This is page numbers 3795 – 3814 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

K'atlodeeche First Nation Access Road
Members' Statements

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Dare I say it, Mr. Speaker? It seems that spring is coming to our land. The sun is back, and we will soon see melt water at the ends of the ice crossing between the town of Hay River and the reserve. The people of the K'atlodeeche First Nation love the spring, but the closing of the ice crossing over the Hay River is very inconvenient for them. Unfortunately, people will soon be dodging the pockmarks and potholes that riddle the chip seal of the all-season access road linking the reserve to the highway and into Hay River. Last fall, the access road was at its worst. There are drainage problems in addition to the cracks and potholes. People do slow down, but the fact is that too many surface hazards compromise the safety of the road.

Mr. Speaker, residents complained to me and to the chief and council that the road was so bad that it was causing damage to their vehicles. I have raised this issue with the Minister of Infrastructure before and remember that there were plans to repair and resurface the road. There was a rare time when I was glad to see a sign "road work ahead." Now that it is almost spring, I am full of optimism that the actual road work is not far ahead. I know that the Minister must regularly drive the access road between Hay River and the reserve and probably feels a burning desire to see the job done in the upcoming construction season. I'm also optimistic that, in the time that has passed, the Minister has been able to work out many issues with the Government of Canada, but who is responsible for what in maintaining the access road?

Mr. Speaker, you can tell the spring sunshine is getting to me and perhaps all the time we've spend indoors lately. I'm dying to get out there, so I'll make the Minister of Infrastructure a rare offer. Short of putting me on a big machine or handing me a shovel, I'm here to help, Mr. Speaker. Perhaps you will spend some quality time with me fixing the road access to the Hay River reserve. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

K'atlodeeche First Nation Access Road
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Terrax Minerals Greenstone Belt Project
Members' Statements

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Yellowknife is the gateway to the Slave Geological Province. The Greenstone Belt runs north through Yellowknife with high potential for generating wealth. In fact, a number of projects are reawakening in the area, promising jobs and prosperity for generations to come.

There are just six high-grade gold districts in Canada, and ours appears to be the most promising. It is the least explored, yet has the greatest potential. The other five districts have all been long-term, multi-generational economic and social drivers for their communities and provinces. The Yellowknife Gold District dropped off the radar when Giant and Con mines closed. At that time, gold was closer to $225 an ounce. Now it's almost $1,700 per ounce.

Mr. Speaker, TerraX has been steadily promoting the Yellowknife City Gold Project. This company has been open, proactive, and transparent. It has engaged with numerous stakeholder groups and continues to do so before each year's exploration program.

Six years ago, TerraX started with 26 square kilometres. It has now expanded to 770 square kilometres in an area that includes three past producing mines. It has taken over 10,000 samples, held over 12,000 engagements, drilled over 50 kilometres of core sample, and is always seeking to exploit new technologies. The Yellowknife City Gold Project has grown into a world-class district and, as we know, it opens the corridor north into the Slave Geological Province.

In last Wednesday's paper, TerraX listed many of the community's recreational, educational, tourism, and scientific events that the company supports. Many of these events share the legacy of exploration trails in the area. Rather than restrict access, TerraX actively promotes the safe coordinated co-usage of our surrounding trails and ice roads.

Mr. Speaker, proponents of the project believe that responsible, environmentally sustainable development can generate a century of social and economic prosperity for the Yellowknife Gold District. It's an opportunity for long-term, multi-generational training, employment, and wealth that can support clean jobs, independent families, and healthy communities well into the future.

Mr. Speaker, the Greenstone Belt to the Slave Geological Province holds the potential for wealth that can offer us that future. Mr. Speaker, it's up to us to seize the opportunity and make that future possible. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Terrax Minerals Greenstone Belt Project
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Commonwealth Day
Members' Statements

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Visitors to the Legislative Assembly today may have noticed the Union Jack flying over our building, and that is because today is Commonwealth Day, the annual celebration of the Commonwealth of Nations, which throughout the world is being celebrated by the organization 53 member states.

More than 2.4 billion people live in those 53 nations that make up the Commonwealth, accounting for 30 per cent of the world's population and representing every continent on earth. The theme of this year's celebration is "Towards a Common Future." This day not only symbolizes the continued connection to our heritage, but demonstrates how institutions that stem from that heritage, like the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, will remain vital for the continued success and prosperity of all sibling nations of the Commonwealth.

Earlier today, Her Majesty the Queen attended a multi-faith service at Westminster Abbey and gave her annual address, this year centering on solving important global challenges like ensuring environmental sustainability and promoting fairness and equality. As we enter the 66th year of her rein, the Queen, more now than ever, acts as a living embodiment of stability and continuity, which are the foundational principles of the Commonwealth. Her Majesty's grace and leadership continues to inspire all member nations and the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, of which this Assembly is a member.

The Commonwealth Parliamentary Association is an organization which works to support good governance, democracy, and human rights. It strives to create the conditions throughout its member states and all nations of the world where we can work together to secure a more sustainable, prosperous, fair, and safer Commonwealth for all. I have had the pleasure of being involved with this organization for a few years now and can attest to the work and benefits that come from having this form for leaders across the 53 nations to meet and accomplish goals that will lead us towards a common future.

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to stand as a member of this House and as part of a Parliamentary tradition that stretches back hundreds of years. Commonwealth Day is an important opportunity to celebrate this heritage as a beacon for stability in an ever more unstable world. Let's take this time on Commonwealth Day to celebrate the continued peace, order, and good governance Commonwealth nations have fostered together. Let us also recognize the good works brought forth by continued cooperation within our Commonwealth like the CPA, and finally let us take a moment to recognize her Majesty the Queen.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Happy Commonwealth Day, and God Save the Queen.

Commonwealth Day
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Role Of The Status Of Women Council
Members' Statements

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Last Thursday, I asked some questions of the Minister responsible for the Status of Women about the NWT Status of Women Council. She indicated that the board, under her direction, is moving the council in a new direction that is contrary to its mandate. Following that discussion, I read the Status of Women Council Act. The legislation says the council has an outward-looking focus with the following purposes: to develop public awareness of issues affecting the status of women, to promote a change in attitude so women have equality of opportunity, to encourage discussion on the status of women, to advise the Minister on issues she refers to the Council, to review government policies and legislation, to provide assistance to the Minister in promoting change, and, finally, to assist organizations that promote women's equality.

Mr. Speaker, the Status of Women Council has a current strategic plan. Its goals mirror those in the legislation and provide for a continuation of its current work, such as offering campaign schools, chairing the Coalition Against Family Violence, and organizing Family Awareness Week and the December 6th Vigil. It also provides for them to continue in a public role advocating for women's equality. Even though this plan was developed in the time the Minister has been Minister, there is no mention of undertaking gender-based analysis, although the act provides her with the authority to request this work.

Mr. Speaker, we know that the Wise Women Awards have been suspended, we're told, for the time being. The campaign schools are now being offered by the Department of the Executive and Indigenous Affairs. Until today, the Coalition against Family Violence featured prominently on the EIA website.

Looking at this range of changes, I'm concerned that the Minister is moving the council from its core, publicly focused mandate and advocacy, and that activities which should remain as arm's length activism are being undertaken under government control.

Mr. Speaker, change is inevitable and change may be good, but change behind closed doors and without public consultation that fundamentally alters the council's presence is unacceptable in a government that provides itself on openness and transparency. I will have questions for the Minister. Mahsi.

Role Of The Status Of Women Council
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statement. Member for Nunakput.

Arctic Council Environmental Assessment Workshops
Members' Statements

March 12th, 2018

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I would like to highlight an exciting event that is taking place here in Yellowknife on April 24th to 26th. Mr. Speaker, the Arctic Council will hold its Sustainable Development Working Group in town conducting workshops on Environmental Impact Assessment and public participation in the Arctic. Mr. Speaker, this will be the third environmental impact assessment workshop following the first in Alaska themed "Meaningful Engagement of Indigenous People within the Environmental Impact Assessment" and the second one in Finland themed "Nordic Possibilities and Perspectives to Environmental Impact Assessments in the Arctic."

The Arctic Council's Sustainable Working Group aims to propose and adopt steps to be taken by the Arctic states to advance sustainable development in the Arctic. The EIA project of this working group aims at taking into consideration local and traditional knowledge to identify solutions that are specific to Arctic nations and the vulnerable Arctic environment. The theme for the Yellowknife workshop will be "Good Practices in Arctic Environmental Assessment Impact."

Mr. Speaker, this is a great opportunity to get to know some of the important work the Arctic Council does, especially given the relevance of the workshop to our resource-rich territory. This is also an opportunity for us to show our expertise, not only on environmental assessments, but also in environmental stewardship, Indigenous collaboration, and Indigenous and local knowledge.

Mr. Speaker, we expect that all the NWT environmental review boards will attend, as well as Nunavut, as well as some local and Indigenous leaders. The workshop, again, will take place on April 24th to 26th here in Yellowknife. For more information and to get on the invitation list, contact Matt Bender with Crown Indigenous Relations and Northern Affairs. Mr. Speaker, I look forward to seeing our world-class northern Environmental Impact Review Boards highlighted at this important event. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Arctic Council Environmental Assessment Workshops
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Eulogy For Arthur "archie" Beaulieu
Members' Statements

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I speak today about the passing of a well-known, respected artist named Arthur Beaulieu, who was known to everyone as "Archie."

"Archie was a humble man. He didn't care too much for luxury. He just lived a simple life. He was always smiling, laughing, and joking with those around him. He was an inspiration to a lot of youth. Archie was one to break the ground. His career, his fame, and financial success were an inspiration to future generations of Behchoko. Everything he did was for his family." Those kind words were expressed by Archie's first cousin Maurice Zoe.

Mr. Speaker, Archie was born August 16, 1952, in Behchoko and sadly passed away on November 10, 2017, at age 65. Archie was a son of Joseph Susie Beaulieu and Sarah Zoe. Archie is predeceased by four siblings, George, Marie Rose, Therese, and Patrick. Archie is survived by: his wife, Rosa Wedawin Beaulieu; his seven children, Jeffrey, Christine, Brenda, Beamer, Lester, Star, and Corey; his four siblings, Berna, Mabel, Frances, and Alfred. He also had 15 grandchildren.

Mr. Speaker, Archie was my cousin. Over the years, I had visited with him many times. I went to see him in his home to look at his art gallery. He had also come to my home many times. He was always pleased to see other Tlicho artists doing so well. I would like to extend my condolences to Archie's family, friends, and the community of Behchoko. They have truly lost a wonderful person. Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker.

Eulogy For Arthur "archie" Beaulieu
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. My condolences go out to the family as well. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Colleagues, I would like to draw your attention to some visitors in the gallery. We have with us a group of students in the chamber here today. Ecole Entre-Lacs from Penticton, visiting Yellowknife for the first time. We have the principal and two teachers. Also with them is Ross Fortin. He is a former RCMP member for Yellowknife. I would just like to say, "Welcome back and thanks for being here with us." Masi. [English translation not provided]. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I’d like to recognize some of the partners in the NWT On the Land Collaborative as visitors in the gallery today: Sarah Dennis, Regional Environmental Coordinator with ENR; Jess Dunkin, director of On the Land Programs with the NWT Recreations and Parks Association; John B. Zoe, the community advisor for the Tlicho Region; Winter Haley, Communities and Communications Advisor with Diavik Diamond Mines Inc.; Steven Nitah and Barrett Sonny Lenoir with the Indigenous Leadership Initiative; Angela Young, coordinator, and Jackie Siegel, project coordinator, with the Indigenous Languages and Education Secretariat at ECE; Kyla Kakfwi Scott, senior advisor, Anti-Poverty with Health and Social Services. Welcome. Thank you.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.