This is page numbers 5827 - 5874 of the Hansard for the 19th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was know.

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Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I stand before you to remind this government the dark chapter in Canadian history of the devastating issue of child abuse and genocide that took place in Canada's day school system. This systematic culture devastation committed against Indigenous people in our country for far too long. It is time for us to acknowledge the damages done and make amends to the atrocities committed.

Our government is not innocent in this matter. The federal Indian day school and the Indian federal day school were transferred to the GNWT on April 1st, 1969, and the territorial government continued these programs until April 1st, 1996, for 27 years under the GNWT system, and the abuse continued throughout the NWT, including in the Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh riding of N'dilo, Dettah, Lutselk'e, and Fort Resolution.

The discovery of the remains of hundreds of Indigenous children at a residential school across Canada is a stark reminder of the horrors that these children and their families suffered. The scars of this traumatic experience still run deep. It is time for us to take action to help those affected to heal and move forward. The Government of the Northwest Territories must step up and advocate for the victims of the day school system. It is their responsibility to ensure that the Indigenous children and their families receive compensation from the federal government in resources for the abuse and harm they have endured after April 1st, 1969 to 1996.

We must stand together as a nation and work together in healing and reconciliation for all Indigenous people. We need to ensure that all Indigenous people receive the care and support and resources needed to heal and recover from this. We cannot allow survivors and their families to suffer in silence and must do everything in our power to support them. The Government of the Northwest Territories must take the lead in advocating for the victims of the day school system after April 1st, 1969 to April 1st, 1996 and ensure that they receive the compensation they deserve similar to the federal day school compensation prior to 1969. Together we can work together at a brighter future for all Indigenous people in Canada. Let's stand together and make a difference for the survivors and their families. I would have questions for the Premier, Caroline Cochrane, at the appropriate time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Members' statements. Member for Great Slave.

Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, my riding is unique in Yellowknife in that it consists mainly of residential homes and apartment buildings with a few exceptions. There is the Catholic Church and the City of Yellowknife's water treatment plant as well as the NWT Geological Survey, Taiga lab, and Con Mine. And Mr. Speaker, there is one school, Sir John Franklin High School.

Sir John was first constructed in the 1960s with additional phases added and renovations carried out over the years. The building is also home to the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, or NACC, one of the few theatrical arts spaces in our capital.

While operated by the Yellowknife School Board YK1, Sir John is unique as the board does not own the asset. Rather, Mr. Speaker, YK1 maintains and operates the school under agreements with the GNWT. This is likely due to the school being on the site of the former Akaitcho Hall residential school, further complicating issues.

When insurance costs escalated during the pandemic, an MOU was signed between the school boards and ECE for the GNWT to insure the schools, easing some of their financial burden. In return, the boards agreed to maintain the schools to GNWT standards. However, these standards are more stringent than their previous level of maintenance and it is costing them money. Since 2019 there has been a 30 to 40 percent increase in material costs to maintain the operations of YK1's buildings. Sir John has a chronic leaking pipe that became an emergency around Christmas and YK1 was left scrambling to find funds to pay for the patch job.

Mr. Speaker, $1 million in maintenance is required for this leaking pipe alone. Who is going to pay for that? Will YK1 have to take it out of their programming budget to fix this issue in a building they don't even own? Additionally, $100,000 in upgrades is required for Sir John's internal phone system, a safety issue when inoperable. But there aren't any funds to pay for this either. In total, YK1 needs $1.4 million for the maintenance of their schools. The ECE Minister said he would investigate this pre-COVID but nothing has been done.

Mr. Speaker, we need to support our schools and ensure that all children in the NWT have safe spaces in which to learn and play. It is their right, and I hope that the department will help out our school boards with their ongoing maintenance woes. If left on their own, programs will be cut, and children will suffer. And Mr. Speaker, NWT children deserve better than that. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Caitlin Cleveland

Caitlin Cleveland Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, Canadians en masse are working to access health care. They are waiting for elective surgeries, access to specialists, testing and treatment requirements of cancers, chronic disease, and STIs, and a surge in addiction and mental health support needs. In addition, special treatment programs like audiology, speech pathology, physiotherapy, and occupational therapy appointments put off over the pandemic further bottleneck our already fragile system. The catchup, Mr. Speaker, will take years, and some national experts speculate that the Canadian health care system may never catch up under its status quo approach. Today, to help alleviate the pressures of our health care system, many Canadian jurisdictions expanded the scope of practice to pharmacists. And I say many, Mr. Speaker, not all, because it is all except the NWT and Nunavut.

This term brought minor amendments to the Pharmacy Act and a promise of more ambitious legislation, but with five sitting days left in this month I am doubtful that I will see this promise realized.

Mr. Speaker, I want to talk about three examples of what this really means. Pharmacists can't prescribe medications for simple things like smoking cessation, minor ailments or conditions like chronic UTIs, or adapt a prescription to suit the needs and reactions of a patient. From flu shots to routine immunizations and travel vaccines, pharmacies can't offer convenient access to injections. NWT pharmacists have no injection authority. Beyond flu vaccines and COVID vaccines, a pharmacist can't even administer the medications they have handed to a patient. This means taking their medication, booking an appointment with primary care, and then having their medication injected by a nurse or physician, further straining our system. Patients can't work with pharmacists to sort out medication amounts or source alternatives.

An example of this is a Parkinson's patient who worked for two years to stabilize their medication. The current system forced a harmful back and forth between a taxed locum reliant system with zero continuity of care rather than empowering managing prescriptions with the pharmacist.

Mr. Speaker, this also causes a barrier to Indigenous residents covered by NHIB for things that should be easily accessible, like birth control, Tylenol, and diabetes devices like glucose test strips. With the current Act, residents need to request a prescription from a doctor and then go see a pharmacist to source these items. Canada's pharmacists are doing more for their patients than ever before, but they continue to be an underutilized health care resource in the Northwest Territories. When they can't practice to their full scope, Mr. Speaker, it means that patients aren't receiving the best possible care and the system can't work to its full potential. Thank you.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Kam Lake. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Rylund Johnson

Rylund Johnson Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. This weekend is my least favourite day of the year, Mr. Speaker. And that's the day the clocks go forward. And, Mr. Speaker, it's not just me who hates the time change. Every single year the day after the time change there's a spike in car accidents, Mr. Speaker. People hate the time change so much they are crashing their cars in protest.

Mr. Speaker, the day after time change, the economy loses millions of dollars in economic productivity, and the Monday following time change is the Number 1 sick day consistently in the GNWT, Mr. Speaker. People awake and, in protest of the time change, they phone in sick to their public service job which they love, Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, we recently went out and we surveyed whether to get rid of the time change, and it was the single biggest response the GNWT has ever gotten in a survey. 3,545 people responded. Mr. Speaker, that broke the previous record on the cannabis survey. The people have spoken. They hate the time change more than they love cannabis, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, 87 percent of respondents said they were in favour of getting rid of the time change. 87 percent, Mr. Speaker. What clearer direction do we need from our people?

Mr. Speaker, all too frequently we go out and we produce these "what we heard" reports, and they become "what we did not listen to" reports. Mr. Speaker, the Minister of time is not here today so I will have questions for the Premier whether she will listen to the people of the Northwest Territories, and this can be the last time change once and for all, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife North. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Shane Thompson

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you Mr. Speaker.

Mr. Speaker, today I'd like to share with you a success story from the Nahendeh riding. 18 years ago, the business arm of the Acho Dene Koe First Nation, Fort Simpson Metis Nation, Nahanni Butte Dene Band, and Sambaa K'e First Nation came together to form Dehcho Regional Helicopters. The core of a business plan was to secure, with their operating partner Great Slave Helicopters, the contract for the helicopter services that supported the Fort Simpson fire base. It is a source of pride for the Dehcho Regional Helicopters Limited partners that every summer, since its founding, the company has played a part in managing wildfires and protecting the communities and cabins of their members from these fires.

In 2008, the company acquired its first helicopter, an ASTAR 350 B2, which its call sign was DCV. That helicopter has been dedicated to forestry contracts based out of Fort Simpson each summer.

In 2010, the partnership extended to include the economic arms of the Liidlii Kue First Nation and Pehdzeh Ki First Nation. The expansion united all seven First Nation and Metis Nations in the Nahendeh region in the business. Their business model and their commitment to each of the seven limited partners have contributed to this company's success.

This past spring, Dehcho Regional Helicopters acquired a second helicopter, an ASTAR 350 B3, named after the company with the call sign DRH, a helicopter which you might have noticed flying around the city because it's bright orange, has already worked at Diavik during drill moves outside of Yellowknife this past summer supporting fire crews in the mining sector in Saskatchewan.

As the only 100 percent Indigenous-owned helicopter company in the territory, Dehcho Regional Helicopters and its limited partners are committed to increasing Indigenous participation in leadership in the aviation industry. The company offered three different types of scholarships each year. In 2020, and again in 2021, the company was pleased to award $30,000 to fixed-wing or helicopter pilot scholarships to two students from Fort Simpson who were studying aviation management program at Sub-Arctic Leadership Training College in Fort Smith.

Dehcho Regional Helicopters, which is looking forward to celebrating its 20th anniversary in 2024, as an Indigenous business success story. Please join me in congratulating them. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nahendeh. Members' statements. Returns to oral questions. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

March 9th, 2023

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Diane Archie

Diane Archie Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to wish Lillian Elias Happy Birthday today. She's our language interpreter. It's her 80th birthday. Quyananni for all your hard work that you do here. I'd also like to recognize MP McLeod and Grand Chief Lafferty who's joining me this afternoon to do a big announcement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Inuvik Boot Lake. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Julie Green

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to thank Brad Enge for coming to the Legislative Assembly today to observe our proceedings. And I'd like to say hello to a longtime friend Kelly Ryder who is here as well. Thank you.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Yellowknife Centre. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nunakput.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Jackie Jacobson

Jackie Jacobson Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today I'd like to welcome Lieutenant Colonel Kris Udesen, commanding officer of First Canadian Ranger Patrol Group out of here, out of Yellowknife. I want to welcome him to the House and thank him for his service. And I want to welcome former colleagues of ours here in the House, Mr. Speaker. I really miss them. Jackson Lafferty, grand chief, thank you for coming to the House. It's always good to see you. And our former colleague Mike McLeod MP and thank him for all what you guys are doing for the people. And keep up the good work.

And also, Mr. Speaker, I'd like to welcome Sholto Douglas in the House as well, from Fort Smith. Sholto is one of the most knowledgeable dog guys I know and the biggest volunteer for NWT dog sledding where he travels around and helps us in the Delta for timing and being race marshals and stuff like that, for the community, for the communities across the North, you know.

Mr. Speaker, also I really want to welcome to the House one of my closest friends for over 20 years, Mr. Curtis Earhart from Alaska. Curtis came, one of our friends got in a car accident, Mr. Speaker, Brent Beck, and he had nobody to care for his dogs. And Curtis drove 28 hours from Fairbanks, Alaska, on his own dime, to come and help Brent run, train, and for keeping upkeep of his dogs. And Curtis went above and beyond, you know, for that, doing not only training now, then they got on the race circuit. So he went to Minnetonka, Minnesota, and they've been travelling around and doing the southern South Slave dog races. And I just really want to, you know, thank Curtis for what he's done for Brent. And he'd do that for anybody; I know that. And I just want to thank him for what he's done and just let it be known that, you know, it's not going unseen and we thank him. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Nunakput. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Richard Edjericon

Richard Edjericon Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize Michael McLeod, our MP from the Northwest Territories. I'd like to say welcome. Also I'd like to welcome Jackson Lafferty, the grand chief of the Tlicho region. Mahsi for being here. Also I want to recognize Brad Enge; I think he's in the back. And also, I'd like to recognize Sholto Douglas, and thank you for being here. And also, I want to say thank you to, again, all the translators out of here as well, including Mary Rose Sundberg, Jonas Lafferty, Tommy Unka, Marg Casaway, and our friends who have a Happy Birthday to them. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Deh Cho.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Ronald Bonnetrouge

Ronald Bonnetrouge Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize the Member of Parliament, Mr. Michael McLeod, and welcome him to the House. But this House is my House so he's actually a constituent, Mr. Speaker. And I'd also like to welcome back former colleague, Mr. Jackson Lafferty, who is now the grand chief of the Tlicho Nation. I'd like to congratulate him on that venture and hope him success in many fronts. And I'd also like to recognize Sholto Douglas who is the vice-president of the NWT Sled Dog Sports. I wasn't sure he was a vice-president because he always says he's the boss, so I don't know about that then. I'd also like to recognize Curtis Earhart. My colleague recognized him and advised where he was from and that he is racing with Brent Beck Racing Team. And this weekend too, Fort Smith is hosting a sled dog racing weekend to their carnival. They have one of the largest pools around. And we got ten-dog racing teams and an equal number, if not more, for the six-dog racing, so I wish them well, good luck this weekend in Fort Smith. Mahsi.

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Deh Cho. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Katrina Nokleby

Katrina Nokleby Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. While I'm happy to see all our illustrious people in the gallery, I want to recognize my page Chelsea Sieban who has been here for a couple weeks now, and I just say that after our time in COVID, when we didn't have the pages, it's really great to have them. And this group particularly seems to be really on top of the water glass filling. So thank you very much for that. And Happy Birthday to Lillian. Take care.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Great Slave. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Hay River South.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Rocky Simpson

Rocky Simpson Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Seems like we're at a navy meeting here or something. I'd like to recognize Brad Enge; Michael McLeod, our MP; Mr. Sholto Douglas; and Mr. Jackson Lafferty, grand chief. Welcome. Welcome back home. Thank you.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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The Speaker

The Speaker Frederick Blake Jr.

Thank you, Member for Hay River South. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Thebacha.

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Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

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Frieda Martselos

Frieda Martselos Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I too would like to recognize our MP for coming to visit us in this House, and welcome back to Fort Smith any time he wants, because that's where he went to school in the early years. I used to serve him on the line. I also want to welcome Jackson. I congratulate him on his grand chief appointment by all his people. That's a big achievement. And I want to recognize Brad who used to -- is a former Fort Smith resident. And of course Sholto, for all his volunteer work, not only with the dog mushers but Sholto is a great caterer and does incredible meals for the community at many community events. And I want to thank him for that. Thank you, Sholto.