This is page numbers 2575 – 2598 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 2nd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was going.

Topics

Members Present

Hon. Glen Abernethy, Mr. Blake, Hon. Caroline Cochrane, Ms. Green, Hon. Jackson Lafferty, Hon. Bob McLeod, Hon. Robert McLeod, Mr. McNeely, Hon. Alfred Moses, Mr. Nadli, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. O'Reilly, Hon. Wally Schumann, Hon. Louis Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Vanthuyne

The House met at 10:01 a.m.

---Prayer

Prayer
Prayer

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Good morning, Members. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Minister's Statement 191-18(2): Disability Awareness Week And Disabilities Review
Ministers' Statements

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, Mr. Speaker, Disability Awareness Week is approaching in the NWT. Each year we acknowledge persons with disabilities and strive to raise awareness of challenges they may face in their daily lives with accessibility and inclusion. We also recognize volunteers who work to help persons with disabilities achieve equality within their communities during the annual disabilities awareness tea. There are more than 3,000 people in the NWT who identify as having a disability. The GNWT has committed in its mandate to ensuring effective supports and programs are in place for persons with disabilities. Completing the NWT Disability Program Review and Renewal Project Public Engagement Questionnaire is part of fulfilling that commitment.

The project is being led by the Department of Health and Social Services in collaboration with non-government organizations from the disabilities sector and a working group comprised of officials from the Departments of Education, Culture and Employment; Municipal and Community Affairs; Justice; Finance; and the NWT Housing Corporation. The disability review will document existing resources and identify gaps in disability programs and services as well as opportunities for improvement. This review will ensure government departments are maximizing the use of existing resources, are marketing them effectively, and are establishing priority areas for new initiatives, should additional resources become available.

Through the disability review, we will also develop a strategic framework and a five-year action plan that addresses the needs of persons with disabilities. The action plan will be focused on four pillars, ensuring services are person-centered and family-driven; improving inclusion and accessibility of services; increasing awareness and education; and coordination, evaluation and reporting. As a first deliverable, we will publish an updated inventory of existing GNWT programs and services in the near future. Mr. Speaker, I am confident that this review and the development of the strategic framework and action plan will enhance and improve the programs and services we have for persons with disabilities, and ultimately enhance their quality of life here in the NWT. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 191-18(2): Disability Awareness Week And Disabilities Review
Ministers' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Minister's Statement 192-18(2): Changes To The Income Assistance Program
Ministers' Statements

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, over the past year, the Department of Education, Culture and Employment has been making significant changes to the way it provides critical support for the territory's most vulnerable residents through its Income Assistance Program.

In 2016, the federal government announced the Canada Child Benefit. This new benefit had significant implications for our Income Assistance Program, and we revised our program so that the new Canada Child Benefit was not counted as income under the Income Assistance program. This change was intended to ensure all NWT residents with families received the full benefit of this new federal program. Mr. Speaker, through a joint initiative with our colleagues at the Department of Finance we will be increasing the Northwest Territories Child Benefit to provide additional financial support to more low- to modest-income families with children and not only those accessing income assistance. For example, a family with three children under six whose annual income is $45,000 would have received $136.05 per year before the changes. With the enhanced benefit, that same family will now receive $1,397.90, an increase of $1,261.85.

The enhanced NWT Child Benefit will also now reach more Northwest Territories families, as we have increased the income threshold to receive this benefit to $80,000. We estimate that more than 2,200 families will benefit from these changes. The enhanced Northwest Territories Child Benefit will continue to be non-taxable, and will not be counted as income in the calculation of income assistance benefits. The improved NWT Child Benefit will take effect in July.

Mr. Speaker, I am pleased that the amendments to the Income Tax Act made earlier in this sitting will allow us to move forward with our plan to help families provide a better quality of life for their children, support their well-being, and give children opportunities to reach their potential. The Government of the Northwest Territories continues to review and update its Income Security Programs so they respond to the needs and realities of our residents, including the rising cost of living in our territory. This is a critical step toward the health and well-being of families across the North. These changes, and all of the revisions we have undertaken, support the 18th Legislative Assembly's mandate to reduce the cost of living, foster healthy families, improve the affordability of childcare, and reduce poverty by increasing the benefits to low- and modest-income families. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 192-18(2): Changes To The Income Assistance Program
Ministers' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Infrastructure.

Minister's Statement 193-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Ministers' Statements

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, the Government of the Northwest Territories has passed legislation to establish a revolving fund for the Yellowknife Airport. This initiative will allow for significant improvements to the airport that will enhance services for users and make the airport a bigger economic driver for the entire North.

The new revolving fund will come into effect on July 1st along with a new airport improvement fee and increases to aeronautical charges. Mr. Speaker, the increased revenue generated by the airport will allow us to make critical changes to the airport facilities to increase business opportunities and improve the quality of service for travellers.

The Department of Infrastructure continues to communicate with air carriers, businesses, residents, and other stakeholders about these changes and is committed to ensuring they are able to provide input into how these funds are used. The Yellowknife Airport will benefit from the advice of several committees and Members of this Legislative Assembly. Airport committees include the Airline Consultative Committee and the Airline Operating Committee, which provide the opportunity for the airline community to meet formally with airport management to discuss issues of concern and to develop potential solutions.

The Economic Advisory Committee will provide a forum for communications with businesses, utilize the expertise of business leaders, and build community awareness for airport-related opportunities to enhance business and economic development for the NWT. Committee members will help shape the development of the Yellowknife Airport, attract outside investment, and enable it to act as a catalyst for the wider NWT economy. The Department of Infrastructure will continue to provide updates to the Standing Committee on Economic Development and Environment and to seek the committee's input. The revolving fund budget will be presented as an information item in the business plan and main estimates of the Department of Infrastructure. Members will also be able to review the airport's progress in the audited financial statements of the revolving fund that will be published with the GNWT's public accounts. Key airport stakeholders also provided input in the development of a draft business plan for the Yellowknife Airport identifying improvements necessary for a strong and effective airport going forward. The Department of Infrastructure is revising this business plan using public feedback. The revised version will be made public and implementation of the plan will begin in July. All of the actions identified in the business plan will be accompanied by clear timelines for implementation.

Mr. Speaker, the Department of Infrastructure plans to renew the Yellowknife Airport business plan on an annual basis. In developing the annual plans, the input of all of the advisory committees and Members of the Legislative Assembly will be critical, and the draft business plan will be shared with the Economic Advisory Committee and the airline consultative committee for their review and input. Each committee will provide advice based on their mandates and expertise, which will include commentary on the airport's developing capital plan. Annual reports will provide information to the public about how well the airport is achieving its mission. As the Department of Infrastructure refines the current business plan, we are not wasting any time beginning improvements to the Yellowknife Airport.

Mr. Speaker, one of the key things we heard from the public about improvements to the airport is more efficient services. Design and implementation plans are currently being finalized for common use terminal equipment, which allows airlines to interchange terminals and ultimately shorten check-in wait times. The planned addition of self-service check-in kiosks further reduces wait times. The Department of Infrastructure has begun developing a tender to complete design and geotechnical work for an improved de-icing bay at the airport. This improves the efficiency of airline operations while helping ensure on-time departures for passengers.

Pre-design of a new security screening facility is underway to reduce passenger screening time while continuing to maintain a high level of safety and security for passengers and staff. Some of you have probably seen that Javaroma is now serving food and beverages in the departure lounge. This is just the beginning of our plans for additional services, food, and beverages in the security area. A number of improved services will also support businesses. New phone charging stations will be established throughout the airport, and wi-fi upgrades are also planned. We are creating a Gate 5 Business Centre, which will give mine staff unlimited Internet access and increase their productivity during wait times. Industry-specific security screening will take place at the airport prior to departure, rather than at the mines upon arrival. This change will save person-hours and allow staff to work more efficiently.

We also heard that better use of space at the airport will reduce congestion. The Department of Infrastructure has plans to relocate the oversize baggage facility in the check-in area of the airport to create more passenger queue space. We are also working with Edmonton International Airport to develop an economic growth plan that would support parking facility upgrades, a terminal improvement plan, and a real estate growth plan. The Department of Infrastructure continues to work with air carriers on new routes. Expanding flight options would provide new travel opportunities for residents while helping support increased tourism within the territory. The establishment of a revolving fund is enabling the transformation of the Yellowknife Airport into a centre of capital growth, economic investment, and quality service for travellers both outside and within the NWT. The Department of Infrastructure will continue to update airport stakeholders and the general public on the changes we expect to take off in the coming year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 193-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Ministers' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Colleagues, I'd like to draw your attention to the people in the gallery today. I'm pleased to recognize the Indigenous leaders from Colombia who are visiting the NWT this week. We have with us Mr. Higinio Obispo, Ms. Martha Peralta, Mr. Antonio Lopez, Mr. Diego Botero, and Ms. Lina Lorenzoni. They are also accompanied by Mr. Steven Cooper, Mr. Kevin Kossowan, Ms. Mary Grzybowska, Ms. Karie Bell, and also it's also interesting to have another interpreter in our house. It's always great to have another language in the House. Their interpreter in the booth is Mr. Tjebbe Donner. Thanks for being here with us. Welcome to our Assembly. Welcome to Canada. Masi for being here with us.

---Applause

Item 3, Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Visiting Colombian Delegation Of The International Bar Association's Indigenous Peoples Committee
Members' Statements

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It's a segue to my Member's statement. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to welcome to the House members and guests of the International Bar Association's Indigenous Peoples Committee. With a membership of over 40,000, the International Bar Association is the global voice of the legal profession.

Committee Chair Steven Cooper and Vice Chair Lina Lorenzoni organized an "Indigenous to Indigenous business knowledge exchange program" which has leaders from the Northwest Territories engaging with counterparts in Colombia. Mr. Cooper, as many Members may know, is a partner in Ahlstrom Wright Oliver & Cooper and is a former long-term resident of Hay River and a legal advocate for First Nations, Inuit, and Metis across the North. In July 2015, First Nations representatives from the Northwest Territories attend three communities in Colombia to interact with leaders there. The purpose of the exchange was to discuss the evolution of the relationship between northern Canadian First Nations and extraction companies. The Indigenous people in Colombia are suffering through many of the growing pains that were experienced in the Northwest Territories in the 1970s and 1980s and are looking to their Indigenous colleagues here for guidance.

The Northwest Territories is being held up as the paradigm for change in Colombian Indigenous circles. The success of First Nations, Metis, and Inuit in regaining control and establishing autonomy in the Northwest Territories is an inspiration and a framework for change in Colombia. The visit this week to the Northwest Territories is phase 2 of the project sponsored by the IBA. They are getting to visit some companies and municipal governments to see how we do business. I would like to thank the organizers for coming here during this sitting to see how our government system works. I am proud to say this could be their future model for them. I would like to thank the Premier and his office and his staff for allowing them here today and to show them around the Assembly. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Visiting Colombian Delegation Of The International Bar Association's Indigenous Peoples Committee
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Skills Canada NWT
Members' Statements

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, one of the strengths of the 18th Assembly is our broad range of experiences -- what we might call our past lives. In this Chamber, we have journalists, non-profit coordinators, lawyers, public servants, community leaders, small-business owners, and more. This diversity also reflects our constituents. In my own past life, before I was a small-business owner, I was an apprentice carpenter and cabinet maker, so I understand the importance of the skilled trades.

A few days ago, the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment tabled the NWT Apprenticeship, Trades and Occupational Certification Strategy. Mr. Speaker, we're going to need that strategy, and we're going to have to put it into action soon. To meet our forecast growth, the NWT is going to need more than 2,300 skilled trades jobs by the year 2030: carpenters, electricians, automotive service technicians, heavy-duty equipment mechanics, plumbers, and welders. We are lucky that we have a non-profit organization on the case. Skills Canada NWT is a registered charity that for almost 20 years has engaged youth in the skilled trades in our communities.

It organizes skills clubs, youth conferences, regional and territorial competitions, and supports our best at national competitions. I am proud to say I have served on its board, and I have seen firsthand how Skills Canada makes a difference for our young people who want to learn and to work. Mr. Speaker, in past generations, success was measured by whether you went to university or not, but we live in a different world. Today, technical and trade schools dedicated to excellence and innovation are popular and growing fast. Skills Canada's message to northern youth is that the skilled trades are for anyone, and the government's new strategy encourages women and Aboriginal youth to enter into apprenticeships. In the NWT and across Canada, resources remain at the core of our economy. Technical expertise, innovation, and skilled trades will be a centre of growth in our future.

Mr. Speaker, this week, northern youth are competing at the Skills Canada National Competition in Winnipeg. I want to wish them all the best and thank them for representing our territory with their wisdom, strength and, of course, their skills. Mr. Speaker, trades work. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Skills Canada NWT
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Recognition Of Retiring Public Servants Debbie Greenland And Sheila Greenland
Members' Statements

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, let me acknowledge a couple of people who have served the NWT for several years in their respective departments.

Ms. Debbie Greenland, manager for her department for three communities of Fort McPherson, Aklavik, and Tuktoyaktuk. Debbie Greenland was employed with the Health and Social Services Authority since 1980 until 2017, 37 years of service, dedicated to her field of helping families and assisting with our schools, working as a community liaison to ensure families are safe and living in a healthy family environment. Let me congratulate and thank Debbie for all the years of service, and wish her well in her future endeavours.

Mr. Speaker, please allow me to also congratulate and thank Ms. Sheila Greenland, teacher at Moose Kerr School, in her field since 1994 to 2017, 23 years of instructing our children. Being a teacher also means being a parent. At 8:30 in the morning to 3:30 in the afternoon, Sheila is responsible for our children, and makes every effort to teach them math, show them how to read, and how to write. It is people like Sheila who dedicate their time to our schools, and we are sad to see her leave. Sheila has dedicated her time to education both in Inuvik and Aklavik, and we wish her well in her future goals. Both ladies, Mr. Speaker, have a wealth of knowledge, and are going to be missed in the Delta. Good luck, Debbie, and good luck, Sheila. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Retiring Public Servants Debbie Greenland And Sheila Greenland
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Sahtu.

Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Members' Statements

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The NWT Housing Corporation released its survey, a 172-page document, right from homelessness to home ownership. Addressing the demands for the people in the Northwest Territories is challenge by itself. Firstly, I agree we cannot meet the demands for housing over the term of this Assembly; however, Mr. Speaker, efforts to minimize this continued demand would only be satisfactory.

Mr. Speaker, there are many obstacles. Our first encounter on delivery is our fiscal position. Although we have received limited federal funding assistance, I am supportive of the Housing Corporation in their efforts on forging ahead. Advancing forward with the limited means of what we have can only reassure the people of the Northwest Territories that we are trying. This unique part of Canada, with the many logistical challenges, provides our administration to champion these difficulties, and provide a product that serves the aspiration of the people in our small, remote communities.

I am also glad of the many strategies developed by this government, execution, and implementation. It is altogether a separate initiative. I look forward to areas of community consultation and engagements, and provide my extended efforts. Mr. Speaker, to maximize the implementation with positive additional results, the Housing Corporation should also undertake and conduct a policy efficiency review. Later, Mr. Speaker, I will have questions for the appropriate Minister. Mahsi.

Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Frame Lake.

GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Members' Statements

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. On February 14, 2017, I sent a Valentine's Day message to the Minister of Human Resources, in the form of a set of written questions regarding vacancy and overtime statistics. I recognize this was a complicated and lengthy set of questions, and that the department likely had to expend a fair amount of effort to pull together that information. I sincerely thank the Minister and his staff for pulling the information together.

Today, I offer some observations on that data tabled in this House on May 25th. The vacancies in our department for indeterminate positions from June 2016 to January 2017 vary from 98 to 136. That seems like a lot to me, and I wonder whether there is any way that we can make our recruitment efforts more efficient. Perhaps the most surprising thing I found in the data the Minister provided was that overtime payments for 2016-2017, from April to mid-February, totalled more than $11.42 million. The agencies and departments with the greatest overtime were:

● Stanton Hospital at $2.05 million;

● Transportation at $1.98 million;

● Environment and Natural Resources at $1.96 million;

● Justice at $1.16 million;

All of the other regional Health and Social Services authorities ranging from Yellowknife at $186,000 to the Delta Beaufort at $557,000; and

● Public Works and Services at $410,000.

Departmental overtime seems to have occurred mainly over the summer months of June, July, and August, and that makes sense given the fire and construction seasons. I didn't see any patterns in terms of the overtime for the Health and Social Services authorities, except it was highest in December over the holiday period.

Lastly, for sick leave, from April 2016 to mid-February 2017, 71,000 hours out of 117,000 total GNWT-wide hours, or about 61 per cent, are for employees in the Health and Social Services Authorities. Almost half of the total sick hours for departmental staff are found in the Justice department alone. I will have questions for the Minister of Human Resources, now known as the Minister of Finance, later today about how we can reduce our overtime and sick leave, and improve the quality of life for our valued employees. Merci, Mr. Speaker.

GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

City Of Yellowknife Living Wage
Members' Statements

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I welcome the changes that are coming to the NWT Child Benefit, and I appreciate that fact that there will be a group of people who have modest incomes who will now receive more money as a result of this benefit, and that is a good thing.

I want to give a little perspective, though, on how much money it actually costs to live in the NWT, and in Yellowknife in particular. A known profit organization here in Yellowknife contracted an economist to figure out what the living wage would be in Yellowknife, and in 2015, the answer was that a family of four with one child in school and one in childcare would need $80,000, and that would only cover their basics: food, shelter, childcare, transportation, clothing, and so on. What I want to underline here today is that income assistance, even with the addition of the child benefit, is still going to keep people in poverty who are now in poverty, if they are on income assistance.

Mr. Speaker, the living wage is based on the premise that no one who works full-time should live in poverty, and it offers a systemic solution to poverty by paying people who are working full-time a living wage. This is a campaign that has been undertaken across the country. There has been some uptake in the NWT, but the campaign at the moment is dormant because it has not been funded by the GNWT to continue. I want to stress the potential it has for people to earn enough money to meet their basic needs rather than depending on government handouts, which nobody wants at the end of the day. I would like to just provide that perspective today and to ask the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment in particular, who is now considering changes to a different category, the minimum wage, to consider what it really costs to live here in setting these rates. Thank you.

City Of Yellowknife Living Wage
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Offshore Drilling Policies
Members' Statements

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I rise today on our last sitting day to address an issue that has been bothering me for quite some time. It is indisputable that the North has an abundant wealth of petroleum resources. Many of those are located offshore in the Beaufort Delta. What we have heard from the Premier is opposition to the arctic drilling ban, and while I have some questions about that, what I really want to know is what we are doing to support oil and gas development in the Northwest Territories.

I know that the Minister, in his state of the economy address, shall we call it that, earlier this week, also touched on this issue, but one thing we are not addressing are the massive cuts we have made to the public service capacity to manage oil and gas resources. Five million dollars has been cut from their budgets. The Premier has made statements on one side saying, "We need this economic opportunity," while on the other side he has said, "Oil and gas is gone for the foreseeable future." I would like to challenge him on those statements. We have a huge amount of work ahead of ourselves to get the North ready for offshore drilling, if that is the direction we want to take. Oil companies cannot ensure that they can properly address problems that happen on rigs. We all know that some of these offshore rigs have huge challenges with environmental damages when the proper spill responses are not in place, and the Arctic Ocean has been identified as one of those major challenges. I do not see any work ongoing to address those challenges or to put government processes and regulations in place that are going to allow us to assure Northerners that we can deliver prosperity through an oil and gas regime that protects our very fragile arctic environment.

We cannot ignore these problems, and we cannot just stand up and criticize another government's decision, which is their right to make, without addressing these concerns. If we are going to do oil and gas, let's make sure we have the possibility, the capacity, to do it right. I am going to be asking the Premier if he can clarify that work is going on, and if we can assure our residents that we can deliver both economic prosperity and environmental protection, because that is what Northerners today expect from their government. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Offshore Drilling Policies
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Deh Cho.

Reflections On Aboriginal Day 2017
Members' Statements

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Looking ahead, June 21st will be Aboriginal Day. I just wanted to take a moment to talk about that day, in particular here in the NWT and across Canada, when Indigenous people across this nation are trying to reflect upon their history and look forward in terms of trying to determine their place in Canadian society and, on a big important front, our place in the world. I just wanted to reflect in my language in terms of seeking some points for people to consider as they gather during the summer.

[English translation not provided.]

Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to wish everyone a good summer. There are going to be a lot of important meetings, and one thing that elders have always stated to us is that we need to work together, and I think that is a message that people should consider throughout the Assembly in the summertime. Mahsi.

Reflections On Aboriginal Day 2017
Members' Statements

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Colleagues, I would like to draw your attention to our guests in the gallery. Former legislative librarian for our Assembly, Ms. Vera Raschke. Ms. Raschke is joined by her fellow retired legislative librarians, Ms. Lynn Brodie of the Library of Parliament of Canada, and Ms. Donna Burton of the Ontario Legislative Library. Welcome, and what part of retirement don't you three understand? Thanks. Masi for joining us. Thanks for being here. It is always great to have an audience as part of our proceedings. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nahendeh.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize the Indigenous group of people from Colombia. I would like to thank them for showing up here. As well, two friends of mine, Mary, I will not try to say your last name, because I think the speaker did a good job. And of course, Mr. Steven Cooper, who is unfortunately a long-time friend of mine. He knows all my stories, and I have to say thank you for keeping the stories quiet, but remember, if you share stories, I share stories. I would like to thank him, and I would like to thank his firm and his staff for doing all the good work for Aboriginal people in the Northwest Territories and across Canada. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Sahtu.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to recognize our guests in the gallery here today, and I also recognize our two Pages from Fort Good Hope, Arianna Laboucan, and Patricia Mukhamadieva. I think that is how you pronounce it, Mr. Speaker. I also want to thank everybody. Like my previous colleagues, I wish everybody a safe summer. Mahsi.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Frame Lake.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I would like to recognize one of our Pages, Michael Le. He is a resident of the Frame Lake riding, and he is a student at the Weledeh School. I just want to thank all the Pages for their work during this short sitting and congratulate them all on their selection for serving us and working with us over the duration of the last week. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife South.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to recognize two Pages from Yellowknife South, Elle Mitchener and Drew Wolfe, and I thank them for providing services to the Assembly and also to all the other Pages. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Thebacha.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize all our guests in the gallery, in particular Steven Cooper, a colleague of mine for many years. I would also like to recognize and thank two of the Pages from Fort Smith: Hannah Porter and Bronwyn Rutherford-Simon. Thank you.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Kam Lake.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to take this opportunity to recognize and thank all the Pages for their hard work over this sitting. I would also like to recognize my constituency assistant, Mr. Garett Cochrane. I couldn't do this job without him, and I am very appreciative that he is joining us here today. Thank you.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure to introduce my partner, Janice McKenna, who lives in the same riding as I do, and I want to thank her for her ongoing support for me in this job. As everybody here knows, this is a job that takes a real toll on families and family life. I appreciate the fact that she is always so supportive. Mahsi.

Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. If we have missed anyone in the gallery, thank you for being here with us. It is always great to have an audience as part of our proceedings. Masi. Item 6, acknowledgments. Item 7, oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this past Wednesday the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment and his department had the opportunity to present to the Standing Committee on Social Development on the NWT Education Renewal initiative. Mr. Speaker, it was a really good, very informative, and good presentation. Today, my questions are directed to the Minister around some parts of this presentation. Mr. Speaker, can the Minister please explain to this House what type of course material is being developed as it pertains to Northern Studies 20 and 30? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Currently, we just have Northern Studies 10 in the curriculum that is being offered throughout the Northwest Territories. We do have a Wise People Committee made up of Indigenous and non-Indigenous leaders that is currently working on a Northern Studies 20 and 30. Following the same process that we did with Northern Studies 10, the Northern Studies 20 and 30, under direction of the Wise People Committee, are looking at exploration and developments of things like land claims, treaties, self-governments that are all going to be focused on Northern Studies 20 and 30. That is the direction that they are moving toward: letting our youth and our people who take our Northern Studies 20 and 30 courses, when we start offering them, learn about their culture, their traditions, as well as their history. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for his answer. Mr. Speaker, this is very exciting news, as we educate our youth on the history of the Northwest Territories. Mr. Speaker, my understanding is Northern Studies 10 is a course requirement for students to graduate. Will these other two Northern Studies courses be deemed prerequisites for our students to graduate? If so, why?

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Yes, currently Northern Studies 10 is a required course to graduate for all NWT students in the Northwest Territories. What is exciting about Northern Studies 10 is that the curriculum is around residential schools, so our students learn about residential schools and how they are part of our history in the North and throughout Canada. Northern Studies 20 and 30, there is a lot of interest with our Aboriginal governments who we have been consulting with. As I have mentioned in the House, Alberta is redesigning their curriculum, and we have our staff who are working with staff in Alberta to redesign the curriculum.

We are going to try to see if there is an opportunity that our Northern Studies 20 and 30 courses can also be the equivalent to Social Studies 20 and 30. Those talks are in discussions with the Alberta government, and as you know, we are unique in the North and we follow the Alberta curriculum. We are going to see if that is a possibility. As I mentioned, those talks are currently happening right now.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for his answer on two of my other questions. I thank him very much for that. Can the Minister please advise us as to when we think we will see this being implemented for the school year?

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Yes, as I mentioned, we do have a committee that is currently working on it. We are collaborating with our Aboriginal governments, engaging our Aboriginal governments on what they would like to see in this curriculum. It is very important to get their knowledge, so that we can in return teach our youth in the school system. I imagine over the next two or three years, I think the curriculum will be completed, and hopefully delivered in the school system.

Question 809-18(2): Expansion Of Northern Studies Curriculum
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Earlier today, I offered some observations on statistics for employees as provided by the Minister of Human Resources, now the Minister of Finance. There appear to be about 100 vacant, undetermined departmental positions at any given time. Can the Minister explain whether this is comparable to other jurisdictions, and what efforts we are making to improve our recruitment efficiency? Merci, Mr. Speaker.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Finance.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the GNWT is a very large organization. Staff turnover and vacancies are a reality. Our vacancies do change from day to day. As of March 31 of this year, our vacancy rate was 3.4 per cent. I don't have comparisons with other governments, but we would assume that our rate would be similar to the national average across the economy. We put various efforts towards recruitment and filling vacancies, including the use of competitive process, transfer assignments, development opportunities, direct appointments, and regional recruitment programs. Also, the intern program that we have is very successful. As I was saying in the House earlier this session, the summer student would also be another excellent recruitment tool.

We have 272 plus, I believe, another 46 or 50 offers that were still out there, so those are the different types of recruitment strategies that we are using. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I thank the Minister for his response. Our government is spending a lot of money, more than $11 million between April 2016 and mid-February 2017, on overtime. Can the Minister explain what efforts we are making to reduce overtime, and whether that includes hiring more full-time staff at a reduced cost?

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

We haven't hired more full-time staff, but we have introduced full-time relief positions to provide coverage where needed. Relief employees say they are an important part of the GNWT, and their use is a very important part of ensuring that vital programs and services are provided to the residents of the Northwest Territories without interruption. As of December 31, 2016, the GNWT has had 374 relief employees, and overtime is authorized for operations required as necessary to support our programs, services, and delivery. In the Member's statement, he quoted the number of departments that do have a lot of overtime, and it is a lot of the departments where they are fairly stressful jobs, so there are times when folks need to be called in to relieve the employees who are there.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I thank the Minister again for that information. I am glad that he recognizes that overtime is stressful on our employees, and that the idea of relief workers is a good one. I will be tracking this during the rest of my term, certainly. As I mentioned earlier today, though, a great deal of the overtime is concentrated in Health and Social Services authorities, and Stanton hospital alone accounted for 18 per cent of the overtime costs. This may not come as a surprise to our healthcare and social workers, but I believe this is causing a lot of stress and burnout. What is our government doing to reduce overtime particularly in the Health and Social Services authorities and at Stanton hospital, which is actually in my riding? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as I mentioned before, there are a lot of relief positions that we have and there is some overtime that does happen within the health authorities. Part of that can be attributable to the fact that it is a highly stressful job and there are times when the regular workers can't make it in so they have to call a relief person in. There was a study, in my understanding, done a few years ago, I think, by Health and Social Services on the amount of overtime that was being used across the health authorities in the Northwest Territories. My understanding is there was no particular recommendations that came out of that, but I will follow up with the Minister of Health and Social Services to see if I can obtain a copy of the study that was done and I will share the information with the Member.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I truly do appreciate the commitment of the Minister to look into that and provide further information to us on this side. Sick leave hours for employers are concentrated in the Health and Social Services authorities and in the Department of Justice. While I can understand how health and social workers are often overworked and need to take sick leaves, it's not clear what is happening in Justice. Can the Minister explain these patterns of sick leave and what are we doing to improve employee wellness? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, we can do some analysis. However, in 24-7 continued operations where shift work is required, if you notice a pattern, there does seem to be some sick leave but that's working 24-7. The health and wellness are in the workplace are a key initiative of the NWT, and this includes raising awareness about the GNWT Employee and Family Assistance Program as well as providing a variety of education sessions on health and wellness related topics. There was also a suggestion earlier in this Assembly about the concept of having Shane Days as well.

Question 810-18(2): GNWT Employee Vacancies And Overtime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. On the issue of offshore drilling, most Arctic nations have noted several concerns related to offshore drilling. The environmental sensitivity, remote locations with limited access, oil spill response, and winter Arctic conditions, limited Arctic class drilling and marine infrastructure, late season operating challenges such as limited daylight and ice conditions. The proposed solutions to these problems haven't often worked. I'd like to ask the Premier if he believes that industry is positioned well enough to safely conduct Arctic drilling in our waters or offshore of the Northwest Territories. Thank you.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. There have been over 100 wells drilled in the Beaufort Sea and we have not had a blow-out like they have had in the Gulf of Mexico. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Well, I appreciate that we've been safe so far, but these problems persist. This is the reason why a ban was put in place by Canada. I'd just like to take a minute to quote from debates in Hansard of February 2, 2013, when the Premier said:

"The Government of the Northwest Territories is focused on managing the business of the territory. It has to be our primary objective not telling the Government of Canada how it should do its business. Further, we aren't the federal opposition. We're governing our own right and we need to concentrate on managing our own affairs. We will continue to work with the federal government and raise issues that matter to Northerners."

So why has the Premier now taken a different approach to this, which seems not to respect the jurisdiction of Canada; and instead of working with Canada to find a solution to the challenges related to offshore drilling, we've condemned them in a political forum. Can the Premier answer that, why his approach has changed and his relationship with Canada on this issue?

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

The Member is quite quick to put words into my mouth, but I'll set the record straight. We were a bit opposed to the process and approach that the Government of Canada took to impose a permanent moratorium and ban on oil and gas drilling in the Beaufort Sea. That's what we're opposed to. We have wanted a system that would be safe and protect the environment. We believe in balance, development, and to permanently ban oil and gas drilling without input from people most affected without any economic development strategy in place to offset the jobs that would be lost, to leave trillions of dollars' worth of oil and gas in the ground, I think is abandoning the responsibility. Also, we negotiated in good faith the Devolution Agreement with the Government of Canada. Part of that Devolution Agreement was that we would negotiate the coal management of the Beaufort Sea and the offshore and also how resource revenues would be dealt with. That's what we're concerned about.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

I appreciate that explanation from the Premier. There's a clause in that Devolution Agreement that allows us to take disputes through that process. Is the Premier going to use the Devolution Agreement to bring Canada to task on this issue? I should point out that it's not a permanent ban. It's a five-year ban that can be revisited, so is the Premier going to wait for five years until we can revisit that decision or are we going to access the Devolution Agreement to start these negotiations early and as he's clearly stated, he's a strong believer in this economic opportunity. Are we going to make it happen through the Devolution Agreement?

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I'm a strong believer that, if we pontificate on something, we should make sure we get the facts right. In this case, it is a permanent ban and the Prime Minister has written to me to confirm that and, as well, he has stated that they would review the need for a moratorium every five years. I've also written to him expressing my concern about the fact that we have had no responses to our request to get on with a negotiation of offshore management. He wrote back and indicated that he has put together a reviewed team led by Minister Carr and Minister Bennett in which they will be undertaking a one-year consultation process with existing offshore oil and gas rights holders to seek views on their interest. This process will engage key partners including rights holders, territorial governments, and land claim agreement holders. These consultations will be an opportunity to discuss a number of issues that you have raised including home management and resource revenue arrangements in the Beaufort Sea. We believe that those are legal commitments and that we should get on with it and it's not something that we should tie on to some other process where we can just raise it.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. It sounds like the Premier is starting to understand what it's like to be a Regular Member. Often, we raise concerns that are put to study or put to an internal working group when we're not at the tables, so perhaps this will inform his relationship when we're working with the government to find out how to make good decisions for people. My last question, Mr. Speaker, we've cut $5 million out of our public service capacity to address oil and gas development in the Northwest Territories. With what little is left, is that being used to address these issues and to develop an appropriate response to offshore drilling? Thank you.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker, there's an old saying about shutting the barn door after the cows have left the barn. We have no oil and gas development production going on in the Northwest Territories as of this date. If you look around the territory, there's not one drop of oil being produced. A large part of this is the oil and gas moratorium in the Beaufort where everything is shut down and, since then, there's been no other oil and gas development. People have lost confidence in their ability. If the federal government can wipe away trillions of dollars of oil and gas in one swipe, then how do you expect industry to invest millions of dollars to develop? As a government, if there is no activity what do you want these people to do? If there is nothing going on, do you want them to sit there? That is why we have taken the approach that we are going to get ready, we are going to develop an oil and gas strategy, and when oil and gas industry comes back, if it comes back, we will be ready to go. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 811-18(2): Offshore Drilling Policies
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Sahtu.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I mentioned in my Member's statement, my question is to the Minister of Housing. My first question: will the Voices on Housing survey be shared with the community leaders to a public forum? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the NWT Housing Corporation.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I had previously made a commitment and I have made that commitment at every meeting that I have made, bilateral meetings, individual meetings with Aboriginal governments, municipal governments. I have committed to sharing the Voices on Housing report to Aboriginal and municipal governments, and I will do that, but it will not probably be in a public forum. The reason is because I need to get them out timely and we have 33 communities all with municipal governments and Aboriginal governments. There are huge lists, and if I was to do them all individually it would take me many, many months. So, no, I will be distributing the information via letter. We are in the process of doing that now, and it is not that I would not like to it publically. It is that we need to be timely in the distribution. Thank you. Mr. Speaker.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Will the Minister commit to a regional Sahtu forum to engage in the delivery of the survey?

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Again, as I stated in the previous question, I have already made commitments to the Aboriginal municipal governments to get them out in a timely basis. It was tabled the other day, and so we are working on getting it out immediately. However, I have not done the Sahtu tour yet, and there was a commitment made by our Premier to get Ministers out into all the communities. So I would be more than willing to do a tour of the Sahtu to be able to take any input that the communities may have in any of the portfolios that I carry, including the Voices on Housing document.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thanks for that response to the Minister. The attraction in the Sahtu this time of year is very ideal for fishing. As part of the consultation here, will the Minister commit to developing an action plan based on the survey so that a next step engagement is consulted with the forum if it is on a regional basis, and commit to that action plan being delivered as well?

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Now that the survey is completed, we are in the process of actually developing an action plan not for the dissimilation of the material, but also to make sure that we meet all the needs and that we address the policies and programs in a timely manner, defining which ones can be solved early, which ones will take more consultation and time to deliver. So we are developing an action plan on how to do that now? We are going to try to be as inclusive of communities as possible in the determination of the final policies, so once we roll out with the policies we will be looking for feedback. At this point, I cannot say what that feedback will look like because we are still developing that strategy.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Sahtu.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I look forward to engaging community consultations or a regional forum with the Minister, so would the Minister provide me some suggested dates here over the coming summer on the availability to discuss in some form to include community leaders of the Sahtu and also discuss some of the fruits of the labour of this document here for the rest of the term so the general public can have an idea what are the objectives for the term of this government? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As stated before, I am more than willing to visit the Sahtu region for a constituency tour to address all issues that community members in that region may have including the housing survey, and I am committing to try to be as inclusive as possible in the development of the policies and the new programs going forward. However, I cannot state yet what that would look like because we are still developing the plan on how to roll that out.

Question 812-18(2): Results Of The NWT Housing Corporation Engagement Survey
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, earlier in the week, the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment issued a good statement about the NWT apprenticeship and trades strategy. The Minister's statement described efforts to connect industry and employers through partnerships in education and training. I am wondering: can the Minister give us more detail on industry partnerships the government has developed to support increased training and employment and how are we going to get these kids in front of potential employers? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. First off, I just want to thank the Member for his support and encouragement for our students participating in the National Skills Canada Competition, and good luck to those students as well. We do have some really good students up here in the skills area. Along with the strategy that we did table earlier and made comments about, we do have a board that is made up of mostly industry. It is an industry-driven board. So they do a lot of the work and we work through that board to get a lot of this information out. They come up with a lot of the ideas on how we should move forward in terms of putting the strategy forward, and in the strategy we do have a lot of key actions that we are going to be working to complete and address, and it is mostly through this industry-driven board and working with our department that we are going to be focusing on getting those students into the job industry.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you to the Minister for his reply and his acknowledgement to my Member's statement. I appreciate that. Mr. Speaker, in the Minister's statement he also talked about how they will be implementing incentives for employers and in particular encouraging target groups like Indigenous residents and women to consider careers in the trades and that is good, but I would like to elaborate with the Minister and ask him: can he describe the ways in which the department will encourage the women and Indigenous people themselves to participate in trades and apprenticeship?

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

The resources that are going to be used to encourage this is through the schools. We will talk with students in the schools, as well as our career development officers, our employment transition officers that go out into the communities and actually get this information to those that might be on income assistance or looking at a career moving forward, and most recently we also made an announcement and an improvement into our small community employment support program that does on-the-job training, so we will work with our Aboriginal groups. As you heard earlier, one of my colleagues mentioned that we do have these bilateral meetings and this is something that we can continue to support and work together with our stakeholders and partners throughout the Northwest Territories to encourage more Indigenous people getting to the trades or into the workforce, as well as women into the trades and other workforces.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you to the Minister once again for a good answer on that. I think the small community support program will be an excellent way in which to accomplish that. Mr. Speaker, the Minister's statement says that approximately 4,700 apprentices have been certified under the government's apprenticeship program. That is, in my view, a success. Does the department have any figures to indicate how many of those people remain in the NWT currently? Have we been tracking northern employment retention in the trades?

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

That is one of the goals of our strategy, is to keep a northern workforce here in the North working, as well as looking at recruiting others to come up here and help industry for the in-demand jobs that we are seeing that is out there. I don't have the exact data in front of me of how many are still here and how many we are recruiting, but I can get that information for the Member and share it with him.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and yes, I would agree that that is an important aspect. I mean, if we are the ones putting the effort and the investment into our youth and having them become successful trades journeypeople, well, then we would like to see them stay here in the North and be contributors here. Mr. Speaker, we obviously live in changing times. I would like to know: how does the department ensure that it stays on top of changing industry trends and technical innovations to make sure that our apprentices and tradespeople have the most up-to-date knowledge and skills possible? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and with our Apprenticeship, Trades and Occupational Certification Board, when we have meetings with them, get updates, we will ensure that. This is a concern of the Member, but I am sure they stay on top of it. It is industry-driven, so anything new and innovative that we are doing in industry, I am sure the board is on top of that. I have full trust and confidence that they are working in the best interests of industry, but also in the best interests of Northerners, and we will make sure that is part of the next discussions that we have with the board.

Question 813-18(2): Apprenticeship And Trades Industry Partnerships
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. On our last sitting, I brought up the issue of airline passengers arriving at the Yellowknife Airport late at night; you know, if a flight is delayed, maybe at 1:00 in the morning or so, and then having to catch their connecting flight to Hay River early the next morning. The issue was that the airport would close for about a 90-minute window, and these people have to find somewhere to stay. Often there are no hotel rooms, and I know people who were lucky enough that a cab driver let them sleep on their couch for those couple hours. I asked the Minister about this before. He told me that, once Bill 7 passes, the revolving fund, which it did, they would start looking into this. Today he made a statement on the Yellowknife Airport Evolution, and I am wondering is a plan to keep the airport open 24 hours in the works so that his constituents do not have to sleep on strangers' couches. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As I stated in the House today, as we move forward on July 1st with the revolving fund for the airport, we believe it is going to be an economic driver for the City of Yellowknife and the citizens of the Northwest Territories. I believe that is something that we are going to have to have a look at through the business process. As I have said in the House, we have a number of consultative committees that look at this issue, and I will make sure that this is one of the ones that is on the table for them to have a look at moving forward. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Maybe someday, I guess. The Minister also mentioned the Department of Infrastructure is working with carriers on new or expanded routes. I know airfare and air travel into Hay River is a major issue. Can the Minister confirm whether or not the Department of Infrastructure is working on bringing new air carriers into the Yellowknife-Hay River route or perhaps working on a route from Yellowknife to Edmonton that stops in Hay River?

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Our job is not to lobby airline industries for which routes they take. Our job is to put the practices and opportunities in place that allow for businesses to develop in the Northwest Territories. I believe we have done that setting up the revolving fund. What came out of that, as soon as we brought this initiative forward, we had a number of air carriers get a hold of the department about possible routes coming particularly to the YZF airport around the revolving fund. I think that is an ongoing basis, and I think there are great opportunities particularly for the YZF airport.

I will speak to Hay River in short, as I know the Mayor of Hay River has raised this as a concern. I know he has reached out to a couple carriers in specific to try to get them to bring opportunities to Hay River and have a look at it. I believe as the economy in the South Slave picks up with a couple of initiatives that we are looking at moving forward down there, there will be an opportunity maybe for an air carrier to have a better look at it, and the economies of scales will work a little bit better for them. I personally have reached out to one carrier myself, too, to ask them to have a look at the situation in Hay River.

Question 814-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Hours Of Operation
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, yesterday in Committee of the Whole, we rolled the money for the sobering centre into the current year's spending because the money had not been spent last year. So it seems like a good time to ask the Minister of Health and Social Services for an update on creating a sobering centre in Yellowknife. Thank you.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have been in the Assembly for a large number of years now, and this has been possibly one of the most frustrating files that I have worked on. Something that should be such a good news story has turned out to be quite a frustration. We had hoped we would have a location by now. We have had several locations that we thought we were very close on, and for a variety of reasons such as contaminations in buildings, inability to get leases, we have not been able to get a firm location. We have come up with a temporary solution that will be beginning shortly. We are looking at doing some joint releases with the city. I will not say what that is at this point in time, but I did share it with the Members. The Members did get an update by e-mail where we are, and I did indicate that we are working on a joint release with the city. At that point, I will be making it public to residents of Yellowknife in the North. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I thank the Minister for his answer. I understand that what he is working on now is a temporary solution. Could he please talk about what he is doing toward a long-term solution?

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

We have to look at this in a short-, medium-, and long-term approach. We do have something in the works for the short term, which we hope to be announcing very shortly, in cooperation with the city, who has been a fantastic partner on this. In the medium-term, well, we have to put it in medium-term because there is a longer plan in place. We have looked to acquire and put a hold on the downtown location, which is the Yellowknife Day Care at this point. They are vacating the building. The GNWT owns the building. That building does have to come down. We believe that that is a prime location for a sobering centre day shelter in the downtown core, but we will not be able to move onto that site for approximately two years, which means we have to come up with a medium-term solution.

For the medium-term solution, we are looking at a number of different properties in Yellowknife. We have got two that are possible. I would hate to say what those properties are because we have had lots of properties that got really close, almost to the point where we were ready to do some retrofitting, and have failed at the last minute due to environmental remediation or other issues. So we have a short-term solution we are going to be announcing shortly. We are still looking for the medium-term, and we have a long-term plan for a future sobering centre day shelter here in Yellowknife.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Lots of good news in that answer. What I hear is that it is really the medium-term now that presents problems. I am sure that this is a very high priority for you to provide continuity of service once the sobering centre opens. I know that this has been frustrating, that there have been a lot of setbacks. What kinds of new approaches can you take to try and work with landlords or repurpose GNWT-owned assets to find that medium-term solution?

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Last time we talked about this in the House, I was inundated, thankfully, with just a large number of people saying, "Have you tried this building?" "Have you looked at that property?" "Have you followed up with?" The answer in most situations is, yes, we have looked at those properties. We've talked to those landlords. We've been looking for a solution. There were a couple that were a little bit more difficult because it involved moving GNWT staff and re-profiling billing just as the Member has suggested. We are looking at some current GNWT space that we might have to take our staff out of and relocate. I'm not going to name those places at this point in time because we're still working on some of the details and there's another property that may be available. We're trying to ascertain whether or not that is something we can get on the medium-term basis.

I've made the mistake, Mr. Speaker, of saying we're close a couple of times on a medium-term solution, so I'm going to cautious. I want to say that we're going to have something in place shortly. The only thing I can say for sure is we've got a short-term solution in place that we're going to announce shortly. That will take us to the end of September. We're really hoping we can find a medium-term solution because, as the Member has said, continuity on this is going to be critical.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Again, I'd like to thank the Minister for his response. In addition to the physical location of the sobering centre, could the Minister please review what kind of staffing and services will be available in that facility? Thank you.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Department of Health and Social Services has talked to the stakeholders. We have listened to the comments and suggestions from Members. We have put together a bit of a program design on how a sobering centre would operate here in the Northwest Territories and that has often driven the size of the location we need to have and how many beds we can support. So we already have that in place. I'm happy to share that with committee if committee is interested. I'm happy to come and have a conversation with committee and provide them with a bit of an update on where we are as far as programming. We haven't been there to that point so far because we've been struggling to find a location, but I'm happy to meet with committee at their request.

Question 815-18(2): Creation Of A Yellowknife Sobering Centre
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to follow up with some more questions to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. During the presentation on Wednesday, the Minister and his staff spoke about healthier relationship programming. Can the Minister briefly explain to us what that program involves? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As stated in the NWT Safe Schools Legislation and Regulations, every school in the NWT is required to offer healthy relationship programming to its students. Our department works with the University of Western Ontario Centre for School Mental Health to deliver a healthy relationship training program for NWT grades 7 to 10, teachers, and other school staff. The evidence-based program is for grades 7 to 10 students. It teaches students how to build relationship skills, understanding of making safe decisions about substance abuse, sexual relationships, bullying, as well as violence. That's the main focus of these healthy relationships. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that explanation. It's great to hear what they're doing there. Can the Minister advise us how this program was promoted during implementation?

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Approximately 225 NWT teachers across the North have been trained in the healthy relationships program called "The Fourth R." Training is provided to all NWT schools free of charge as well through continued working through the partnerships that we do have with the University of Western Ontario and as part of a federally- funded research project on youth and mental health. We work with our partnerships with the University of Western Ontario. We offer it to all schools in the Northwest Territories, and any schools that haven't received the training or feel that they might want more training, just contact their education authorities or the superintendents to get that training offered.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for his answer. This is very important program and I appreciate the department for the work they're doing in this area, especially with all the bullying that we hear about through the news and from what I'm hearing from parents. Can the Minister explain how this information is shared with parents in the DA member annually so they know that this is a system that the Education Department is implementing in all schools across the Northwest Territories?

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

As part of regular school businesses, both schools and education bodies have the responsibility to get any type of information that we work with these education authorities or initiatives of the department to the parents and to people that are doing work inside the schools. DE members are informed about school programs through their principals and their superintendents and the requirements such a program as well as it is required under the Safe and Caring Schools Legislation Regulation. It is a responsibility of our education authorities, our principals and superintendents to make sure this information is shared with parents.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I thank the Minister for his answer. I guess I'm struggling with some of the parents not hearing about it, and it is something like that. I guess, is the Minister able to provide me and other Regular Members with an update package so we can better understand this program and actually help promote this process so that parents are aware of how our education system is working and how we're making it healthier and better for our students? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We did make a commitment during the presentation that we had to standing committee the other night and we'll make that commitment in the House that we will get those packages, Safe and Caring School packages to all Members should they want them, but we'll make sure that the honourable Member from Nahendeh gets the package and that all Members that would like one, we'll get one to them as well.

Question 816-18(2): Healthy Relations Training For Educators
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We spent a lot of time this sitting debating education. I'd like to ask the Minister of Education now how the ambitious plans for post-secondary education are rolling out of the departmental level and if he can give an update to the House on the work to date on developing a thorough post-secondary education regime to the Northwest Territories. Thank you.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Education, Culture and Employment

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. As all Members know, we are currently going to conduct the foundational review. I believe we're still waiting for feedback on the terms of reference that's before committee, and as soon as we get those terms of reference back on this foundational review, we'll go ahead and move and see the structure within our Aurora College system but also looking at utilizing our community learning centres a lot more and taking direction from our Skills 4 Success focus and also working with our partners' continued support with our other partners that run post-secondary programming. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Sadly, it sounds like not much has changed. I'm particularly interested in post-secondary academic education. I think the community learning centres do an amazing job, but I'm more focused on the degree granting institutions. I know that the Minister committed to doing a bit of work on this, developing some legislation around it. Can he provide an update on that legislative process and when we're going to be able to grant northern degrees from northern institutions here in the North?

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Yes, we are currently working on that legislation. We are going to be doing some consultations during the summer months and then get the feedback from our stakeholders and partners on that and then proceed forward. However, we're still going to have to look at the foundational review of the port where we are going in terms of post-secondary, which I made a commitment to the House to look at that foundational review with the Aurora College but also getting feedback from other institutions and other stakeholders in the Northwest Territories regarding the legislation that the Member has been bringing up.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

We're still at the consultation stage. I think that's helpful for understanding our progress to date. In addition to northern institutions, their willing partners are very close to us in northern Alberta who have been trying to make inroads with our student population. Has the Minister had any interaction with these institutions in trying to bring their programming into the North and make it more accessible to Northerners?

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Yes, and we also support our students going to those institutions for post-secondary program. In 2016-2017, there was over $60 million paid in Student Financial Assistance benefits supporting our students to go to post-secondary education down south. We continue to work with partners at the University of Alberta, University of Regina, University of Saskatoon, University of Victoria, for some programs that we currently are delivering within the Aurora College, and we will continue to enhance and build on those partnerships.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Thank you to the Minister for that. I appreciate that the government provides probably the best support in Canada for students attending university down south. I am going to re-ask that question with just a bit of different language. Rather than send our students to these institutions, can we bring these institutions to the North? Can they establish a campus or a branch here? Has he had those discussions, and is he working toward that goal? Thank you.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and yes, we have had discussions with the partners that we are currently in agreements with, and as I mentioned, we are going through this foundational review right now. We are just waiting on the terms of reference feedback from standing committee. We will go ahead and proceed on that foundational review, and hopefully in the early new year, 2018, we will be moving forward and hopefully have some good structured programs in the 2018-2019 academic year.

Question 817-18(2): Post-Secondary Educational Regime
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I have some questions for the Minister of Infrastructure. Can he tell us when these fabulous new airport improvement fees are actually going to come into effect? Is it going to be July 1st? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would have to look up the exact details, but it comes into effect July 1st, so I suspect the airport improvement fee will come into effect on that date and the landing fees as well. I think there was discussion with committee that people who had booked airline tickets prior to the implementation of this date would be offset, and those charges would not be applied to them for the fees. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks to the Minister for that response. A few more questions about the Yellowknife Airport Evolution statement that he made earlier today. I know I had asked previously whether the terms of reference for the Economic Advisory Committee were public, and now there are two more committees, an Airline Consultative Committee and an Airline Operating Committee. I am kind of confused here, but are there terms of reference for each of these, and can the Minister provide them to this side and make them public?

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As we went through the planning of this, we have made it quite clear that there were these other committees. I am sure that they are in a public realm, and they could be made available to the Member.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks to the Minister for his response. I am not sure they are actually in the public realm yet, and that is why I am asking. So he has got commitment to share them with this side, and I am sure he is going to make sure that they are posted immediately to the Infrastructure website, but the economic advisory committee, has his deputy minister made the appointments to that body yet?

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

The deputy has shared some names with me of people who have either approached us about having their name submitted and some possibilities, but I do not believe that those positions have been determined yet.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. Thanks to the Minister for that response. Of course, I have expressed in this House my view that I think the appointments should be made by the Minister himself rather than a deputy minister, but when those names are finalized, is there a commitment from the Minister to release them publicly and make them available to the Members on this side as well? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, I can do that for the Member.

Question 818-18(2): Yellowknife Airport Evolution
Oral Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Item 7, written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written Question 23-18(2): School Funding Framework
Written Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I have two written questions today. For the first one, my questions are for the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment. The Minister provided Regular Members with the most recent version of its School Funding Framework that I tabled in the House yesterday. Can the Minister:

1. Identify the number of students enrolled in junior kindergarten alone, and in kindergarten to grade 12 cumulatively, and each school offering the Junior Kindergarten Program in 2016-2017;

2. Provide departmental projections of the above for 2017-2018; and

3. Identify differences between current K-12 funding and that same funding if it accounted for JK-12 in the items below, using estimated 2017-2018 enrolment figures and the formulas set out in the framework shared with Regular Members:

4. School Funding Framework – Administration – Administration O and M – item (i), Administration and School Services: (Administration Staffing for Assistant Superintendents, Administration Officers and Clerical Staff according to the tables);

5. School Funding Framework – Administration – Administration O and M – item (ii), District Education Authorities O and M: (Community Base of $15,000 + K-12 FTE x $86);

6. School Funding Framework – Territorial Schools – item (iii) – School Support Consultants: funded according to established table;

7. School Funding Framework – Territorial Schools – item (iv) – School Counselling: (K-12 community FTE x 0.0032);

8. School Funding Framework – Territorial Schools – item (v) – School Secretaries: (K-12 community FTE x 0.00028);

9. School Funding Framework – Territorial Schools – item (vi) – Custodians: (K12 community FTE x 0.0102);

10. School Funding Framework – Inclusive Schooling – item (iv) – Support Assistants: (Community K-12 FTE / 63);

11. School Funding Framework – Inclusive Schooling – item (vi) – Staff Development – Base funding of $2,000 per community + (community K-12 FTE x $50) x NCI;

12. School Funding Framework – Inclusive Schooling – item (vii) – Specialized Learning Materials / Assistive Technology: [Education Authority $10,000 base for minor projects + Base funding of $2,000 per community + (community K-12 FTE x $62)] x NCI;

13. School Funding Framework – Inclusive Schooling – item (x) – Healing and Counselling: Base funding of $10,000 per community + ($60 per K-12 FTE x NCI);

14. School Funding Framework – Aboriginal Languages & Cultural Programs – item (i) – Aboriginal Languages O and M: (Base funding of $100,000 per education authority) + ($9,000 x number of communities minus one) + (Aboriginal K-12 FTE x $125) x NCI; and

15. School Funding Framework – Aboriginal Language & Cultural Programs – item (ii): Education Assistants / Aboriginal Language specialists (EA/ALS): Aboriginal K-12 FTE per community, according to established table?

Merci, Monsieur le President.

Written Question 23-18(2): School Funding Framework
Written Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written Question 24-18(2): Consultancy Contract With Earnscliffe Strategy Group
Written Questions

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. For my second question, my questions are for the Premier. Members of Cabinet and their support staff travelled to Ottawa in November 2016 for intergovernmental meetings and parliamentary presentations. In his January 31, 2017 reply to my written question, the Premier said that "there were no lobbyists or consultants engaged in the planning or coordination of this trip." Can the Premier explain why we pay the lobbyist firm Earnscliffe Strategy Group more than $120,000 per year to provide "media and government relations and communications" services in Ottawa, but did not use services during the one visit the full-time Cabinet made to Ottawa last year?

1. Did any of the seven Cabinet Ministers and 15 staff members participating in the trip to Ottawa meet with any representative of the Earnscliffe Strategy Group during the November 2016 trip to Ottawa?

2. Why did the Earnscliffe Strategy Group invoice the GNWT for a total of $30,450 for October, November, and December 2016 service if the firm did not provide services before, during, or after the visit?

3. Why the Federal Lobbyist Registry describing the activity of Earnscliffe on behalf of the GNWT says Earnscliffe, arranging meetings with the federal representatives, when we do not have these services while in Ottawa?

4. Will the Premier provide a copy of the Executive Indigenous Affairs Department's contract with Earnscliffe Strategy Group?

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Written Question 24-18(2): Consultancy Contract With Earnscliffe Strategy Group
Written Questions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Written questions. Item 9, returns to written questions. Item 10, replies to Commissioner's opening address. Item 11, petitions. Item 12, reports of standing and special committees. Item 13, reports of committees on the review of bills. Item 14, tabling of documents. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Tabled Document 406-18(2): Knowledge Agenda: Northern Research For Northern Principles, May 2017
Tabling of Documents

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following document entitled "Knowledge Agenda: Northern Research for Northern Principles." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 406-18(2): Knowledge Agenda: Northern Research For Northern Principles, May 2017
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Tabled Document 408-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 503-18(2): Northern Frontier Visitors Centre
Tabling of Documents

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents entitled "Communities and Diamonds 2016 Annual Report," and "Follow-up Letter for Oral Question 503-18(2): Northern Frontier Visitors Centre." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 408-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 503-18(2): Northern Frontier Visitors Centre
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Finance.

Tabled Document 410-18(2): Report Of Special Warrants Issued (January 31 To May 24, 2017)
Tabling of Documents

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents entitled "Inter-Activity Transfer Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2016 to March 31, 2017)" and "Report of Special Warrants Issued (January 31 to May 24, 2017)." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 410-18(2): Report Of Special Warrants Issued (January 31 To May 24, 2017)
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Justice.

Tabled Document 411-18(2): GNWT Response To Committee Report 8-18(2): Report On The Review Of The 2014-2015 And 2015-2016 Annual Reports Of The Information And Privacy Commissioner Of The Northwest Territories
Tabling of Documents

June 2nd, 2017

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker. I wish to table the following document entitled "GNWT Response to CR 8-18(2): Report on the Review of the 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 Annual Reports of the NWT Information and Privacy Commissioner." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 411-18(2): GNWT Response To Committee Report 8-18(2): Report On The Review Of The 2014-2015 And 2015-2016 Annual Reports Of The Information And Privacy Commissioner Of The Northwest Territories
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Tabled Document 412-18(2): Early Childhood Development Action Plan 2017-2020
Tabling of Documents

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I wish to table the following document entitled "Early Childhood Development Action Plan 2017-2020." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 412-18(2): Early Childhood Development Action Plan 2017-2020
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. The Honourable Premier.

Tabled Document 413-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 438-18(2): Empowering Local Governments
Tabling of Documents

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Mr. Speaker. I wish to table the following document entitled "Follow-up Letter for Oral Question 438-18(2): Empowering Local Governments." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 413-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 438-18(2): Empowering Local Governments
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Tabled Document 414-18(2): Follow-Up On Tabled Document 355-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 385-18(2): Changes To Cities, Towns And Villages Act
Tabling of Documents

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you. I wish to table the following document entitled "Follow-up on Tabled Document 355-18(2): Follow-Up Letter for Oral Question 385-18(2): Changes to Cities, Towns and Villages Act." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 414-18(2): Follow-Up On Tabled Document 355-18(2): Follow-Up Letter For Oral Question 385-18(2): Changes To Cities, Towns And Villages Act
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents.

Tabled Document 415-18(2): Summary Of Members' Absences For The Period January 31, 2017 To May 24, 2017
Tabling of Documents

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Pursuant to Section 5 of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act, I wish to table the Summary of Members' Absences for the Period January 31, 2017 to May 24, 2017. Masi. Item 15, notices of motion. Item 16, notices of motion for first reading of bills. Item 17, motions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Motion 34-18(2): Extended Adjournment Of The House To September 19, 2017, Carried
Motions

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Great Slave, that notwithstanding Rule 4, when this House adjourns on June 2, 2017, it shall be adjourned until Tuesday, September 19, 2017;

AND FURTHER that at any time prior to September 19, 2017, if the Speaker is satisfied after consultation with the Executive Council and Members of the Legislative Assembly that the public interest requires that the House should meet at an earlier time during the adjournment, the Speaker may give notice and thereupon the House shall meet at the time stated in such notice, and shall transact its business as it has been duly adjourned to that time. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 34-18(2): Extended Adjournment Of The House To September 19, 2017, Carried
Motions

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Masi. Item 18, first reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018, be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Bill 31 has had first reading. First reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Thebacha, that Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018 be read for the first time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018
First Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Bill 32 has had first reading. Item 19, second reading of bills. Minister of Justice.

Bill 28: Interpretation Act
Second Reading of Bills

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 28, Interpretation Act be read for the second time. This bill sets out fundamental concepts governing the rest of the Northwest Territories' legislation. It:

● sets out key principles of statutory interpretation;

● identifies the elements in a legislative text that are to be considered part of the text;

● provides standard definitions of commonly-used words and expressions;

● provides standard sets of provisions regulating aspects of the operation of all enactments, such as the effective time of commencement, the effect of repeal and amendment, the calculation of time, and the making of regulations; and

● provides standard sets of provisions regulating the powers of corporations, judicial officers, and public officers.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 28: Interpretation Act
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Bill 28 has had second reading. It is now referred to committee. Second reading of bills. Minister of Justice.

Bill 29: Miscellaneous Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017
Second Reading of Bills

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 29, Miscellaneous Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017, be read for the second time. This bill corrects inconsistencies and errors in the statutes of the Northwest Territories. The bill also deals with other matters of a minor, non-controversial and uncomplicated nature in the statutes. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 29: Miscellaneous Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Bill 29 has had second reading. It is now referred to committee. Second reading of bills. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to Section 77(1) of the Legislative Assembly and Executive Council Act, I wish to advise the House that I have a conflict of interest in Bill 30, Health Statutes Law Amendment Act. This bill amends the Public Health Act to clarify that the Commissioner may make regulations respecting cremation and crematoria. Mr. Speaker, my spouse is a funeral planner and, as such, has a private interest in this bill. I will excuse myself from the Chamber during consideration of this matter. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Duly noted. You may be excused while we are dealing with Bill 30. Second reading of bills. Member for Frame Lake.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River North, that Bill 30, Health Statutes Amendment Act (Cremation Services) be read for the second time. Mr. Speaker, this bill amends the Public Health Act to clarify that the Commissioner may make regulations respecting cremation and crematoria. This bill also amends the Vital Statistics Act to define cremation and crematorium and prohibit cremation except by a funeral planner in a crematorium operated by a funeral planner. Merci, Monsieur le President.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill. Member for Frame Lake.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I'm pleased to recommend the Health Statutes Amendment Act, Cremation Services, Bill 30, for the consideration of this Assembly. This is a private Member's bill which proposes amendments to the Public Health Act and to the Vital Statistics Act. All Canadian jurisdictions except the Northwest Territories and Nunavut have legislation for cremation. The private Member's bill does not seek to create new powers with respect to cremation. It does not create any new regulatory structure to govern the performance of cremation. Above all, the private Member's bill does not require cremation. It does provide greater clarity for anyone designated to offer funeral services in the Northwest Territories, enabling service providers to include cremations within the existing system. Specifically, amendments to the Public Health Act will create the ability to make regulations for cremation and crematoriums, amendments to the Vital Statistics Act will define cremation and crematoriums and ensure that only a funeral planner can carry out cremations that are to take place in a crematorium.

I would like to thank all MLAs in this House for the unanimous support of the first reading of this bill and second reading. I believe that is good example of how consensus government can work. I look forward to your continued support in a public review of the bill through the Standing Committee on Social Development. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. To the principle of the bill. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Bill 30: Health Statutes Law Amendment Act (Cremation Services)
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Bill 30 has had its second reading and is now referred to the committee. Second reading of bills. Minister of Finance. For the record, the Member for Yellowknife Centre has returned for the remaining of our procedures. Minister of Finance.

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 31, Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018, be read for the second time. Mr. Speaker, this bill makes supplementary appropriations for operations and expenditures for the government of the Northwest Territories for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Bill 31 has had its second reading. Second reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Thebacha, that Bill 32, Supplementary Appropriations Act (Infrastructure, Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018, be read for the second time. Mr. Speaker, this bill makes supplementary appropriations for infrastructure expenditures for the Government of the Northwest Territories for the 2017-2018 fiscal year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The motion is in order. To the principle of the bill. Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriations Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018
Second Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Bill 32 has had its second reading. Second reading of bills. Item 20, consideration in Committee of the Whole of bills and other matters: Committee Report 11-18(2), Committee Report 12-18(2), Minister's Statement 186-18(2), with the Member for Hay River North in the Chair.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

I now call Committee of the Whole to order. What is the wish of committee? Mr. Testart.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that we rise and report progress. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor to report progress. The motion is in order and non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

I will rise and report progress.

Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

May I have the report, Member for Hay River North?

Report of Committee of the Whole
Report of Committee of the Whole

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Mr. Speaker, your committee would like to report progress. Mr. Speaker, I move that the report of the Committee of the Whole be concurred with. Thank you.

Report of Committee of the Whole
Report of Committee of the Whole

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Is there a seconder? Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

---Carried

Item 22, third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 15: An Act To Amend The Tobacco Tax Act
Third Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Great Slave, that Bill 15, An Act to Amend the Tobacco Tax Act, be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I will request a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion. The question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave, the Member for Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the motion: 18 in favour; zero opposed; zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 15 has had its third reading. Third reading of bills. Minister of Infrastructure.

Bill 26: An Act To Amend The Revolving Funds Act, No. 2
Third Reading of Bills

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, that Bill 26, An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, No. 2, be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I request a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion. The question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

The Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave. the Member for Yellowknife South, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

The Member for Frame Lake.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those abstaining, please stand.

The results of the vote: 16 in favour; one opposed; zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 26 has had its third reading. Third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operation Expenditures) No. 2, 2017-2018
Third Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 31, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018 be read for the third time, and, Mr. Speaker, I would request to record a vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Member requested a recorded vote. Motion is on the floor. To the motion. Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

Mr. McLeod — Inuvik Twin Lakes, Mr. Schumann, Mr. Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Blake, Mr. McNeely, Mr. Vanthuyne, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. O'Reilly, Ms. Green, Mr. Nadli, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. Moses, Ms. Cochrane, Mr. Abernethy, Mr. McLeod — Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the recorded vote are 17 in favour; zero against; zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Bill 31 has had its third reading. Third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act Infrastructure Expenditures No. 2, 2017-2018
Third Reading of Bills

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Thebacha, that Bill 32, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018 be read for the third time, and, Mr. Speaker, I request a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act Infrastructure Expenditures No. 2, 2017-2018
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Member is requesting a recorded vote. Motion is in order. To the motion. Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

Mr. McLeod — Inuvik Twin Lakes, Mr. Schumann, Mr. Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Blake, Mr. McNeely, Mr. Vanthuyne, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. O'Reilly, Ms. Green, Mr. Nadli, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. Moses, Ms. Cochrane, Mr. Abernethy, Mr. McLeod — Yellowknife South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the recorded vote are 17 in favour; zero against; zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Recorded Vote
Third Reading of Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Bill 32 has had its third reading. Third reading of bills. Mr. Clerk, would you please ascertain if Deputy Commissioner Gerald W. Kisoun is prepared to enter the Chamber to assent the bills.

Assent to Bills
Assent to Bills

Deputy Commissioner (Mr. Kisoun)

Good morning. Please be seated. Mr. Speaker and Members of the Legislative Assembly, good afternoon. Quyanainni, qaiqqafi, and shiik kut hai cho. I would like to congratulate all the recipients of various award presentations held here at the legislative assembly building this week. The Order of the Northwest Territories on Tuesday, the Premier's Award, and the Institute of Public Administration of Canada Northwest Territories branch on Wednesday, and the Education Hall of Fame just yesterday.

It is important that the government takes the time to recognize and honour the deserving and hard-working Northwest Territories residents with these awards, and I am glad that I could be here to take part. As we enjoy the summer months, I would like to wish each of you a safe, healthy, and a happy summer as you take your break and enjoy quality time with your families. Please travel safely on the land, on our waters, in the air, and on our highways as you continue working for the betterment of all Northerners.

Please encourage and remind your families, friends, and people in your communities to be safe out on the land and to wear personal floatation devices, or PFDs, when travelling by boat on our waterways. As this sitting comes to a close, I wish the Members of this House good health and happiness as you enjoy the summer and continue to work in your constituencies.

Now, as Deputy Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, I am pleased to assent the following bills:

● Bill 15: An Act to Amend the Tobacco Tax Act

● Bill 16: An Act to Amend the Education Act

● Bill 17: An Act to Amend the Income Tax Act

● Bill 18: An Act to Amend the Health and Social Services Professions Act

● Bill 26: An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, No. 2

● Bill 31: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018

● Bill 32: Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2017-2018

Thank you, hai cho, quyanainni, merci beaucoup, mahsi cho, koana. May God bless you.

Assent to Bills
Assent to Bills

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Please be seated. Members, [English translation not provided.]

Colleagues, I'd just like to say it's been a short session but we've done a lot of work. We completed a lot of assignments that were before us. The summer is fast approaching, and a lot of you will be going back to your region, your community, your riding. I just want to release a message to be safe out there, and the work does not end here. We still have a lot of work ahead of us.

I'd just like to say thank you for your respect, your dignity in this House, and your cooperation. We've done a lot of work in that respect, so I'd just like to say masi. Masi, and keep safe over the summer. Masi cho. Mr. Clerk, orders of the day.

Orders of the Day
Orders of the Day

Clerk Of The House (Mr. Mercer)

Orders of the day for Tuesday, September 19, 2017, at 1:30 p.m.:

1. Prayer

2. Ministers' Statements

3. Members' Statements

4. Reports of Standing and Special Committees

5. Returns to Oral Questions

6. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery

7. Acknowledgements

8. Oral Questions

9. Written Questions

10. Returns to Written Questions

11. Replies to Commissioner's Opening Address

12. Petitions

13. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills

14. Tabling of Documents

15. Notices of Motion

16. Notices of Motion for First Reading of Bills

17. Motions

18. First Reading of Bills

19. Second Reading of Bills

20. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters

● Committee Report 11-18(2), Standing Committee on Rules and Procedures Report on the Review of Standing committee Public Engagement and Transparency

● Committee Report 12-18(2), Standing Committee on Priorities and Planning Report on the Progress Review of the Mandate of the Government of the Northwest Territories, 2016-2019

● Minister's Statement 186-18(2), Update on the A New Day program

21. Report of Committee of the Whole

22. Third Reading of Bills

23. Orders of the Day

Orders of the Day
Orders of the Day

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi, Mr. Clerk. This House stands adjourned until September 19, 2017, at 1:30 p.m.

---ADJOURNMENT

The House adjourned at 12:10 p.m.