been on the lake, what percentage of the quota or how many pounds have been taken off the lake this year?

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

I don't think we have the full details on the catch, but from everything I have heard to date, it sounds like it is very similar to last year's quota. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 48-18(3): Commercial Fisheries Revitalization Strategy
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Time for oral questions has expired. Item 8, written questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Written Question 2-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Modular Units Construction
Written Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation.

In announcing the decision to Concept Energy Services to supply modular housing units, the Minister indicated that the units could be provided at a cost 25 to 48 per cent lower than by stick-built construction. Contracts are now being let to complete construction of modular units at additional costs. Can the Minister tell this House what the additional costs for completion of the units delivered unfinished to communities will be, and:

1. whether modular construction will in fact be cheaper than community-based stick built construction, given the need to pay contractors to complete the buildings;

2. whether the original calculation of construction cost savings included the payment of a cash advance to Concept Energy Services;

3. the amount of any advance and the contract conditions to be met in return for the advance; and;

4. given that providing cash advances to contractors is not the normal practice of the Housing Corporation, why it was included in this contract.

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Written Question 2-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Modular Units Construction
Written Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Written questions. Item 9, returns to written questions. Item 10, replies to the Commissioner's opening address. Item 11, petitions. Item 12, reports of standing and special committees. Item 13, reports of committees on the review of bills. Item 14, tabling of documents. Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation.

Tabled Document 32-18(3): NWT Housing Corporation Annual Report 2016-2017
Tabling of Documents

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents entitled "Towards Level Ground: Addressing Persistent Core Need in the Northwest Territories" and the "NWT Housing Corporation Annual Report 2016-2017." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 32-18(3): NWT Housing Corporation Annual Report 2016-2017
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Tabling of documents. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Tabled Document 33-18(3): Aurora College Corporate Plan 2017-2018
Tabling of Documents

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the follow document entitled "Aurora College Corporate Plan 2017-2018." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 33-18(3): Aurora College Corporate Plan 2017-2018
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Infrastructure.

Tabled Document 34-18(3): Yellowknife Airport Five-Year Business Plan 2017-2018 To 2021-2022
Tabling of Documents

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the follow document entitled "Yellowknife Airport Five-Year Business Plan 2017-2018 to 2021-2022." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 34-18(3): Yellowknife Airport Five-Year Business Plan 2017-2018 To 2021-2022
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. The Honourable Premier.

Tabled Document 35-18(3): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 770-18(2): Mental Health And Homecare Funding
Tabling of Documents

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the follow document entitled "Follow-Up Letter for Oral Question 770-18(2): Mental Health and Homecare Funding." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 35-18(3): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 770-18(2): Mental Health And Homecare Funding
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents.

Tabled Document 38-18(3): Summary Of Members' Absences For The Period September 19 To October 18, 2017
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Pursuant to Section 23 of the Official Languages Act, I wish to table the "Office of the Northwest Territories Languages Commissioner Annual Report 2016-2017." Again, I wish to draw your attention to Members present in the gallery, Language Commissioner, Ms. Shannon Gullberg. Thanks for being with us.

Colleagues, pursuant to Section 40.23(2) of the Public Service Act, I wish to table the "Annual Report of the Equal Pay Commissioner of the Northwest Territories for the Period July 1, 2016 to June 14, 2017."

Pursuant to Section 5 of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act, I wish to table the "Summary of Members' Absences for the Period September 19 to October 18, 2017." Masi. Item 15, notices of motion. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Motion 8-13(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service
Notices of Motion

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I give notice that on Tuesday, October 24, 2017, I will move the following motion: now therefore I move, seconded by the Honourable Member for Yellowknife Centre, that this Legislative Assembly expresses its sincere gratitude to Mr. Douglas Schauerte for his dedicated and exemplary service to the House; and further, that this Legislative Assembly designate Douglas Schauerte as an honorary officer of this Legislative Assembly with an entry to the Chamber and a seat at the table.

Mr. Speaker, at the appropriate time, I will be seeking unanimous consent to deal with this motion today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Motion 8-13(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service
Notices of Motion

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Item 16, notices of motion for first reading of bills. Item 17, motions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion "Apology and Compensation to the Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating to Damages from the Giant Mine."

WHEREAS the Yellowknives Dene First Nation abused and occupied the lands and waters around Yellowknife Bay for thousands of years and continue to do so;

AND WHEREAS the workings of Giant Mine were located in their territory without compensation or permission from the Yellowknife Dene First Nation;

WHEREAS the operation of Giant Mine contaminated the lands and waters surrounding the water to the extent that some traditional activities including hunting, fishing, and gathering by the Yellowknives Dene First Nation had been harmed and potentially will never again be possible;

AND WHEREAS the massive stockpiles of arsenic created by the Giant Mine threatened to cause a major environmental catastrophe that could prevent Yellowknives Dene First Nations' usage of its traditional lands and water;

AND WHEREAS the treaty entitlement and lands right agreement has yet to be completed with Yellowknives Dene First Nation and that the impact and damages created by Giant Mine are an extraordinary and exceptional nature;

AND WHEREAS on July 1, 2017, the Prime Minister of Canada publicly stated that "Indigenous peoples of this country have faced oppression for centuries and as a society, we must acknowledge and apologize for past wrongs and chart a plan forward for the next 150 years;"

AND WHEREAS the Giant Mine oversight board in its 2017 establishment report recommended that in the interest of reconciliation, "the decisions and actions of past governments are acknowledged and that an apology is made for the impacts of these decisions and actions have had on the Yellowknives Dene First nation;"

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable for Frame Lake that the Legislative Assembly calls upon the government of Canada to make a formal public apology for the damage done by Giant Mine, and more specifically to the Yellowknives Dene First Nation;

AND FURTHER that the Assembly call upon the government of Canada to enter into negotiations with the Yellowknife Dene First Nation to provide compensation for these damages and loss.

AND FURTHERMORE that the Premier of the Northwest Territories convey this motion without delay to the Prime Minister of Canada with a letter requesting a reply.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to request a recorded vote.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. There is a motion in order. To the motion. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. A short addition to this: to speak to the motion, we have known that the issue of the arsenic at Giant Mine and all of the other contamination damage around the area has caused problems for many years. For the Yellowknives First Nation, I know that the elders had spoken previously about when they were fishing right in the bay. I remember when the Ndilo was a smaller community at the time. Right in the front, the elders would fish right in the bay back there until they started to see lesions and other types of problems with the fish and so on.

Now that they're saying there is some contamination in all the birds and all the fish in the area, and I think we all know that the vaults of arsenic that are underground, frozen underground around the Giant Mine property has potential for great catastrophe, if there should be anything going wrong in there. So we felt that there was a time for the federal government to discuss their responsibilities with what occurred at Giant Mine. When the mine was first created, it was done without a thorough consultation with the people from Yellowknives Dene First Nation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Frame Lake.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I've been at a lot of meetings about Giant Mine over the last 30 years, and certainly whenever I've been at meetings where there have been elders from the Yellowknives Dene First Nation, they've raised this issue of an apology and compensation. They've been waiting a long time for that to happen, and unfortunately some of them are no longer with us.

How do you explain to somebody who used to be able to go to the lake and take water out of it that they actually now have to pay to get safe water delivered to their house? So why is this motion before us today? I think the Giant Mine Oversight Board erased this issue in their first report, and I asked the Minister of Environment and Natural Resources in this House whether our government had a position on this, and he said, "Well, not really. We haven't thought about it very much."

This motion, I think, is an expression of our collective will, moving forward, and to get this on the federal radar. An apology and compensation is important. It's very significant, an unfinished piece of business, and this needs to be done in the spirit of reconciliation. There's nothing in legislation that would prevent another Giant Mine from happening. There are a lot of lessons that we still need to learn, and we need to implement those lessons through our post-devolution legislation.

This issue will continue to give the mining industry a black eye, but there are progressive people in the mining industry. They recognize that, and they want this issue dealt with, as well. That's what this motion is about, is helping put this issue on to the federal radar and getting this issue dealt with properly and the way that it should be. I look forward to the support of all Members of this House. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Kam Lake.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I stand in support of this motion and I'd like to commend the honourable Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh for bringing this forward. A reconciliation is more than words. It requires real action from governments; not just ours, but governments across Canada and, of course, the federal government. We've seen a lot of movement towards repairing the relationship between Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in the country. It's a long road ahead. It may take hundreds of years to get us to a place where we have healed the wounds of colonization, and restored the balance in this country. For this motion in particular, it speaks to something that's very near and dear to the hearts of Yellowknives Dene First People, their traditional territory that has been severely impacted by the Giant Mine facility.

Yes, it is a historical incident, but it has forever changed the history of the Northwest Territories. If we're going to speak to reconciliation, if we're going to talk about building strong partnerships with Indigenous nations of the Northwest Territories, we have to do more than just make Members' statements on it. We have to put it into practice with formal motions like these that call on specific actions, and I encourage all Members, all honourable Members of this House, to stand up in support when the vote is called. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 5-18(3): Apology And Compensation To The Yellowknives Dene First Nation Relating To Damages From The Giant Mine, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. The Member has requested a recorded vote. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Deputy Clerk Of The House (Mr. Schauerte)

Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Member for Nahendeh. Member for Frame Lake. Member for Yellowknife Centre. Member for Nunakput. Member for Inuvik Boot Lake. Member for Range Lake. Member for Yellowknife South. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes. Member for Hay River South. Member for Thebacha. Member for Hay River North. Member for Mackenzie Delta. Member for Yellowknife North. Member for Kam Lake.

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the vote: 16 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Colleagues, at this time, I'm going to call a short break.

---SHORT RECESS

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi, Members. Members, we left off on the first motion, 5-18(3). That was completed. Motions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

WHEREAS the Porcupine caribou herd has sustained Gwich'in people for thousands of years;

AND WHEREAS part of the critical calving habitat for the Porcupine caribou is located within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge that does not have permanent protection;

AND WHEREAS the Government of the Northwest Territories has actively supported previous efforts towards permanent protection of the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge;

AND WHEREAS the current United States Federal Government is making public statements about lifting the protection for the Porcupine caribou Heritage herd through the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, that this Legislative Assembly calls upon the Government of Canada to make representations to the United States Federal Government opposing the removal of protection for the Porcupine caribou herd by allowing any industrial activities within the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge;

AND FURTHER, that this Assembly calls upon the Government of the Northwest Territories to actively support and assist Gwich'in governments and related organizations in the effort to prevent the opening of Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, and to seek permanent protection of this critical habitat for the Porcupine caribou herd.

AND FURTHERMORE that the Premier of the NWT convey this motion without delay to the Prime Minster of Canada with a letter requesting a reply. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. I'll allow the mover to speak on the motion.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, like many First Nations throughout the Northwest Territories, the Gwich'in people have relied on the Porcupine caribou herd, along with other herds throughout the territory. Mr. Speaker, all Dene in the NWT are also part of the Porcupine caribou management agreement. Even though the Porcupine caribou herd is one of the healthiest herds in Canada and in the United States, as well, you know that future drilling, if allowed in 1002 lands is what this motion is speaking to.

It can have huge impacts on the Porcupine caribou herd. We see it throughout all the herds in Canada that are declining at the moment, yet the Porcupine caribou herd is healthy at the moment, but future drilling can have impacts on this, as well. That is the calving grounds of the Porcupine caribou herd, Mr. Speaker, and now is the time we need to stand up again. You know, this fight has gone on for many years in the Gwich'in, in the Yukon, Alaska, and the Northwest Territories have always been lobbying the Congress and senators in the United States to protect their calving grounds. I'd just like to read the latest update that I received.

"The Senate passed its budget resolution, which directs the Senate Natural Resource Committee, chaired by Alaska Senator Murkowski, to generate $1 billion in new revenues. This is expected to be found by removing the legislative barriers to drilling in the coastal plain, and counting highly speculative revenues from the future sale of oil leases. The Senate vote happened largely along party lines, with the budget resolution passing 51 out of 52 Republicans to 49, all 48 Democrats, and one Republican. Earlier in the evening, Democratic Senator Maria Cantwell tabled a proposed amendment to the budget resolution, which had passed. Whatever moved the direction to the Senate Natural Resources Committee and thus ending the drilling threat in the budget, it did not pass, with 48 votes in favour, democrats, and 52 against, republicans. Last week, the House passed its own budget resolution which also directed its equivalent of the Senate Natural Resource Committee to find $5 billion in new revenues, example, $4 billion more than the Senate budget resolution. Most of these budget resolutions are not legally binding. They are also substantially different budget resolutions."

As I understand the archaic U.S. political process over the course of the next few weeks, the House and Senate will begin negotiations to reconcile the two budget resolutions in a single bill, which will have to pass in the Senate before becoming law, 51 votes required.

Mr. Speaker, I understand that there is still the ability for the language that puts the coastal plain at risk to be removed from the bill prior to the final Senate vote. Given the outcome of the capital amendment vote, however, this will require a shift in position of a minimum of three Republican senators. Mr. Speaker, in the worst-case scenario, the Senate will pass a budget into law in the coming weeks that removes the provisions from the federal legislation which currently prohibits exploration and drilling for oil in the coastal plain. So Mr. Speaker, more than ever, this motion is very important, and we need lobbying of our Prime Minister to meet with the President of the United States. I know that he is pro-development, but Mr. Speaker, I think we also need to send a contingent down to Washington to lobby the senators. Like I said, we only need three to change their position.

We have a lot of people who depend on the Porcupine caribou in the Northwest Territories along with the Yukon, I know they are doing their part to send people down to lobby. I just ask for your support, and Mr. Speaker, I will request a recorded vote. Thank you.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm very happy to second the motion. There have been a number of motions over the past number of Assemblies on protection of the caribou and this is just another one, but I think now, more than ever, it is quite critical that we follow through on this one because as the Member pointed out, I had exactly the same stats on the amendment that was made that was defeated that would have taken the Arctic wildlife refuge, the last wildlife refuge, out of it.

As the Member pointed out, it failed, and so there are two more people who need to be convinced. I do know that there are some representatives from, I think, one of the northern Yukon communities who are going down to Ottawa to try and change the minds down there. I do know that in the past, there have been a number of efforts by people of the Beaudel and Alaska and the Yukon to go down and point out the fact that they need to protect that particular -- because it's a different country and the volatility of the present administration in the United States, it makes it more critical than ever that we increase our efforts to try and make them aware of exactly what kind of effect that it's going to have.

I agree with the Member: the caribou sustained the people of the North Slope and the Yukon and the Beaudel for years, and I've been a benefactor of the caribou, Members have been benefactors of the caribou, our children have been benefactors of the caribou, our grandchildren are starting to be benefactors of the fact that we have the ability to still harvest caribou, and we want their grandchildren to have that ability as well.

I have said before earlier in the House when I was responding to some questions that I give kudos to any Aboriginal government that shows leadership in protection of caribou across this country because that will ensure the survival of the caribou once the Aboriginal governments take it upon themselves and self-regulate themselves. The Tlicho government has done that and kudos to them. The seven Indigenous groups I spoke of earlier in Ungava Peninsula in around Quebec have taken leadership roles. I think it is extremely important that we continue to support this and we continue to try and get down and do some lobbying efforts and see if we can convince some people that this is an area that needs to be protected. I am very pleased again to the seconder of this motion. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

To the motion. Member for Frame Lake.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Yes, I would like to strongly support this motion. I want to recognize the people who have done a lot of work on this. I am not going to name them all, but certainly the human faces. This has been a lifetime struggle for many of them, people like Norma Kassi, Joe Tetlichi, Charlie Snowshoe, the late chief Johnny Charlie. This has been a lifetime struggle trying to protect the caribou herd. I want to recognize their efforts and leadership on this issue. I know that our government is going to get behind this as well and provide support and assistance. I am sure it is going to get unanimous support in this House. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

To the motion. Member for Nunakput.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as a neighboring MLA for the Member from Mackenzie Delta, I support this motion as well too. Mr. Speaker, this is a good opportunity for the Gwich'in settlement region as well as the Gwich'in International which is in Alaska, the Aleutians, and the GNWT. I think we are all in the right place to partner up to bring this to the level of the Arctic Council as well as to the United Nations.

Mr. Speaker, all those avenues are key to slowing down a process like this that maybe moved by another government that is out of our control and out of our reach. We are working with the Government of Northwest Territories and the government of Canada. I think with all those avenues, we can have a strong voice together at that level. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

To the motion.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 6-18(3): Action On The Alaska National Wildlife Refuge, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. The Member requested a recorded vote. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Deputy Clerk Of The House (Mr. Schauerte)

The Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Yellowknife South, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, and the Member for Thebacha.

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the motion are: 16 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to deal with the motion I gave notice of earlier today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Unanimous consent granted

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Let's try that again.

WHEREAS Douglas Schauerte was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Legislative Assembly in 1995;

AND WHEREAS Mr. Schauerte has provided devoted and exemplary public service to the Legislative Assembly for more than 30 years;

AND WHEREAS during Mr. Schauerte's 10 years as Deputy Clerk, the system of democratic and responsible government in the Northwest Territories has undergone rapid and significant change;

AND WHEREAS Mr. Schauerte will retire as Deputy Clerk of the Legislative Assembly on October 20, 2017;

AND WHEREAS it is customary for Legislative Assemblies to recognize and express their gratitude for such long and distinguished service;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Yellowknife Centre that the Legislative Assembly expresses its sincere gratitude to Mr. Douglas Schauerte for the dedicated and exemplary service to this House;

AND FURTHER that the Legislative Assembly designates Douglas Schauerte as an honorary officer of this Legislative Assembly with the entry into the Chamber and a seat at the table. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

There is a motion in order. To the motion? Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, just very quickly, I got elected into the House in 2014 and I have had the opportunity to work with Mr. Schauerte. I have seen the work that he does and trying to keep his all in order. As we have just seen recently today, I think it is time to retire him. He is getting all the ridings mixed up.

---Laughter

That is starting to make me wonder if he even knew what the ridings were.

---Laughter

As member of the board of management and the Minister of Finance, I think it is going to be a cost-saving measure to this, too, because Doug runs up and down the hall so many times. I don't even know how many times we have had to change carpet in a year.

---Laughter

We will be able to save some money in that. It also set him up well for his next line of work when he moves down to Saskatchewan. He is going to be a cat herder because he has had a lot of practice over the last number of years. We do appreciate the work that you have done and we look forward to the opportunity of seeing you here at this table again. Thank you.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. I will allow the seconder to make comments on the motion.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Friendly, helpful, knowledgeable, dependable, accommodating, those are the words that come to mind when we talk about Doug. He is the person that we Regular Members see every sitting morning at nine o'clock who walks us through what the day will be about and how we need to prepare for it.

He is unfailingly helpful. He has an incredible knowledge of procedure and the history of this Assembly, a tremendous amount of corporate knowledge that he takes with him when he retires. He is always accommodating; nothing is too much trouble. He is always a constructive force in our meetings. I will miss him tremendously, but I wish him well in his retirement. Mahsi.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Frame Lake.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I think this motion really deserves some very serious debate. I look forward to some comments here, but no, more seriously, we often don't get to recognize our staff. This is one of the few occasions we actually get to do that. Thank you, Doug, for over 30 years of service.

You are an encyclopedia of knowledge. You have this uncanny knack of enabling us to get the best out of ourselves seriously. Personally, you have provided some very solid advice to me. You have made my re-entry back into political life a lot easier. I sincerely wish you all the best with your next phase of your life and you always have a special place in this House. Mahsi.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Kam Lake.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, will rise to commend the long service Mr. Schauerte has given to this institution and to us, in particular, on the Regular Members' side. I may have studied politics before I got here, but I certainly did not know how the sausage was made, and Doug is an excellent sausage-maker.

Other Members may know, since I have been here over the last two years, I have thoroughly enjoyed learning our procedures and practices here, and one thing I am going to miss most about Doug leaving is arguing with him over how best to do those policies and practices and always throwing him a curveball of "Hey, why don't we try this," and then Doug saying, "No, no, let's not do that at all." I will miss that, but I do know that 30 years under the dome in a hectic political support role must have been a long career, and he must be looking forward to that retirement now. I know he will be back, and there will always be a seat at the table for him. Thank you very much for your service, Mr. Schauerte.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Yellowknife North.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I have had the privilege of knowing Doug and the Schauerte family for many years, but I never knew Doug on a professional level. I can certainly say that, when you are a newly elected MLA, just walking into the front doors of this building can be daunting and sometimes intimidating. There is nothing more special than meeting the never-ending warm smile of Doug Schauerte. It is not just us here in this House who owe you a debt of gratitude. You have given 30 years to an institute as fine as ours is. We are all a part of the Canadian Federation, and so I think that Canadians as a whole owe you a debt of gratitude for your commitment to public service. Thank you.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, feel like I have known Doug for a long, long, long time. I have seen Doug in here, and when I arrived here elected in 2007, Doug was a real big help to me. In addition to that, I have known Doug's family for a long time and worked with his late mother. She was responsible for teaching me a whole bunch of things about the Housing Corporation and about how to be an employee of the Government of the Northwest Territories a long, long time ago. I have often talked about Doug's mom with Doug, and I guess, when I met her, Doug was most likely in high school. It seems like I have just known Doug forever since I first came to Yellowknife in 1979. It was an honour to work with you, Doug. Thank you.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Nahendeh.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, stand up here to support this motion. I have had the pleasure of knowing Doug since way back when, playing sports. I considered him a friend, even though we were from Hay River and Yellowknife, and we had some really heated battles on the sports field. After that, it was a really good friendship.

One thing I'm going to really be thankful now is that now he can call me "Shane" instead of "Mr. Thompson" every time he talks to me. His professionalism was amazing. He would sit there. As soon as I got elected, it was Mr. Thompson. I go, "Hey, Doug, it's Shane. You know, it's me." He goes, "No, Mr. Thompson. I need to talk to you" -- and he was very good at helping us get to where we are here today.

He has gone through eight Assemblies. I mean, that is amazing. Eight Assemblies, and he has made a very big huge impact. A lot of the Members on the other side had the pleasure of working with him, whether it was through committee work or through the government system.

This institution is part of Doug, and I thank Doug for his service, not just to us, but to the residents of the Northwest Territories, and as my colleague said, the rest of Canada. Our uniqueness here is thanks to Doug and his ability to give us good advice and direction. I thank you, and we will sorely miss you in Assembly, but again, I will be very thankful when you start calling me "Shane" again. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Nunakput.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have known Doug since I was a teenager playing broomball, and we played at the national level, at the international level, and Doug was always a first-class sportsman all the way through, through winning, through losing, through tough times. I got to work with him for about a year, almost two years here, and there were some heated debates and some very good progressive ones as well. The most important thing that Doug has taught me in the last year and a half is patience, and I have sure needed it this week. I really appreciate that, Doug, and I wish you all the best. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Colleagues, as you can see, I am allowing first names in the House. This is a special occasion. It is personable and friendly. I will just continue with that. To the motion. Member for Sahtu.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, respect all the choice words as my previous colleagues have mentioned, and I think that the whole House feels heartfelt to the service that you have provided, Doug. As the previous colleague mentioned, this institution is you, and it is the other way around as well: you are part of this institution and always will be. As we say in some cases back home, "you're always welcome in my tepee." As a newcomer into this institution, I have seen you every morning and see the warm, comforting knowledge that comes with your presence there, and I can see why order was always kept in the previous eight Assemblies. I respect you, and I wish you all the best for yourself and your family. Come home and visit us once in a while. Mahsi.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today, this is a very special motion, and a very genuine motion for the clerk before us. It is a very special day, as well, in terms of celebrating and acknowledging the work, commitments, dedication, sacrifice from one of our own, Mr. Doug Schauerte, here at the House. He has committed himself and dedicated himself not only to what goes on in this House, but to Members, past and present, as well as residents of the Northwest Territories. He has been a mentor and a role model, not only to Members of the Legislative Assembly, but among his staff and his peers. I have seen this over the last six years being an elected Member of this House personally.

When I first got elected into the 17th Legislative Assembly, Doug was a very strong mentor and motivator to the Fab Five at the time -- the five of us who came in -- and showed us how things work in this House, encouraged us, and motivated us to be the best MLAs that we could be. He gave us direction. He gave us guidance, advice, and process that we could use to make the best decisions for residents of the Northwest Territories.

As the chair of Standing Committee of Social Programs, and as a Member of Government Operations in the 17th Assembly, as Members who were around knew, we had a very heavy schedule and agenda, and as the leader that Doug was, he stepped up to the plate. He jumped in when he knew that his clerk staff needed assistance and researchers needed assistance. He did not complain about it once. He came on the road with us. We had some pretty heavy bills that we had to take a look at, and we got them done. We got three big, significant bills done in the last year of the 17th Assembly which was pretty heavy, and we were not sure if we were going to be able to do it, but under his guidance and his commitment and the sacrifice that he made, we were able to do it for the people of the Northwest Territories.

Doug, when you are gone, there are definitely big shoes to fill, and a lot of experience and knowledge goes along with you. On behalf of Members, past and present, mahsi cho, quyanainni, merci beaucoup, and thank you. I hope you get to spend some quality time with your family in Saskatchewan. Mahsi.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Range Lake.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to acknowledge Doug Schauerte. I remember when I came into this building two years ago, and the most impressive thing I found was the light that comes into the building. Politics is not always about sunshine and light. It is often very cloudy and dark and gloomy. One of the things that carried the light throughout the term that I have been here for the two years is Mr. Schauerte. No matter when I see him, no matter where he is, he always has a positive outlook. He always has a smile on his face. I will miss that smile. I will miss that ray of sunshine that you bring, and I really, sincerely hope that, when you leave, a dark cloud doesn't overcome our Legislative Assembly.

---Laughter

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I, too, would like to acknowledge Mr. Schauerte's work here in the Legislative Assembly. I have been here for six years. I see the passion that he has in committee work. Sometimes we are in our committees from 7:30 in the morning through lunch hour, and Mr. Schauerte is steering us in the right direction, making sure that we follow the rules, not only in committees, but here in the House. I would just like to thank him for that. I know speed walking has not been around for many years. I am not sure if Mr. Schauerte invented it.

---Laughter

He is always on the ball, making sure that committee is prepared and all our briefings are in order. I know a lot of times they say in this House that we do not need to acknowledge the work that they do, whether it is research or the clerks, but it is very important that our residents of the Northwest Territories realize the work that is put in behind the scenes, Mr. Speaker.

A lot of the changes have happened over the years. A lot of times a budget has had major changes through the course of whether it is six weeks or two weeks, and that is because of the work of the clerks and committees. That is all of us working together, making sure that we are respectful in this House. I would just like to thank him for that, and I wish him all the best. Thank you.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. Member for Thebacha.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I certainly concur with many of the sentiments that I have heard today. I first met Doug many years ago, and he had longer and I had darker hair. His has not changed very much, but mine has. I first came to this Assembly in 2015 as part of the 2015 version of Ocean's Eleven, and we certainly needed an awful lot of guidance. Quite apart from the help that he has provided in this Assembly, he has been a great help to the Rules Committee. I was told when I was put in Rules Committee, "Well, they only meet a couple of times a year."

---Laughter

Well, it ended up being a couple of times a month. Doug has been a big help, and thank you, Doug.

---Applause

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the motion. I will allow the mover to make the final comments.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Thank you, Jackson.

---Laughter

Well, he said we're on a first name basis today.

---Laughter

I'll take that.

Protocol usually has that the chair of Caucus would move a motion such as this, and I appreciate Julie allowing me to do this, being a long-serving Member. I don't want to say the oldest; a long-serving Member. I appreciate all the comments, and I think that speaks well to the work that not only Doug does, but a lot of us in here. We're the face of our department; we're the face of committees; we're the face of the government. However, there is a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes, and I think today is a great example of that. They do all the work. We take all the credit. If things go wrong, we blame them.

---Laughter

It is a very special time, and I thank the comments that you heard from colleagues around the room here. I know you have been around for 30 years. I was talking to Doug earlier, and he is actually younger than me, but he has been around 30 years. He is going to retire. I know some of you are saying, "Take the hint, R.C. Take the hint."

---Laughter

Anyway, you have probably seen and heard a lot of things, but never repeated them. I would like to be the first one to buy your book when it is written, because I am sure you have got a lot of stories. Mr. Speaker, having said all of that, I would request a recorded vote. Thank you.

Motion 8-18(3): Expression Of Gratitude To Deputy Clerk Douglas Schauerte For Dedicated And Exemplary Service, Carried
Motions

Some Hon. Members

Hear, hear.

---Applause

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Motions

Committee Clerk (Ms. Kay)

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. Masi. The results of the vote: 16 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions. The motion is carried.

---Carried

---Applause

Masi, colleagues. Masi, Doug, for all the years of service. Your dedication is well-appreciated. Masi. Motions. Item 18, first reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 3, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018, be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. The motion is non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Bill 3 has had its first reading. First reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
First Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Thebacha, that Bill 4, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019, be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
First Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The motion is in order. The motion is non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Bill 4 has had its first reading. First reading of bills. Item 19, second reading of bills. Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Bill 1: Western Canada Lottery Act
Second Reading of Bills

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, that Bill 1, Western Canada Lottery Act, be read for the second time.

This bill establishes the Northwest Territories Lottery Commission. It also establishes the Physical Activity, Sport, and Recreation Fund, a special purpose fund that will receive proceeds from the operation of lotteries by the Western Canada Lottery Corporation. The commission is responsible for the conduct, management, and operation of lotteries. The Minister will administer the fund and distribute proceeds for limited purposes, including the promotion and delivery of physical activity, sport, and recreation programs. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 1: Western Canada Lottery Act
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Bill 1: Western Canada Lottery Act
Second Reading of Bills

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 1: Western Canada Lottery Act
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Motion carried. Bill 1 has had its second reading and is now referred to the committee. Second reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 3, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018, be read for the second time.

Mr. Speaker, this bill makes supplementary appropriation for operations expenditures for the Government of the Northwest Territories for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Bill 3 has had its second reading. Second reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
Second Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker. I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Yellowknife South, that Bill 4, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019, be read for the second time.

Mr. Speaker, this bill makes supplementary appropriations for infrastructure expenditures for the Government of the Northwest Territories for the 2018-2019 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
Second Reading of Bills

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Bill 4 has had its second reading. Second reading of bills. Item 20, consideration in Committee of the Whole of bills and other matters, Minister's Statement 1-18(3), Committee Report 2-18(3), Committee Report 3-18(3). By the authority given to me as Speaker by Motion 7-18(3), I hereby authorize the House to sit beyond the daily hour of adjournment to consider business before the House, with the Member for Hay River North in the chair.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

I will now call Committee of the Whole to order. Committee, before we begin with our committee business, I would like to continue our farewell tribute to our deputy clerk, Mr. Doug Schauerte. As we know, Doug is retiring after 31 years, and as the chair of Committee of the Whole, I would like to personally thank him for his guidance over the past two years. The first formal meeting I ever chaired was on the floor of this House, and so needless to say, I have relied heavily on him, and I greatly appreciate his support. Likewise, Doug had his hands full as the clerk for the Standing Committee on Priorities and Planning, of which eight of the 11 Members were newly elected this Assembly, and I can't imagine it was an easy experience to manage such an inexperienced group, and I apologize to the people of the territory if we have hastened Mr. Schauerte's decision to retire.

---Laughter

Over his career, Doug has proven his loyalty, discretion, and durability to each Assembly. Through it all, he has provided sage advice to Members and to other staff. Sometimes he calls this "running through the dance steps." These dances have been a constant since the time when sessions were held in a Yellowknife hotel and the occasional community gymnasium, and as our Assembly made history during the monumental dividing of the Northwest Territories to create the new territory of Nunavut.

Doug's departure signifies a truly irreplaceable loss of knowledge about the history and workings of the Legislative Assembly. It has been a pleasure and honour to work with you. Please join me in congratulating Doug on his retirement and in thanking him for his many and enduring contributions to the Legislative Assembly of the Northwest Territories.

---Applause

What is the wish of committee? Mr. Testart.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I congratulate you on your cagey use of procedure. Committee would like to consider Committee Report 2-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2015-2016 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories, and Committee Report 3-18(3), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Motion 32-18(2), Referral of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination of Time Change in the Northwest Territories to the Standing Committee on Social Development. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. Does committee agree?

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. We will begin our consideration immediately.

As I have said, we are beginning our consideration immediately. We have already taken a break earlier. First, we have agreed to consider Committee Report 2-18(3), Report on the Review of the 2015-2016 Public Accounts. I will turn to the chair of the Standing Committee on Government Operations, which wrote the report. Mr. Testart, do you have any opening comments?

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. On October 17, 2017, the Standing Committee on Government Operations presented its Report on the Review of the 2015-2016 Public Accounts, which included eight recommendations. Members of the committee may have additional comments. That concludes my opening comments, Mr. Chair. Thank you.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. As is our usual process, we will move through each of the recommendations as motions. First, I will open the floor to any general comments. Any general comments from committee? Seeing none, Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 19-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Completion Of Entities Consolidated Within The Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

October 20th, 2017

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move the assembly recommends the tabled, titled "Completion of Entities Consolidated within the Public Accounts," be included annually in the unaudited financial statement discussion and analysis section of the public accounts. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 19-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Completion Of Entities Consolidated Within The Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is being distributed. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 19-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Completion Of Entities Consolidated Within The Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 19-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Completion Of Entities Consolidated Within The Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Thank you, committee. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 20-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Comptroller General’s Office Provide Assistance To GNWT Public Agencies, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move this Assembly recommends that the Office of the Comptroller General and the Department of Finance work with all Government of the Northwest Territories public agencies to assist them to complete their audited financial statements to meet statutory reporting deadlines and to seek necessary extensions where those deadlines cannot be met. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 20-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Comptroller General’s Office Provide Assistance To GNWT Public Agencies, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 20-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Comptroller General’s Office Provide Assistance To GNWT Public Agencies, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 20-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Comptroller General’s Office Provide Assistance To GNWT Public Agencies, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 21-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Continued Debt Servicing And Infrastructure Financing Information Inclusion In The Fiscal Responsibility Policy, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that this Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories continue to include information in the financial statement discussion and analysis section of the public accounts, indicating how the Government of the Northwest Territories has met the provisions related to debt servicing and infrastructure financing in the fiscal responsibility policy. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 21-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Continued Debt Servicing And Infrastructure Financing Information Inclusion In The Fiscal Responsibility Policy, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 21-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Continued Debt Servicing And Infrastructure Financing Information Inclusion In The Fiscal Responsibility Policy, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 21-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Continued Debt Servicing And Infrastructure Financing Information Inclusion In The Fiscal Responsibility Policy, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Thank you. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Minister of Finance work with the Minister responsible for Public Engagement and Transparency to develop plain-language materials that summarize the public accounts for a given year in a manner that is understandable for an interested nonprofessional reader focusing on the key financial highlights and significant audit issues arising for that year. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. To the motion. Ms. Green.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, I am very pleased to see this recommendation. The public accounts come in a form that is not readily understandable to the interested public, and we have been, we the GNWT has been, warned that it is time for us to make the public accounts more understandable to people who are interested in learning what they are and what they represent about our government, and so I am very pleased to see that the committee has gone this additional step in creating a recommendation to address this, a solution to this long-standing problem. Thank you.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Ms. Green. Mr. Testart, to the motion.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. My colleague, the honourable Member from Yellowknife Centre, put this very well, that this is a long-standing issue that many governments face in making their financial reports and statements legible to the public. It is an example of how we can do something that seems insignificant in the grand scheme of something compared to an open-government policy or other transparency initiatives. Simply creating a readable document for the public about how we budget, how we account, it goes a long way to opening up understanding of our processes and our books. I know that, even for MLAs or candidates who are running for office, you know, having a good sense of how our money is spent and how it is collected and how that information is collected, that helps our democratic process, as well. So this really cuts across many different areas of transparency, and I think it is high time we started doing this and also producing citizen's budgets and documents like that. So it is not just the public accounts that are getting this treatment, but it is all of our fiscal process, including the operations budget and capital budget. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. To the motion.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 22-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Development Of Public Accounts Summary, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that this Assembly recommends that the Department of Finance, after consultation with the Information and Privacy Commissioner for the Northwest Territories, reconsider amending the nonconsolidated schedule of bad debt write-offs, forgiveness, and student loan remissions to protect the privacy of individuals by removing the names of those who have received student loan remissions and reporting only the amounts of those remissions. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is in order. To the motion. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks, Mr. Chair. Yes, this is an issue that I have raised in the two public accounts reviews that I have participated in. There is a big difference between bad debt as listed in here and student loan remissions, and my reading of the Financial Administration Act, and I am not a lawyer, when I read it, there is no requirement for disclosure of individual names to be listed in this part of the public accounts, and I think it is an invasion of these individuals' privacy. We want to encourage our students to come back here and work here and live here, and one way we do this is through these student loan remissions. This kind of over-the-top disclosure I think is not required, is not needed, and is an invasion of these individuals' privacy, so I am very happy to see this in here. Look, this takes up pages and pages in the public accounts. There is no need for those names to be identified. A single aggregate amount is all that is really required, and I look forward to our government implementing this particular recommendation. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. Mr. Sebert, to the motion.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Chair. This is a government that is committed to openness and transparency, and, in my view, this goes exactly the opposite way. Why do these names have to be concealed from the public? These people are receiving benefits which they deserve -- which they deserve -- I have no problem with that, but this goes completely against the idea of openness and transparency. Thank you.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Sebert. To the motion.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 23-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Amend Non-Consolidated Schedule To Protect The Privacy Of Individuals, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that this Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to this report within 120 days. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor, and the motion is in order. To the motion.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Thank you. Committee, do you agree that we have concluded consideration of Committee Report 2-18(3)?

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. This concludes our consideration of Committee Report 2-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2015-2016 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories. We have next agreed to consider Committee Report 3-18(3), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Motion 32-18(2), Referral of Petition 6-18(2), Elimination of Time Change in the Northwest Territories to the Standing Committee on Social Development. I will turn to the chair of the committee which produced the report for any opening comments. Mr. Thompson.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Chair. On October 19, 2017, the Standing Committee on Social Development presented its report on Motion 32-18(2), Referral of Petition 6-18(2), Elimination of Time Change in the Northwest Territories, to the Standing Committee on Social Development. The report involved one recommendation. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Thompson. I will open the floor to general comments. Any general comments from committee? Mr. Vanthuyne.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and thank you for the committee for undertaking this as well as to those who first presented this as a petition. The petition did get significant uptake. I do not think it is unreasonable to suggest that this is a matter that a lot of residents of the Northwest Territories were hoping would actually be moved forward and would go through.

For me, it is just a matter of time, and maybe now is not the time, but maybe some point in the future, that we are going to reach a point where we no longer have to change our clocks at all. This is antiquated, archaic legislation from back in the wartime days, and it really carries no effect today, but what does carry an effect is the negative effects that switching your clocks forward and backwards each year has.

One thing that the report did not note which, if we are ever to go down this road again, I would strongly suggest they look into, are the effects that it has on families and in particular young, young kids. That is a disruption for families when they are trying to have a newborn or very young child make this adjustment two times a year, but I recognize that this is something that the committee has done some significant work on and the research department has done some good work on, and I regret that it will not be passing, but I just thank them for that and wanted to put my comments on the record. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 24-18(3): Committee Report 2-18(3): Standing Committee On Government Operations Report On The Review Of The 2015-2016 Public Accounts Of The Government Of The Northwest Territories - Response To Report Within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Vanthuyne. Seeing nothing further, Mr. Thompson.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that this Assembly recommends, should the Government of the Northwest Territories consider change to the daylight savings time regulation in the future, that it engages with its counterparts in Alberta and undertake both broad, public, and targeted stakeholders' engagement. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Thompson. There is a motion on the floor. The motion has been distributed and is in order. To the motion. Mr. Sebert.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Louis Sebert Thebacha

I would like to thank the committee for its very bold initiative. Thank you.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Sebert. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair, and I think the last speaker with the Member opposite kind of summarized, when a lot of these kind of issues come forward, they come forward and they are written off as something that is not important to people, but they are important to people.

In the Province of Alberta, where they had a similar Private Member's bill, it generated more public engagement than any other piece of legislation in the province's history. So daylight savings, the debate around daylight savings, because it affects people's lives in a very personal way, it is disappointing to have things like this that are brought to this House via way of petition - this was not a Member's initiative; this was an initiative of the people of the Northwest Territories - to be written off as a laughing matter by any Member of this House.

Notwithstanding that, I think the committee is right to pause this work until Alberta, but my one concern is Alberta has said the same thing, that we are not going to move forward until BC does it, and BC has said we are not going to do this until California does it, you know, so they are waiting for one domino to fall and then everyone will follow suit. I say that, if we really think this is a good idea for our residents, let's be that first domino and let's just deal with it. Saskatchewan seems to do all right, and I think the Northwest Territories, if this is something our people want, that we should be bold and decide on whether or not we want to be that first domino and see everyone follow suit. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. To the motion. Mr. Nakimayak.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, I think motions like this, we need to look at what is going on to the west of us, to the east of us, and as well as other governments in this country and around the world before we start to change something like this which could affect operations within federal jurisdictions like, say, Parks Canada, for instance. They need to coincide, they need to coordinate their time of operations all across Canada, and that is the daylight savings time, time zone changes, and we need to look at the trajectory of which way these are going. I think they are staying stable, and, Mr. Chair, I think we need to focus on issues that directly affect Northerners. This is not one of them, in my view. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Nakimayak. To the motion. I will allow the mover of the motion to close debate. Mr. Thompson.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Chair. For the record, our committee took this seriously. Our research department looked into this matter quite extensively. I guess the biggest challenge that we found is that we are connected, really, with Alberta, and when Alberta is not going to change anything, that has a huge impact on us. I respect the opinions of my colleagues who voiced their concerns. They are very valid. However, at the end of the day, we have to make sure that we are consistent with our partner, which is Alberta, in how we deal with things, so when we made this recommendation, it was based on the information that we received. If Alberta does not change, then we are causing a disconnect with them, as well. Again, that is why we encouraged, that the motion is that, if it is brought up again, that they work with Alberta and stakeholders in the public to make a decision. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Thompson. To the motion.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Thank you, committee. Does committee agree this concludes our consideration of Committee Report 3-18(3)?

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. We have now concluded consideration of Committee Report 3-18(3), Standing Committee on Social Development Report on Motion 32-18(2), Referral of Petition 6-18(2), Elimination of Time Change in the Northwest Territories to the Standing Committee on Social Development. What is the wish of committee? Mr. Beaulieu.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, I move that the chair rise and report progress. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. There is a motion on the floor to report progress. The motion is in order and non-debatable. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

First, however, I want to thank the Pages who have been with us all week and who have been with us throughout this sitting. We could not do it without you, so thank you very much. I will now rise and report progress.

Committee Motion 25-18(3): Committee Report 3-18(3): Standing Committee On Social Development Report On Motion 32-18(2): Referral Of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination Of Time Change In The Northwest Territories To The Standing Committee On Social Development - Changes To Daylight Savings Time Regulations, Carried
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

May I have the report, Member Hay River North?

Report of Committee of the Whole
Report of Committee of the Whole

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Mr. Speaker, your committee has been considering Committee Report 2-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations on the Review of the 2015-2016 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories and Committee Report 3-18(3), Standing Committee on Social Developments, Report on Motion 32-18(2): Referral of Petition 6-18(2): Elimination of Time Change in the Northwest Territories To Standing Committee on Social Development.

I would like to report progress and that Committee Report 2-18(3) and Committee Report 3-18(3) are concluded with seven amendments. Mr. Speaker, I move that the Report of the Committee of the Whole be concurred with.

Report of Committee of the Whole
Report of Committee of the Whole

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Do I have a seconder? The Member for Yellowknife North. The motion is in order. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

The motion is carried. Masi. Item 22, third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018
Third Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 3, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018 be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I would request for a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Deputy Clerk Of The House (Mr. Schauerte)

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, and the Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the motion: 15 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019
Third Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Yellowknife South, that Bill 4, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019 be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I would request for a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Deputy Clerk Of The House (Mr. Schauerte)

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, and the Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the vote: 15 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Bill 4 has had its third reading. Also, for the record, Bill 3 has also had its third reading. Mr. Clerk, will you ascertain if the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, the Honourable Margaret M. Thom, is prepared to enter the Chamber and assent to bills?

Assent to Bills
Assent to Bills

Commissioner (Ms. Thom)

Please be seated.

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Legislative Assembly, good afternoon. I would like to take a moment to encourage all residents to honour the proud services and sacrifices made by current and past members of the Canadian Armed Forces. Remembrance Day is on Saturday, November 11th.

As this sitting comes to an end, I would like to wish the Members of this House good health, happiness, and prosperity as you enjoy the coming Christmas holiday season with your loved ones. I wish you all safe travels on the land, in the air, on the ice, and on our highways as you continue to work together, cooperatively, for the betterment of all Northerners.

Now, as Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, I am pleased to assent to the following Bills:

• Bill 2: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018

• Bill 3: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2017-2018

• Bill 4: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 1, 2018-2019

Thank you, Quyanainni, Merci Beaucoup, Mahsi Cho, Koana.

Assent to Bills
Assent to Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Colleagues, I would like to extend the appreciation of this House to the Commissioner, Margaret M. Thom. It was a pleasure to have you in the House today. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank all the Pages who have worked with us over the last few weeks, assisted us, and contributed to the success of our fall sitting, and to thank obviously the interpreters who have been here since day one, each and every day. We appreciate your hard work and also your dedication.

Colleagues, as we leave the Chamber today, many of us will be returning to our home, our communities, and our constituencies to spend time with our family and friends. As we all know, our profession is one that demands a lot of us in terms of our time and also energy. Please do take the time to dedicate your time and focus, your energy, on those that matter most, your family and your loved ones. Although we will not sit again until the new year, we have a great deal of work ahead of us with the upcoming business plan reviews, review of the legislation, preparation for the upcoming budget session, and ongoing work of government, committees, and also each and every one of us as Members.

Colleagues, this marks the end of an era for our Assembly, 2017. This is the last day in the Chamber for our deputy clerk, Doug Schauerte, prior to his retirement. Doug will always be welcome to join us at the table in his new role as the honorary officer of the Legislative Assembly.

Doug began his public service career at the Legislative Assembly in 1985 as a committee researcher. By 1995, he had moved up the ranks to deputy clerk, a position he has held for more than two decades. Throughout his career, Doug has served this institution, our Legislative Assembly, all Members, and committees with dedication and professionalism. He has developed a wealth of knowledge that is second to none. He has eagerly shared his knowledge with Members, with staff, and anybody who is interested in this institution or our form of consensus government. Please join me in thanking Doug for his service to the Legislative Assembly and wishing him a great and well-deserved retirement.

---Applause

Congratulations, Doug, and thank you for a job well done. Masi for everything you have done for us. Mr. Clerk, orders of the day.

Orders of the Day
Orders of the Day

Deputy Clerk Of The House (Mr. Schauerte)

Mr. Speaker, the orders of the day for Wednesday, February 7, 2018, at 1:30 p.m.:

1. Prayer

2. Ministers' Statements

3. Members' Statements

4. Returns to Oral Questions

5. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

6. Acknowledgements

7. Oral Questions

8. Written Questions

9. Returns to Written Questions

10. Replies to Commissioner's Opening Address

11. Petitions

12. Reports of Standing and Special Committees

13. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills

14. Tabling of Documents

15. Notices of Motion

16. Notices of Motion for First Reading of Bills

17. Motions

18. First Reading of Bills

19. Second Reading of Bills

20. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

• Minister's Statement 1-18(3), North Slave Correctional Complex Inmate Concerns

Report of Committee of the Whole

Third Reading of Bills

Orders of the Day

---Applause

Orders of the Day
Orders of the Day

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Well done, Mr. Clerk. This House stands adjourned until Wednesday, February 7, 2018, at 1:30 p.m.

---ADJOURNMENT

The House adjourned at 2:05 p.m.