This is page numbers 4677 - 4704 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was housing.

Topics

Members Present

Hon. Glen Abernethy, Mr. Beaulieu, Mr. Blake, Hon. Caroline Cochrane, Ms. Green, Hon. Jackson Lafferty, Hon. Bob McLeod, Hon. Robert McLeod, Mr. McNeely, Hon. Alfred Moses, Mr. Nadli, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. O'Reilly, Hon. Wally Schumann, Hon. Louis Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Vanthuyne

The House met at 1:30 p.m.

Prayer
Prayer

Page 4677

Elder Michel Louis Rabesca

[Translation] I would like to say a prayer for the Legislation here. I know that our people are listening to us. [End of translation]

I ask the elders up there to join me when I pray, and I'm going to say a short prayer that we always pray. I have been here in this House many, many times, my friends, and I know the Premier well. I worked with the Premier when I used to work with ENR when I was a Grand Chief, and so I shook a hand with him and I told him I haven't seen him for a long time.

I just want to say that it is good to be back in here. I haven't been here a long time, but don't forget that you are in the eyes of the public. Someone is always watching you all the time. Well, when I pray, I am going to ask the Creator to help every one of you that is here, so that people can work together. That is what we always do. Our elders are always telling us, when we start a meeting, always pray. Things will pan out, work for you. He is there watching us all the time. That is how the elders always talk to us.

I will pray in my own way and you can shut your eyes and ask your Creator to help you as a government, because we need you guys as a government. We need government to govern our country, our people communities out there that need a government, and that's who you are. I will pray for you in my own language.

[Translation] I know that I would like to say a prayer for all the Members and the Regular Members and also the staff, and also the Ministers and the Speaker, and help them to work together and to support one another, and help them to be like one. So I would like to say a prayer now. I would like to pray. [Translation ends]

[Microphone turned off] pray in your own like you guys used to do every morning before you start this meeting, so I will just start my own prayer.

[English translation not provided]

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Thank you, very much.

Prayer
Prayer

Page 4677

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Good afternoon, colleagues. Colleagues, I would like to draw your attention to visitors in the gallery at this time. We have with us two elders from Behchoko. Noel Drybone is here with us and Louis Frankie from Behchoko, two of the respected elders from my community of Behchoko; and also with us Richard Charlo, my CA. Welcome to our Assembly. Masi.

We also have former Grand Chief Joe Rabesca; his son is here with us as well. I would like to thank him for coming, as well. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Minister's Statement 127-18(3): Anti-Poverty Update
Ministers' Statements

Page 4677

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, over the last five years the Government of the Northwest Territories has worked in partnership with people and organizations across the Northwest Territories to better understand and meaningfully address the root causes of poverty in this territory. This outreach supports our mandate commitment to reduce poverty in the Northwest Territories.

In 2013 the GNWT released Building on the Strengths of Northerners: A Strategic Framework Toward the Elimination of Poverty in the Northwest Territories. The development of this Framework was a collaborative effort between our government, Indigenous governments, and the business and non-profit sectors. It is the guiding document for all the work that has been carried out since its release, including the development of a GNWT Action Plan and a multi-stakeholder Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan, as well as annual roundtables to bring all partners together, significant new investments, and innovative new programs and services in communities across the Northwest Territories.

Next week the Sixth Anti-Poverty Roundtable will be held in Hay River, continuing my commitment to host these annual meetings in a different region each year to help partners better understand the unique contexts of poverty throughout the territory.

Mr. Speaker, the roundtable will focus on two critical pieces of work: informing the development of a progress report on the strategic framework toward eliminating poverty since its release five years ago; and working to develop a renewed Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan to guide our work moving forward. Co-creating these documents with involvement from all partners is critical to respecting the collaborative model we have embraced in our poverty reduction efforts.

Mr. Speaker, this commitment to working together is foundational to how we have chosen to address poverty. The Territorial Anti-Poverty Action Plan released in 2015 sets out three principles for action:

  • Respect and equality are essential to anti-poverty work;
  • People are our most important resource; and
  • How we do things is as important as what we do.

Elder Paul Andrew has said, "We didn't know we were poor until the government told us we were, and no one was homeless until someone told us we had to live in a house."

The GNWT has an essential leadership role in addressing poverty, there is no question. We also have a responsibility to carry out the role with humility, especially cultural humility, recognizing that people and communities are best able to drive solutions that are based on their lived experience and understanding and informed by the needs and priorities they articulate for themselves.

Mr. Speaker, poverty is not an Indigenous issue, but Indigenous peoples living in the Northwest Territories continue to be disproportionately impacted by poverty and the negative health and social outcomes associated with it. This is the direct result of colonial policies that have removed people from the land that sustained them, forcing them to adapt to life in settled communities, residential schools, and other institutional environments.

Investments in community health and wellness, mental health and addictions, and opportunities to reconnect to the land and culture have been essential elements of our work to address poverty and address the legacy of colonialism. Addressing the wrongs of the past and helping to create healthy, hopeful futures begins with and will be sustained by the personal development, wellness, and wellbeing of all northern peoples.

Mr. Speaker, one of the tools that we have established as part of our approach to eliminating poverty, in partnership with our communities and partners, is the Anti-Poverty Fund. Since the Anti-Poverty Fund was established in 2014, it is conservatively estimated that 13,000 people have been touched by the programming and supports. Over the years, youth and families have been the most frequent recipients of the program supports. Women, persons with disabilities, people experiencing homelessness, and elders have also benefitted from targeted programming. These efforts are essential to breaking the cycle of poverty for individuals and from generation to generation.

This year, the $1 million Anti-Poverty Fund has been allocated towards more than 40 projects across the Northwest Territories.

Through the fund, food security for children, elders, and those in need is being immediately addressed with meal and snack programs, as well as soup kitchens. It will also support longer-term solutions by investing in initiatives such as community gardens, traditional harvesting programs, and training for small-scale agricultural and poultry production.

Employment and life skills, including traditional and cultural skills, are being supported by programs all over the territory including the Tlicho Government's Dene Warriors Program; the Hay River Committee for Persons with Disabilities' Life-Skills Employment Action Program; and the Deh Cho Friendship Centre's Community Helper Program.

Housing is being addressed through numerous programs, ranging from emergency shelters to rapid rehousing projects, Housing First programs, and an extended stay program to provide extra support for women and children in crisis.

Mr. Speaker, these projects, led by community partners with financial support from our government, are examples that show how we are working together to alleviate the effects of poverty in the short term, while meaningfully addressing the root causes of poverty in the long term.

Poverty is not just an issue of income or economy. It cannot be solved by more jobs, or better-paying jobs, if those opportunities are not accompanied by social policy that respects the dignity of those who are not able to work. Social and technological change everywhere is shifting the nature of work itself, and it is more important than ever that we find ways to invest in the creativity and ingenuity of northern people to create their own opportunities, generate their own employment, and drive employment to community-based economies that are meaningful, sustainable, and grounded in culture and a way of life.

There is much work yet to be done. The GNWT is committed to ongoing leadership in the effort to address poverty in the Northwest Territories, and we are committed to continued collaboration and co-creation in the work that we do and the way that we do it. Today I want to recognize the progress that has been made so far and acknowledge the sustained efforts of all partners, including my colleagues on both sides of this House, Indigenous and community governments, NGOs and community service providers, and the business and philanthropic sectors that support our work. Thank you to all of them for their continued support to advance these programs and initiatives, and I look forward to working with you all in Hay River next week. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 127-18(3): Anti-Poverty Update
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statement. Minister for NWT Housing Corporation.

Minister's Statement 128-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Community Housing Plans
Ministers' Statements

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Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, access to housing continues to be one of the most serious issues for people in the Northwest Territories. Many new players are coming to the table with a new interest in addressing this need, and roles and responsibilities for housing delivery continue to change and evolve. Our government is committed to working with the other governments and housing stakeholders to implement Northern solutions for Northern housing to help address our high cost of living.

The federal government has come back on the scene with a potential long-term commitment under the National Housing Strategy. We are still negotiating with them on the final amount and how to use those resources. Indigenous governments are now taking more of an interest in housing delivery. Although no Indigenous governments have drawn down jurisdiction over housing, there have been offers for engagement and partnerships.

Mr. Speaker, these shifting roles and some new resources offer an opportunity to reshape housing governance, partnership, and planning in the Northwest Territories. To set the stage for more multi-stakeholder involvement in housing projects, the Housing Corporation will be working with individual communities to undertake long-term housing planning in all 33 communities in the Northwest Territories. Housing plans will be developed through a partnership involving the Housing Corporation, the community, and other stakeholders with resources and information to offer.

Mr. Speaker, our focus is to ensure that values and priorities communities have about their housing are reflected in their housing plans. By synthesizing community knowledge and perspectives with housing data and statistics, housing plans will form a comprehensive map to better direct federal and territorial governments, Indigenous governments, community governments, and private industry on future housing investments.

Mr. Speaker, the Housing Corporation has also committed to working with communities to monitor these housing plans on an ongoing basis once they have been developed. The deliverables that communities can expect include a comprehensive community profile, a needs analysis, and a housing plan with goals and outcomes we can use to measure housing changes over time. Some areas housing plans will focus on include housing needs, housing demand, health, education, crime, economic information, available land, population growth, and other factors that support a comprehensive strategic planning document.

Mr. Speaker, the Housing Corporation has undertaken discussions over the past three months with stakeholders in the Government of the Northwest Territories, the federal government, Indigenous governments, and individual communities to start the first round of housing plans for this fiscal year. A community selection process has been established, including readiness criteria that are based on community interest and stakeholder input. Key criteria include a municipal community plan, committed leadership ready to lead the housing plan process, existing advisory or other committees, and potential to hire a local facilitator to engage the community, gather local feedback, and to help plan for a community housing forum.

The Housing Corporation has presented this concept to the Tlicho Government and the Government of the Northwest Territories Housing Working Group. The Housing Corporation will be working with Tlicho representatives towards the development of community housing plans over the next year. My understanding is that Whati will be one of the first communities within the Tlicho region to begin the housing plan process. The Housing Corporation met the week of October 15th with the community's leadership to seek formal approval and agreement to participate.

The Housing Corporation has also presented this concept to the Deline Got'ine Government. The Deline leadership was anxious to proceed, and they will shortly be issuing a formal resolution to participate in this project.

The Inuvialuit Regional Corporation, the Gwich'in Tribal Council, and communities in the Sahtu and the South Slave regions have also expressed interest in starting plans. The Housing Corporation is targeting at least four communities, in addition to Deline and Whati, to complete plans in the next six months.

This is not planning for planning's sake, Mr. Speaker. Once the Government of the Northwest Territories and the federal government have come to an agreement under the National Housing Strategy, there will be further housing investment opportunities in all of our communities. The Housing Corporation will multiply this investment by stacking resources through its Community Housing Support Initiative, which has already seen the development of new housing in partnership with Indigenous governments such as the Salt River First Nations.

Mr. Speaker, we have all heard the saying, "Nothing about us without us." The Housing Corporation's initiative to develop 33 community housing plans meets the spirit of that saying. Investment by all our housing stakeholders will be informed by and grounded in direct feedback from the community residents, ensuring that our resources are used in the most effective way to meet community priorities. Mahsi cho, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 128-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Community Housing Plans
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister for Infrastructure.

Minister's Statement 129-18(3): Energy Initiatives Update
Ministers' Statements

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Wally Schumann Hay River South

The Government of the Northwest Territories has made a mandate commitment to implement the 2030 Energy Strategy. This includes renewable and alternative energy solutions and actions that the Government of the Northwest Territories and our partners will undertake to meet targets for greenhouse gas reductions in heating and power generation as well as our 10-year strategy for investing federal and other funds towards energy projects.

Later today I will table the Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018, which provides an overview of the many energy initiatives completed last fiscal year by various government departments, Crown corporations, and partner agencies that support energy projects, programs, and services for our residents, communities, and Indigenous governments.

Our collaborative approach in these initiatives allows us to make the most of limited resources and to achieve many of our mandate commitments.

Last spring the Government of the Northwest Territories publicly released the 2030 Energy Strategy, along with the Climate Change Strategic Framework and the Northwest Territories Petroleum Resources Strategy. Together, these documents are defining our long-term vision and approach to energy and climate change and will enable the Northwest Territories to transition to a strong, healthy economy that is less dependent on fossil fuels.

The 2017-2018 Energy Initiatives Report supports the strategic objectives outlined in these three documents, which, Mr. Speaker, is a reassurance that we are on the right path.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to highlight some of the noteworthy accomplishments in the Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018, and begin by sharing some of the projects that we advanced in the Government of the Northwest Territories' mandate commitment to continue to develop and advance initiatives to displace diesel generation in the Northwest Territories, including biomass energy projects.

The Government of the Northwest Territories installed a biomass boiler at Ecole Allain St-Cyr School, which I toured earlier today. This system will meet nearly 100 percent of the heating needs of the school. The system will save 115,000 litres of diesel, or about $130,000, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 306 tonnes per year. The Government of the Northwest Territories also installed a 950-kilowatt biomass boiler at East Three School in Inuvik, making that school the first GNWT asset in the Beaufort-Delta to install biomass heating. This system will offset 270,000 litres of propane or the equivalent of 410 tonnes of carbon dioxide. It will also provide an annual savings of close to $370,000.

Last year, we also marked the 10th anniversary of the Government of the Northwest Territories' Capital Asset Retrofit Fund, also known as CARF. As Members know, this program uses money saved through energy efficiency improvements to government buildings to further fund improvements. Over the last decade, CARF-supported initiatives that have effectively reduced greenhouse gas emissions from the Government of the Northwest Territories assets by over 10,000 tonnes annually and have displaced the equivalent of 27 million litres of diesel fuel since the program's inception, representing a nearly 24 percent reduction in annual emissions.

Mr. Speaker, our government is also fulfilling our mandate commitment to displace diesel generation through wind energy projects, including the proposed Inuvik High Point Wind Project, and assessing the feasibility of wind energy projects in other communities or regions.

The Government of the Northwest Territories is undertaking wind monitoring in Sachs Harbour to better understand wind resource potential in the High Arctic. We are also undertaking wind monitoring and data collection in Norman Wells, and collecting water flow information that could lead to a community-scale hydro project in partnership with the community of Gameti.

In 2017-2018, work continued on the Inuvik Wind Project as part of the 2030 Energy Strategy targeted to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from diesel electricity by 25 percent by the year 2030. To support this project, the Government of the Northwest Territories has undertaken community outreach, including a Traditional Knowledge and Land Use Workshop in Inuvik with Gwich'in and Inuvialuit elders, land users, and youth.

Mr. Speaker, looking forward, other strategic energy initiatives are taking place. For the first time, we have secured a long-term commitment from our federal partners to invest in energy infrastructure projects and incentive programs that are tailored to advance our policy objectives and deliver on mandate commitments.

This past March, the federal government committed to fund the Government of the Northwest Territories with more than $570 million over the next 10 years under the Investing in Canada Plan. Approximately $350 million of that commitment will support the 2030 Energy Strategy and Energy Action Plan. Notable projects for which the Government of the Northwest Territories submitted applications under the agreement include the mega-size wind turbine project in Inuvik, overhauls to the aging Snare hydro system. We look forward to providing Members with further updates on these projects in the very near future.

Earlier this month, we also signed a $23 million funding agreement as part of the federal Low Carbon Economy Leadership Fund. Part of this funding is being used to increase the Arctic Energy Alliance funding by approximately $9 million over four years.

Remaining funds will be used to support the new government Greenhouse Gas Grant Program, which was announced earlier this month and will provide up to $1.8 million in grants per year for community governments to undertake greenhouse gas reduction projects.

Mr. Speaker, the Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018 is an excellent reference for those interested in learning how the Government of the Northwest Territories has linked broad policy objectives to community projects and to programs across the Northwest Territories over the last year and how it is helping the 18th Legislative Assembly fulfill mandate commitments.

Looking forward, we are focused on leveraging the significant federal investment that we have secured to advance and fulfill our mandate commitments, reducing our infrastructure gap, and ultimately improving the sustainability of our communities. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 129-18(3): Energy Initiatives Update
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Minister's Statement 130-18(3): Municipal Government Elections
Ministers' Statements

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Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, six community governments in the Northwest Territories had an election on October 15, 2018. These elections took place for all of our communities with city, town, or village status, including the city of Yellowknife; the towns of Hay River, Fort Smith, Norman Wells, and Inuvik; and the village of Fort Simpson.

There were 87 candidates in total, vying for 52 available seats. The large number of candidates shows that there was keen interest in the local level of government and that individuals want to serve as leaders and decision-makers for their community.

Mr. Speaker, I am happy to report that our territory continues to benefit from gender parity at the local government level, with four of the six mayor positions taken by female candidates. In total, 26 percent of the total 87 candidates for municipal office were female, and 78 percent of those candidates were successful in their bid for election.

The voter turnout rate was between 34 percent and 78 percent across the Northwest Territories. The lowest turnout rates were in communities where either the mayor or council was acclaimed.

Seventeen percent of candidates overall were acclaimed, with the mayor of Hay River and eight councillor seats for the town of Inuvik not requiring a vote. Overall, the mayor position was well contested, with two to four candidates running for mayor in each of Yellowknife, Inuvik, Fort Smith, Norman Wells, and Fort Simpson.

Local elections remain important to community residents. Being an elected official is one of the best ways that an individual can support their community in providing a safe, sustainable, and healthy environment for their residents. Congratulations to all who were elected on October 15, 2018, especially to the mayors. I look forward to working closely with Mayor Natasha Kulikowski in Inuvik, Mayor Frank Pope in Norman Wells, Mayor Sean Whelly in Fort Simpson, Mayor Rebecca Alty in Yellowknife, Mayor Kandis Jameson in Hay River, and Mayor Lynn Napier-Buckley in Fort Smith.

Many thanks to all the candidates who ran in the six communities, whether they were successful or not. People's willingness to serve is what makes democracy work, especially at the community level.

I would also like to thank the staff and volunteers who not only led the election process on behalf of the municipalities, but also those who supported candidates with their campaigns. It takes a significant effort by many people to facilitate this process behind the scenes so that residents can exercise their right to vote in elections.

Mr. Speaker, there will be an election for nine hamlet community governments on December 10, 2018. During this election, there will be 35 positions to be filled. This will be an opportunity for aspiring candidates in those communities to run and for residents to choose their leadership and determine the future direction of their community. I encourage all qualified residents to put their names forward and, especially, to get out and vote. Mahsi cho, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 130-18(3): Municipal Government Elections
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Item 3, Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Air Tindi 30th Anniversary
Members' Statements

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Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today I would like to speak about a good-news success story stemming from the riding of Yellowknife North. It's the story of a good idea, hard work, and community partnerships that grew into a northern legend and thriving business.

Mr. Speaker, today is the 30th anniversary of the establishment of Air Tindi. On November 1, 1988 Peter and Alex Arychuk and their wives Teri and Sheila, along with eight employees and three aircraft, opened their new business. They loved aviation, loved the people of the North, and brought confidence and a strong work ethic to their new airline. They started with seasonal tourism flights, wildlife surveys, and mining exploration, and grew from there.

Over time they earned loyalty and friendships among customers and communities by building a tradition of excellence, reliability, service, and safety. Starting in 1991 they have forged a total of six Aboriginal joint ventures. Continuously since 1993 Air Tindi has provided medevac services across the NWT. The diamond rush of the early 1990s boosted the airline even further, leading to growth in business and the acquisition of more-capable aircraft, like the Dash 7.

Today Air Tindi employs 200 people flying 18 aircraft. It provides vital daily connections between five communities and the capital. Its medevac crew is ready to be in the air anywhere in the NWT within 45 minutes of getting a call. In 2017 they flew over 1,200 medevac missions.

Air Tindi flies specialty charter missions of almost every description. It carried the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge to Blachford Lake Lodge, dog teams to the Arctic Winter Games, and a load of piglets to Gameti for the community's local agricultural project.

Mr. Speaker, like many northern businesses Air Tindi has benefitted from a focus on safety and best practices. This past year it achieved 1 million hours and three full years' operation without a lost-time injury.

The airline also grows its own northern workforce. About 30 apprentices or trainees are at Air Tindi at any given time, learning to be pilots or mechanical engineers.

Mr. Speaker, Air Tindi is truly a northern success story. After 30 years it continues to play a central role in transportation services in the NWT, providing a vital service and connecting northern communities and peoples.

Colleagues, please join me in congratulating Air Tindi on its 30th anniversary in business. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Air Tindi 30th Anniversary
Members' Statements

Page 4682

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Sahtu.

Infrastructure Projects in the Sahtu
Members' Statements

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, we conclude our capital planning session.

Mr. Speaker, I recall growing up in the community of Colville Lake, and being mindful on the proposed new school facility gives me pleasure.

Mr. Speaker, in those early days we did not have a school in the community and therefore attended the Inuvik residential school.

Mr. Speaker, the Colville Lake First Nations built their own facility. Now, Mr. Speaker, the community children will soon be able to attend classes in a community-participation designed facility and no longer have to whisper from behind panels made from bookshelves.

Mr. Speaker, the community of Tulita held their first joint meeting with Infrastructure on their design input involvement to their community health centre, a true partnership approach by the Departments of Health and Social Services and Infrastructure.

Both buildings, Mr. Speaker, will contribute to building and strengthening community-based education and healthcare.

Mr. Speaker, advancing forward during 2019, I look forward to the community benefits by construction.

Mr. Speaker, in closing, I would like to extend best wishes to all Members for the remainder of 2018. Mahsi.

Infrastructure Projects in the Sahtu
Members' Statements

Page 4682

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Remembrance Day
Members' Statements

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Speaker, it has been nearly 100 years since the end of the First World War. Around the world, it is known as Armistice Day, Memorial Day, National Independence Day in Poland, and in the Commonwealth as Remembrance Day.

November 11th is the day for us to solemnly reflect upon the sacrifices made by those who preceded us, making a decision that many of us will hopefully never have to. Remembrance Day is a chance for us to show thanks to those who are to this day buried in lands not of their birth and far from their homes and families. It is an opportunity to share with those who were fortunate enough to have returned our thanks and reverence, while remembering all those who were left behind.

Remembrance Day is not about the glorification of armed conflict. Rather, it is an opportunity for us to show reverence and respect to our elders who have made a decision harder than many of us will ever have to face; to go off beyond the horizon to defend that which they hold dear, to leave behind compatriots and to return to a home having experience they can share with oh so few. Many returning veterans are burdened with traumas which few in the general public fully comprehend. Veterans should rightly be proud of their experience and achievements, and we in the public should not be allowed to have them forgotten.

Mr. Speaker, I want to take this moment to ask all Members in this House, as well as Northerners, to take a moment to reflect, however they best see fit, upon the sacrifices of veterans past, present, and future. We must never cease to show our gratitude to our service men and women, for even today these words still ring true: "Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Remembrance Day
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Members' Statements

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Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, [Translation] they are talking about the carbon tax today, so I am going to ask the Minister: the tanks that are getting delivered into the communities, we are talking about it. They are saying that it was not to be taxed the way they are working. I don't understand exactly what is going on. The people who deliver the fuel within a community or the boats that are delivering it, maybe they are the ones who are paying the tax. The heating fuel is not supposed to be taxed for the people that are hunting and living on the land. [Translation ends]

[Microphone not on] ... on a couple of questions my constituents have over carbon tax. I know that some of the fuels will be exempt. I will be asking the Minister of Finance about what fuels will be exempt. My understanding is maybe fuels that are needed to travel, but I'm not sure if that includes travelling on the land for individuals to go out hunting for the elders in the community, or if it is only specific to fuels that are used for boats and ships or airplanes, for people who have to travel.

In at least one of my communities, we have no highway. Then, in three of the communities that I represent, there are highways, and people use their vehicles to hunt. I don't know if that means that there will be an exemption on the gas that they purchase in order to go hunting.

[Translation] And the people who are travelling, going out on the land to heal themselves, either by boat or Skidoo, going to some of the cultural activities out on the land, and the gas that is being used for those trips in the Skidoos. I don't understand if it's being taxed or not, too, so I'm going to ask the Minister of Finance today. Thank you very much. [Translation ends]

Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Kole Crook Fiddle Association
Members' Statements

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Fiddle music came to the NWT with the voyageurs and has been ingrained in northern culture and music since the first traders. Angus Beaulieu, Stanley Lafferty, and Colin Adjun are some of the best known, but there are many other fine northern fiddlers. Kole Crook represented the next generation.

Kole was a much-loved young fiddler known for his gentlemanly ways and selflessness and generosity of spirit. He was a deeply spiritual man, who lived his Christian faith by sharing himself, his money, and means with whoever might need it. He spent much time with the elders, observing their wisdom and teachings.

Kole travelled from community to community, introducing children to the joy of fiddling and bringing the benefits of music to the youth of his communities. He led by example. With youth, Kole always had time to teach children on how to fiddle, keeping the music tradition alive. With elders, Kole helped them with their chores, listening to their stories, and maintained traditional values. All generations and ages were brought together through music he played.

Kole's death on his way to a New Year's event in Tulita was a tragic loss, felt by all those who knew him, met him, or heard his music. Kole passed on his joyful music playing generous spirit and sharing of musical tradition lived on through the Kole Crook Fiddle Association. They continue to change young people's lives forever through the music.

Since 2003, the association has been actively continuing the work Kole did in so many of the communities. Youth and elders connecting in performance with the youth at the elder care centres is always a magical experience.

Communities, concerts for the whole families, toe tapping, jigging, and laughing together. The annual January jamboree in Fort Simpson brings nearly 100 fiddlers together for a fun-filled weekend of fiddling and dancing.

The association has donated fiddles and taught many NWT communities over the years. They have established fiddle programs in 17 communities. The association has been moving forward on a wing and a prayer. A friend's kitchen became a fiddler's repair shop. The association's president kept a room in her home for teachers and lent out a car for teaching tourists. Angus and Dorothy Beaulieu donated accommodations. Buffalo Air donated free flights for the association's teachers.

There has been Arts Council and MACA support for the Kole Crook Fiddle Association, but much more each could be done with the help of this Assembly to support the organization fully. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Kole Crook Fiddle Association
Members' Statements

Page 4683

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Trapping Season in the Beaufort Delta
Members' Statements

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today is the opening season in the Beaufort Delta for trapping. Many people are very excited to go out on the land and continue our traditional way of life. Please be safe as our warmer temperatures and swift water can make the ice unsafe on the rivers, creeks, and rivers as you begin to open up your trap lines and start setting traps.

Mr. Speaker, it is pretty neat to see that my constituents continue to this day to bring their children with them and teach them our traditional way of life. Also, Mr. Speaker, we have some elders who are in their 70s and 80s who are still trapping to this day. They are true role models to our younger generation. They are teaching our next generation that, with true trapping, you can not only provide for your family, but also live a healthy way of life. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Trapping Season in the Beaufort Delta
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Carbon Pricing
Members' Statements

Page 4684

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the issue of carbon pricing and how to encourage reduced use of fossil fuels takes up a lot of space in our national debate and, of course, it's a popular topic in this House, as well. These are vital issues for many reasons. I would like to give my assessment of where we are at in the NWT and where we need to go.

Cabinet announced details in July of a scheme that would meet the federal requirements of a carbon tax. Cabinet said its made-in-the-NWT framework takes into account our cost of living by establishing a system of immediate tax exemptions and cost of living rebates. To offset increased costs, the GNWT created a cost of living offset to refund the tax to individuals and families.

I had hoped for a more comprehensive package of measures, including dramatic increases in rebates and incentives to improve the energy efficiency of homes and buildings. Increases to energy alliance programs have come thanks to new federal dollars. I applaud the GNWT's announcement this week of an additional $1.8 million under the new Government Greenhouse Gas Grant Program. That is progress, but we need much more ambitious supports.

I am also convinced industry is willing to meet the low carbon challenge. The Canadian Mining Association is on the record in support of "a broad-based carbon price that is applicable to all sectors of the Canadian economy." One of our mines took action more than a decade ago with a big investment in wind power generation because this makes economic sense. I believe the industry is willing to do more to meet shareholder demands that they take action on greenhouse gas emissions. As to the notion that carbon pricing is a job killer and stunts economic growth, the facts soundly refute this misconception.

When I lend an ear to this issue in the NWT, I am not hearing the public outcry about a carbon tax. I believe our residents have the learned and factual warnings of the extraordinary hardships facing our planet as a result of climate change, and they are willing to act. What is needed is inspirational leadership, not fearful hesitancy. For the sake of our children's future, we must keep our international promises and work towards a lower carbon future. I will be asking our government how they can better support our response to climate change. Mahsi.

Carbon Pricing
Members' Statements

Page 4684

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Hay River North.

Hay River Town Council Elects
Members' Statements

Page 4684

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, on Tuesday, November 6th, Hay River's new town council will be sworn in. While there will be some familiar faces, six of the nine members are newly elected. That means we will be saying goodbye to quite a few people, and I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to Donna Lee Jungkind, Vince McKay, Jason Coakwell, Roger Candow, and Mike Mahar for their service over the past three years.

I especially have to thank our outgoing mayor, Brad Mapes, who has always been willing to work closely with me during my time as MLA so we could advance the interests of our community. I look forward to continuing this good working relationship with mayor-elect, Kandis Jameson, who I would like to congratulate on her election by acclamation.

Congratulations, as well, to returning councillors, Steve Anderson and Keith Dohey, and newly elected councillors, Robert Bouchard, Jeff Groenewegen, Emily Chambers, Linda Duford, Joe Melanson, and Brian Willows. They will face many challenging issues in the coming years, including the power franchise decision, which will have ramifications for the entire territory; the economic growth that will be associated with Pine Point Mines, the pellet mill, the long-term care unit, and all the associated spin-offs; as well as our future population growth and development issues.

I know they are up to the challenge, and I look forward to working with them. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Passing of Agnes Sutherland
Members' Statements

Page 4685

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, people in Fort Smith and throughout the Northwest Territories were saddened to hear of the passing in St. Albert, Alberta, of Agnes Sutherland, in August of this year at the age of 92.

Sister Agnes Sutherland was born in Fort Chipewyan, Alberta, in 1926 and joined the Grey Nuns in 1943, pronouncing her vows in 1946. She was a teacher in St. Albert, St. Paul, Fort McMurray, and Fort Smith, where she lived for many years. She also worked as a religious education specialist and found time to write several books.

She was an advocate for women seeking shelter when fleeing abusive relationships and was a driving force in the establishment of a shelter in Fort Smith which bears her name, Sutherland House. She was also a strong advocate for seniors and those with disabilities. She leaves many friends and admirers.

Mr. Speaker, a long life well lived. Thank you.

Passing of Agnes Sutherland
Members' Statements

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Our condolences to the family members and also to the community, as well. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Earlier today in the House, we acknowledged the 30-year anniversary of Air Tindi. Today, we have with us in the House and I want to recognize them: President Al Martin; we have HR Manager Belinda Beck; and we have Vice-President Trevor Weaver from Air Tindi. Welcome and thank you for being here.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to recognize my wife of 39 years, Judy McLeod, who provided me a lot of good advice, and she always reminds me to be nice in the Assembly. Sometimes, I listen. Sometimes, I don't. Always glad to have you in the gallery. Thank you. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Inuvik Boot Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to welcome Judy, as well, a constituent of Inuvik Boot Lake. Always good to see you here in the proceedings and supporting and giving good advice to our Member representing Inuvik Twin Lakes. Mahsi.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, it is my pleasure today to introduce Mr. Trevin Yakeleya. He is a Page from the Yellowknife Centre constituency. I would like to take this opportunity to thank him for his service to the House, and to all the Pages who have been active in this sitting. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife South.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am pleased to recognize a Page from Yellowknife South, Rivka Peters, and also all the Pages who have been here for the past four weeks. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Thebacha.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I am pleased to recognize two Pages from Fort Smith, Finnlay Rutherford-Simon and Madelynn Minute. I would like to thank all of the Pages for their work with us. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Sahtu.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like, on our last day, to thank the Pages here who are helping us, including Mackenzie Menacho and Abigail Sewi from Deline, and watching the proceedings here also, the staff behind the glasses here, translation, and Indio, our technician. Mahsi.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nahendeh.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would to also like to recognize your CA, Richard Charlo. We called him Little Richie back when. Welcome to the Assembly. Thank you for doing a great job for the Minister. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to recognize somebody in the gallery. He is not a constituent of the riding, but I think he has been a great voice for the Northwest Territories for many, many years, a great voice for CBC, Mr. Randy Henderson.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4685

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4686

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Mr. Speaker, thank you for your indulgence. I would be remiss if I didn't acknowledge Yellowknife North resident and the architect of our fine building, Mr. Gino Pin. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4686

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Masi. Item 6, acknowledgments. Item 7, oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

November 1st, 2018

Page 4686

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Minister of Finance on the carbon tax. I know that fuels are exempted from the carbon tax here in the Northwest Territories. I would like to ask the Minister for the people back home, for the constituency, if you can tell us exactly which fuels are exempted from carbon tax? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Finance.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, there was a lot of work done with Ottawa on the carbon pricing and the effect that it was going to have on the Northwest Territories. They have agreed with us that aviation fuel should be exempt, and I believe heating fuel as well will be exempt at the pump. Those are the two. I was just checking on the gasoline to see if there was an exemption there. Those are the two that we have for now. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

I would like to ask the Minister if there will be tax rebates. I notice that all of the jurisdictions that didn't do their own carbon tax system, the federal carbon tax system was imposed upon them, but there were tax exemptions. I want to ask the Minister: will there be tax exemptions for the people of the territories, as well?

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Gasoline will not be exempted at the pump, but I think they would have to file for that. As far as the rebates go, recognizing the cost of the carbon pricing on people in the Northwest Territories, that's one of the things we heard the most about as we were touring the Northwest Territories with that particular issue. There will be rebates provided to residents of the Northwest Territories using the made-in-the-North approach to carbon pricing. Had we used a federal backstop, and I think I provided a table at one time; I am in the process of putting that information together. I want to table that document. It is available online on our finance website, but I want to table that document so people in the territories know what it would cost us had we used the federal backstop, not the one that we proposed to the federal government, and good on them for accepting our approach to carbon pricing.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

I would like to thank the Minister for correcting me. I was calling it tax exemptions, but I meant tax rebates. Thank you. On the fuels that are exempted like heating fuels and aviation fuel, at some point, I think both of those fuels will be produced in the south and hauled. I want to ask the Minister if the individuals who are hauling heating fuels, like a trucking company, or as we buy the fuels off the rack, and then the transportation costs of that, I would like to ask the Minister if carbon tax is imposed upon the people who are actually hauling the fuel to the Northwest Territories?

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

One of the challenges that we face in the Northwest Territories, and we made it known to Ottawa, was a lot of the product that we have coming to the territories has to be shipped into the Northwest Territories. We don't produce a lot of our own product, and they understood that. My understanding is that those products that are coming in, they would have to pay carbon tax on that. That is one of the reasons, when we came up with our made-in-the-NWT approach, we thought it would be easier for our residents if we rebated the heating fuel and at the pumps, as well as the aviation fuel.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I'd like to ask the Minister if the government would look at subsidies based on the remoteness of the communities, or maybe based on income, or maybe based on the fact that individuals are hunting for elders and so on, if there would be any subsidies at all involved in this whole carbon tax scheme? Thank you.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

As Members are aware, this Legislative Assembly of the Government of the Northwest Territories does provide a lot of subsidies across the NWT. A couple of things that the Member mentioned on hunting and trapping through the different programs that are offered through ENR, in the Genuine Fur Valley, the Grub Stake Program, they do get some funding through that. As far as coming up with another subsidy, that's not on the table at the moment. As I said again, there are a number of subsidies that are provided through the government, and we believe that one of the subsidies might be able to capture the issue that the Member is speaking of. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 486-18(3): Carbon Tax Impacts on Traditional Economies
Oral Questions

Page 4686

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions will be for the Minister responsible for Housing. The corporation has this great program called HELP, and it helps people get into their homes and become homeowners, and I think it's a great program. However, recently I've been advised that there were four applicants for four units in the community of Fort Simpson. Two candidates were very successful and very happy to hear that; however, one of the other two were competing now for only one unit because they turned in one of the HELP units into the market house renting. Can the Minister explain why they changed one of the HELP units into a market rent unit? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the NWT Housing Corporation.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. First of all, it would be inappropriate for me to discuss any specific application and information on our residents here, but if there is no program demand for a particular unit and it does remain vacant, the NWT Housing Corporation can re-profile a HELP unit into a market unit or vice versa. You can't turn a market unit into a HELP unit, but it would be inappropriate for me to discuss any specifics on any kind of application information. Like I said, if there is no program demand, then, we are able to re-profile those units. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I wasn't asking about applicants. I am just saying that I know that there were four applicants, four HELP units. Again, what was the rationale to reduce that one, take one of those HELP units to a market unit, because there are two applicants looking for these types of units?

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

As I mentioned earlier, units are not profiled to another program unless it is confirmed that there is no demand for the unit under the original program, and that was the case.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

If there are four applicants, there are four HELP units, I would assume there was a need. Unfortunately, I guess the corporation has a different matrix of deciding what needs are. It is my understanding that the Housing Corporation is bringing in two more units during the winter months. Are these units going to be HELP units or market rent units?

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

The Member is correct. We are bringing two market rental duplexes, which equates to four units. These should be ready for occupancy hopefully by March of 2019.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That's great news, and I thank the Minister for providing that here today. With these new units coming into place, will that unit they changed from HELP to market be turned back to a HELP unit so residents can have that opportunity to get into this program? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

The introduction of more HELP units into any community across the Northwest Territories is only considered if there is a demand for the program. Obviously NWT Housing Corporation would like to work with residents to get into home ownership or work with them to get into housing units, but the same is for market units, you know. We have nurses, we have teachers out there who need units to stay in, and we need to find balance. The introduction of any HELP units across the NWT would be considered if there was a demand for the program. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 487-18(3): Home Ownership Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4687

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4687

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, one of my constituents is a trapper who benefits from the ENR's Prime Fur Bonus program, and over the last season he had substantial delays in receiving his payment, thousands of dollars held up for inexplicable reasons. I brought this concern to the Minister of ENR and it has since been resolved, but I am wondering if he can speak publicly to the issue which is affecting the prompt payment of trappers who rely on this extra income. Thank you.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4687

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would be happy to stand here and promote one of the best programs that the government offers across the Northwest Territories. As the Member from the Mackenzie Delta said, it is November 1st today, trapping season, and a lot of people are able to access many of the programs through the Grubstake Program and prepare themselves from an upcoming trapping season. They get further benefits when they bring their fur in. They do get an advance on fur that they bring. They send the fur out to the markets, and then depending on how quickly the sale is is how quickly we can get the money back to them. I was glad we were able to resolve the Member's constituent's issue. It is a very successful program, and I am going on a little too long, so I am going to stop there, Mr. Speaker.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

I agree with the Minister. It's a great program, but it's really important that we pay our trappers on time, and I know that with my constituent in particular there was a new financial system that was put in place that was the subject of these delays, and I know at the time that I inquired with this they were still, the department was still, working out the kinks. I don't want a Phoenix pay system in the NWT sort of problem, and I do not think any of our trappers do, either, so can the Minister assure this House that this new financial system is working as intended and after this season there will be no more delays in payments?

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, the fur harvest management system might be the one the Member is referring to. We are getting the kinks out of that. Again I would have to investigate a little further, but I do know that sometimes the delay in getting the money back to the trappers is from the actual fur sale itself. I think in this particular case the way that it was going through the system might have been part of the reason for the delay, and I can assure the Member and all trappers out there, and I know a lot of them personally, that this will not be happening again.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Has the Minister's department reached out to all of these trappers who were delayed in getting paid? Has the Minister's department reached out and let them know what the issues are and can reassure them personally that the problem will not happen again?

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Mr. Speaker, my understanding, as far as I know we have had the one concern, and, if there are others, I will follow up and let them know that this should not happen again once we get all of the kinks ironed out of the system. Again, the Member agrees with me, this is a fantastic program. We actually had a veteran trapper up in the delta when we were up there with the meeting, the economic symposium. We had them actually come up to the Minister of ITI and myself, complementing the government on the success of that program with the Grubstake Program and everything else and how successful it's been and how many trappers have actually taken advantage of this program.

Question 488-18(3): Prime Fur Bonus Program
Oral Questions

Page 4688

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment. I referred to the announcement this week of an additional $1.8 million over four years under the new government Greenhouse Gas Grant program, and I note that this program is aimed at government's reductions of greenhouse gas outputs from non-renewable energy sources. My question for the Minister is: can he tell me why a decision was made to introduce programming that in the end perpetuates fossil fuel use rather than devoting more substantial funds to these governments' introduction of fully renewable energy systems? Thank you.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. When we developed the 2030 Energy Strategy we had to go out and have a look at everything and talk to everybody and have consultation about what residents felt that was important to them across all links of government and people in the Northwest Territories, and this was one of the programs in many that we are introducing in the 2030 Energy Strategy that needed to be looked at. It was felt that this needed to be funded in this manner, so it's one of the decisions that came out of that process.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thanks to the Minister for that. The question that I have is how the Minister balances the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions versus replacing fossil fuel use altogether. How is that balance determined?

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Wally Schumann Hay River South

When we went out and did our consultation it was clearly stated that we need to have a secure, safe, reliable source of energy. Technology is not there to totally switch to totally renewables for us and particularly because we have such a vast territory that we have to have fuel in to some of these smaller communities, such as Sachs Harbour, Ulukhaktok, and Paulatuk, which is a challenging environment. That is why we are doing our wind studies up in that type of environment, to see if it's feasible. So we have to balance this up. Technology is not there to totally get us off of fossil fuels and into renewables.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4688

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Under the GNWT's carbon pricing scheme the large industrial producers of greenhouse gas will get 75 percent of their taxes rebated; 25 percent goes into a special fund. I truly believe that industry would take more aggressive action on reducing its greenhouse gas emissions and replacing fossil fuel if they were asked. So in developing this element of the plan what evaluation was made of how less rebate and more project support would influence industry to make these changes?

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Wally Schumann Hay River South

We all know that the large industry emission people in the Northwest Territories are the mining industry. These people are already located in a situation where they are off the road system, they are off hydro. They have to make their most efficient operation they possibly can to keep their costs down. This fund we set up as 75/25 is going to be able to help them come up with new types of approaches to be able to get them off of fossil fuels, and it's a balanced approach that, like I have said, we have had to do across the Northwest Territories. The mining industry is a big part of helping us try to come to some type of solution, but they are trying to mitigate their costs in what they are doing presently.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4689

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the Minister for that. Finally I note that recently announced spending under the federal-territorial low carbon leadership fund provides support for carbon sequestration in forestry. This would hardly seem to me to be a priority against the more pressing needs of, say, aggressively improving the energy efficiency of government housing stock, so can the Minister explain why the emphasis was put, again it's the balance thing, but on sequestration rather than energy improvements to public housing?

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Wally Schumann Hay River South

The Low-Carbon Economy Leadership Fund does have money in there for helping to gain efficiency in public housing. There is a significant amount in there. Again we have had to take a balanced approach to this whole aspect of how we are going to lower greenhouse gas emissions in the Northwest Territories, but the other side of it is that on these applications there are certain criteria that we have to fulfill to meet federal funding and, to be able to access some of this money, we have had to spread it around and try to help all parts of the economy in the Northwest Territories. This is one of the ones that has come forward, and we are working with ENR on that to move the carbon sequestration forward for reforestation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 489-18(3): Reduction of Non-Renewable Energy
Oral Questions

Page 4689

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, when I was asking the Minister responsible for Housing, he said that the corporation demand, he was talking about the demand and need of the HELP units in the communities. Can the Minister provide what the corporation definition is of "demand" for HELP units in the communities? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4689

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. When we look at the demand in our communities, we look at what the priorities are of the region. As I mentioned, over this session one of the initiatives that we are taking on as the Housing Corporation in working with the communities, as you heard in my Minister's statement earlier, is we are going to be developing these community housing plans and we are going to be working with leadership, we are going to be working with stakeholders to identify these.

In the situation and the questions that the Member has asked earlier, you know, we had to make some changes within the community to meet some of the market units. As you know, as all Members here know, there are low-market units for teachers, for nurses, for professionals to have a place to stay and provide the services that our residents need in the Northwest Territories. The housing plans are going to address that. When we work with our communities we are going to develop a comprehensive strategic planning document that's going to say whether or not homelessness is the priority, seniors are the priority, singles' units, or market units, and we are going to work with every community across the Northwest Territories. We are going to find northern solutions for our northern housing needs.

One other program that I just want to put out there, Mr. Speaker, is our community housing support initiative. We are working very well with communities to address the housing needs that they have, and it's a really good program, and I encourage all Members to take a look into it. We are developing some really good programs, and we are developing some very strong partnerships, so I would ask the Member to reach out to us and maybe have the leadership have a discussion with our staff to see how we can address some of the concerns that the Member does have in addressing whether it's a HELP unit or a market unit or public housing units in the community.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4689

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. So he is talking about community housing plans and that, and we are going to do six in the next year coming up, so can he tell me when Fort Simpson is going to be on that list? Because, if we are going to be waiting six, 12, 14, two years from now, I would like to know that so the community can know that. Because right now the Housing Corporation is relying on these community housing plans, so can the Minister advise us when Fort Simpson will be on that list?

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

At this moment in time I do not have a timeline for when Fort Simpson will get on that list. We have put it out there. As I mentioned in my statement, we have Indigenous governments that are seeking interest into developing these community housing plans. The community of Whati for one is a community that we are going to start with. This is new. This is new to government. It's new to the NWT Housing Corporation. As we start to develop it, and I have said this time and time again during the session, once we get a housing plan up and running it might show us a template for similar communities across the Northwest Territories. So I think that, as we move forward and we start developing these housing plans throughout the Northwest Territories, hopefully it will steamroll so that all communities will eventually get on board and we will develop some community housing plans for all of our communities in the Northwest Territories.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I have heard the words "may," "hope," "could be the template." So, if it isn't the template, what are these communities supposed to be doing in the short term? Because right now we are looking at HELP units being turned into market units, and we are bringing in market units into the community, and I also know some private industries are bringing market units in there. So what are the communities supposed to do if they are not fitting the model, the template, that they are working for?

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

The NWT Housing Corporation has gone through a significant change during the 17th and the 18th Legislative Assemblies. We have developed some great programs that are helping communities, that are helping families, and we are going to continue to promote those programs. I encourage communities, I encourage Members, I encourage residents to go and speak to their local housing office. Also go and speak with the regional district offices on low those programs can help and benefit a community. We have a lot of programs that are very successful.

Like I mentioned, we have gone through a change over the last two governments. In terms of private industry, we are more than open to work with private industry to address the housing needs in some of our communities and regional centres, and we will continue to promote that. Partnership with the NWT Housing Corporation is significant, and we pride ourselves on that. We have shown success with Indigenous governments. We have shown success with private industry. The Inuvialuit Corporation is a really good benchmark that we can look at as a standard. So, in the meantime, I think we have done a lot in the last two governments to address the housing needs across the Northwest Territories. We will continue to do that. I encourage the Member and leadership in the Nahendeh riding to reach out to our district office. If not, we can make sure our district office reaches out to leadership.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Well, I am stumped for words here because, first of all, I have never, ever said anything bad about the district office. They have done a great job. They are promoting the information out there. They are getting there, but what I am seeing is that the Housing Corporation has changed a HELP unit to market rental unit, we are bringing in more market rental units, and people are still looking for HELP units. Is this government taking away the HELP units, then? Is this no longer going to be an option for people in the future?

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Just for the record, I did not say the Member had said anything bad about our regional district offices, so I do not know where he got that from. Secondly, we continue to promote our programs in the Housing Corporation that have been having an impact in all of our communities across the Northwest Territories. In terms of HELP units, I answered the question earlier. It's based on demand for the program, and, if the demand is not there, then we are going to turn it into a market rent unit and vice versa. If the market unit is there and it's not being used, we will turn it into a HELP unit. Some of these programs are application based, so it's really based on the application and whether or not residents meet those criteria for the application. Once again, I apologize if I came off any way saying that the Member had mentioned anything bad about the regional office, but I do not believe I did. I just wanted to put that out there. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 490-18(3): Home Ownership Program in Fort Simpson
Oral Questions

Page 4690

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4690

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as follow-up to my Member's statement on trapping season I would like to ask the Minister responsible for ENR if he could share the numbers. You know what, many of us here have Facebook accounts, and we see all of the nice pictures people put on, whether it's trapping, hunting, but I have seen in my riding a number of young people starting to get into trapping. So can the Minister share numbers from the last trapping season on the number of trappers, if they have seen an increase or a decrease? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4690

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, from November 2017 to June 2018, which is basically the trapping season, there were 661 trappers in the Northwest Territories. They marketed about $622,000 of Northern fur for that particular year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

I know many of my constituents, especially the ones who go out, bring in a lot of furs. I just have a question. I would like to get an update on the uptake on the Grubstake Program. I know this Territory is a leader that is pretty much the only territory -- none of the provinces that I know of have a grubstake program similar to ours. Just a little update from the Minister on that program?

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

As far as I know, we are the only jurisdiction in the country that offers a grubstake program as far as traditional fur harvesting goes, and we are quite proud of that fact. We recognize the fact that it is an important economy in the Northwest Territories. The Member is absolutely correct. We are starting to see more and more young people get back into the traditional lifestyle. We are getting a lot of support from the government.

As well, I know of a couple of Aboriginal governments, I think the GTC has a great program where they support the young people who are trying to get back into trapping.

Trap and Grubstake Program allocated a total of $101,000 for the current 2018-2019 trapping year. We have it broken down by regions, as well. I think in the BeauDel last year, there was about $34,000 that was allocated through the Grubstake Program.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

The department has started a new initiative in the Mackenzie Delta, especially in Aklavik-Inuvik, with harvesting of beaver this past spring here. It was very, very productive. You know, the community has seen over $100,000 brought into the community of Aklavik alone; the communities that were a part of this. It wasn't cash into the communities, but it was money that went into cards, whether it was to the local Northern store. On that note, on-the-land collaborative, how many projects and how was this paid out?

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The program that the Member spoke about, I think I was in collaboration with the Aboriginal governments up there. I think IRC was heavily involved in that. My understanding was fairly successful program. As far as the on-the-land collaborative, we received a number of applications, I think it was about 104 applications, but 48 projects were approved. Approximately $1 million was dispersed to support on-the-land programming.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, a final run on this topic. I know in the past, even myself, I have attended a couple of trapping workshops. You know, it is always good to show our up-and-coming trappers new techniques and ways to set traps. Does the department plan to hold any more trapping workshops this winter?

I know a number of people have been asking about how to get traps in communities, especially the ones that don't have any hardware stores or anywhere to get them actually in town. Is the department planning to have any trapping workshops this winter? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

As far as the actual workshops, I am not quite sure of that detail. I will commit to getting that detail to see when and where we are having any workshops that are going out. I think the department is also coming forward to this Assembly, I believe, soon with the new initiative that they would like to try. I will not speak of it now, but it will be brought up before this Assembly as we deliberate the O and M budget during February-March. I think the folks out there will be pleased with the new initiatives that are coming out through ENR.

I will find the information on the actual workshops and where they are having them. I take the Member's point. I believe that they have had workshops in the past where they teach them how to prepare their furs properly to get the best prices for them. Trappers were appreciative of that because any little course you take, you gain some valuable experience out of it and increase your knowledge a bit. I will find out and share it with the Member. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 491-18(3): Fur Harvesting Programs
Oral Questions

Page 4691

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4691

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, this set of questions is for the Minister of Health and Social Services. Last winter we discussed the availability of family planning tools such as birth control and the medication that terminates an early-stage pregnancy called Mifegymiso. At that time, the Minister said his department was reviewing gaps in supplementary health benefits. Can the Minister update the House on the progress of this review as it relates to family planning? Mahsi.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4691

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the review of the supplementary health program is in relation to all coverage for all types of thing, including the things the Member has described. That review is going to take some time. It will likely go into the next government and be something the next government is going to have to make some hard decisions on.

We did have a brief chat this morning, and I did confirm that to the Member. Since then, I haven't had an opportunity to talk to the department. Taking the Member's point that waiting that long could be problematic for many, many women, I have issued a directive to the Department of Health and Social Services to put in some interim measures to cover the treatment or the Mifegymiso on an interim basis until the conclusion of the supplementary health review.

This means that it will be a payment of last resort and that individuals must use either NIHB, Extended Health Benefits, Metis Health Benefits, and an insurance if they have it through their employer or indigent health benefits. Basically, low-income workers who don't have insurance will be covered once this directive goes into place. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate the Minister taking proactive action on this. The other issue that we talked about last winter was exploring options to make the pill available in regional health centres. Has there been any progress on making this service available outside of Yellowknife?

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

There has been progress, but not enough. One of the challenges that we are facing is the diagnostic steps that need to be taken before the pill can be issued or prescribed. We are having some complications making sure that that can happen at a regional level. I commit to the Member that we will continue to do that work, and we will make sure that this is available through the NOW Program to all residents of the Northwest Territories. It will take a bit more time to make that happen.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate the Minister's efforts. Could he give us any proposed timing for resolving those issues? I guess at this point the question is: is it during the life of this Assembly, or will it be deferred until the next one?

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

After our conversation this morning, I did talk to the department and issued that directive. I did tell them that I wanted this other issue resolved as quickly as possible. There are a few technical issues we have to work through. They said they would get me a timeline on how long they think it might take, but I directed and indicated I want to see it happen in the life of this government and not dragged out into the life of the next.

Question 492-18(3): Availability of Family Planning Tools
Oral Questions

Page 4692

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for letting me clear out my closet of extra questions. This time, my questions are for the Minister of Infrastructure. The GNWT invested millions of dollars to construct a new office building in my riding. This building has been open for several years, and it's called, very glamorously, the New Government Building, or the NGB for short. Several constituents have approached me with names for this building, and my question for the Minister is: when will the Minister begin the process of finding a proper name for the NGB? Thank you.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That policy actually doesn't lie with me. Just because Infrastructure built the building and we have some of our staff in there, that policy of naming a building actually lies with the EIA, with the Premier's office, the Executive. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate the Minister's information. My question for the Premier is: when will the Minister begin the process of finding a proper name for the NGB? Thank you.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Wally Schumann Hay River South

I'm not the Premier. Let's get that straight. That question would have to be redirected to the Premier, and I can gladly have a conversation with the Premier after this sitting and see how we are going to move on that, if we are moving on that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, my question is for the Premier, and it's about finding a new name for the NGB. Could the Premier please review the policy that he is going to follow for finding a name for this building? Thank you.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

I would like to remind Members that, when you direct a certain question to a Minister, we stick to that Minister unless the Premier allows other Ministers to respond. At this point in time, I will allow the Infrastructure Minister to continue. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4692

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We will have a look at the policy and get back to the Member. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I have a process question. May I now ask my questions to the Premier as a separate set of questions? Mahsi. No? Okay, I'm done. Thank you.

Question 493-18(3): New Government Building Name
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Depending on the time if we still have some time. I will go to other Members, as well. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I hope I get the questions to the right Minister here. This is towards the Minister of Infrastructure. Recently, I've been advised of a sole-source contract. It seems to be a little bit out of the ordinary, and I'm looking for some clarification. Can the Minister of Infrastructure advise this House if the department has entered into a sole-source contract with Imperial Oil for providing fuel for the communities that rely on GNWT? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Yes, the department has entered into a sole-source contract for a period of three years. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I appreciate the Minister's answer. He kind of took part of my next question. Can the Minister advise this House how much the sole-source contract is worth for this three-year period?

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Wally Schumann Hay River South

The term of the contract is three years. It has a value of approximately $54 million, depending on the volume of fuel that is required to resupply the communities by barge. It should be noted that either party can terminate the contract with proper notice, and the GNWT has saved approximately $600,000 per year with this contract.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I appreciate the Minister for providing that answer to us here today, and a little bit more information, as well. It was very helpful. Can the Minister explain why the contract was not sent out for tender process, and if he reached out to northern businesses to see if they are able to deal with this contract?

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Wally Schumann Hay River South

In 2016 the department issued a tender for a resupply of fuel, and Imperial Oil was the only company that submitted a bid because Imperial Oil is the only company in Hay River that owns the infrastructure to safely unload from rail to cars into the barges.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank the Minister for that answer. Mr. Speaker, this seems to be a large amount of money to be sole-sourced. I've looked at the Financial Administration Act, and I know the Executive Council made on behalf of the government authorized contracts, authorized to enter into a contract that falls within a class of contracts. However, the Executive Council must record its reasons for authorized contracts entered into these things. Can the Minister advise how he was able to enter a sole-source contract for this type of huge amount of money, and if there was a record of decision? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Wally Schumann Hay River South

The department has the authority to enter into this sole-source contract, and it was posted and recorded on the Government of the Northwest Territories e-Procurement website. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 494-18(3): Sole-Source Contracting for Fuel Resupply
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4693

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Sorry, Mr. Speaker. You just caught me a bit off guard. I was trying to send a note to the Minister of Infrastructure. You didn't get it yet?

Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to ask a general question. I want to try to provide a little more detail on what I'm trying to get to, but, Mr. Speaker, I want to ask the Minister if the Minister has any flexibility on large tenders? What I'm asking is what the flexibility would be; if the two bids were very close and there was this southern bid, would the full application of any BIP or anything that would be in a southern bid was just marginally out, I guess had more points, was low enough that the northern bidder would be close enough but not within the policy? I'd like to ask the Minister, if something was that close, for the benefit of the North, to keep the money in the North, if the Minister has flexibility to decide to go with a northern bidder? Thank you.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4693

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. When we put large projects, particularly projects over a million dollars, out to bid, there is criteria that follow the BIP policy and procurement policy, and there are a number of adjustments that are made in there for northern businesses: Local bid, BIP companies, then there's content for NWT, labour force, NWT procurement within that contract. There are a number of adjustments that are already put into place that give the Northwest Territories a little bit of an advantage over a southern contractor. These things are put into place to be able to leverage northern companies to be able to compete with big southern companies who want to bid on some of these projects.

If there was a southern company that came in lower than a northern company with that bid content, I am not going to go, and I don't think our financial administration policy is going to let us go there and just change the bid to give a northern company the edge over it because they were a little bit higher than the southern company. There's a process that's laid out, and there are a number of policies and procedures put into place to help us leverage that content for northern procurement and businesses to take advantage of that, and we have to stick to that. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

I realize that there have been adjustments to the BIP policy. I would like to ask the Minister if there would be any consideration to increasing that lower threshold. Right now, my understanding is that at about $1 million, you could have a 15 percent advantage, 20 percent advantage, but, once you get over that, then I think the preference is minor. The presence may be 3 percent, 2 percent, or a very low percentage at the end of the day. I would like to ask the Minister if he would consider again looking at that to increase that amount to try to ensure that the money stays in the North. Right now the northern companies need work, and as the current policy lies it's easy for a southern company to bid low enough to bid out the northern companies that maybe have higher operating costs by being up here.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Wally Schumann Hay River South

First of all I think to lighten the mood it's our last day in the House. We always say the BIP policy is the best policy in the Government of the Northwest Territories, but the Minister of ENR tells me the Grubstake Program is the best policy in the Northwest Territories.

I think one of the things that I would possibly consider that would give me a little more flexibility is on some of these large projects, particularly through Infrastructure, is I can have a look at some of these bigger projects and look at if there is a way to split them up to make them not so big, maybe break them down into smaller contracts. That is something that I can endeavour to do, especially when we are rolling out some of this new money that we have got coming. That would give us, you know, a little bit more of an advantage, because I think some of the questions that come around some of these bigger projects is people always say, "Business is slow in the South, and they are starting to look north."

That could be the case, but our northern businesses have to be competitive. We have got to have value for money, and we have got to have a balance of what we are doing, but I can certainly have a look at some of these bigger contracts, particularly around some of the infrastructure stuff, and maybe looking at maybe breaking out some of these things to make them smaller pieces.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

The Minister's idea about debundling, I think, is a good idea. I would like to ask the Minister, if he was to debundle a project, for example, of something that's worth $10 million debundled into two or three projects, if the smaller the bundles are the better opportunities there are for northern companies. So I would like to ask the Minister if he could break the bundles down to a point where it gives the best advantage to northern companies?

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As I said, you know, I think that's something I can certainly have a look at. There still has to be value for money. We cannot have tailored everything to just northern businesses. We have got to have value for money because the competitive process allows for the best price to come forward for the Government of the Northwest Territories, ultimately the taxpayers and residents of the NWT. I can certainly have a look at some of these projects of concern. It's just taking a highway contract, for example, possibly maybe breaking out the crushing totally separate from maybe the whole project, being crushing to drainage to embankment, to all these types of things, to bring these projects to a little bit smaller scale where NWT businesses will have a little more competitive advantage versus a fully bundled project.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That is an interesting answer from the Minister. The Minister talked about maybe an idea of debundling crushing, so if that is the case, does the Minister see something like crushing material for a highway as more of a manufacturing? Is it something that adds value, added value for the Northwest Territories? Would crushing be considered a northern manufactured product? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4694

Wally Schumann Hay River South

There is a definition for "northern manufacturers," and I do not believe crushing fits under that criteria. I can certainly check with the department, but I do not believe that falls under there. In fact I believe some people have already asked to submit that and asked if that was a manufactured product. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 495-18(3): Flexibility for Large Tenders/Northern Bids for Contracts
Oral Questions

Page 4695

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Thank you for your patience. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Premier and Minister of Executive and Indigenous Affairs. The GNWT has invested millions of dollars to construct a new office building in my riding. The building has been open for several years, and it is called the New Government Building, or the NGB. Several constituents have approached me with names for this building. My question is: when will the Premier begin the process of finding a proper name for this building? Mahsi.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Honourable Premier.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I kind of like that NGB name itself. Generally we respond to public interest, so if there is public interest to name the building, we have a government policy that focuses on two areas when it comes to naming of buildings. One aspect is how to set up a process that is fair and gives everybody who is interested in submitting a name an opportunity to do so. Also we have some criteria as to what types of names. For example, we are not going to name buildings after people who are alive. So that is the kind of criteria, but if there is any indication of public interest, we would be more than pleased to look at doing so.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate that answer. How does this process work in terms of getting these expressions of interest which I have received informally about finding a proper name into the process the Premier just described?

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

I am told that we are starting a process that will provide for the naming of the NGB building, and I think that will be out shortly. As I said, the authority to set up the process and approve the name of a new building lies with Cabinet, and I think we would want to make sure that the names that are submitted are respectful. I think in England, where they had a naming contest for a new boat, they came up with "Boaty McBoatface" or something like that, so we would want to try to come up with a fair process that comes up with a respectful name.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mr. Speaker, I can appreciate "Building McBuilding" would not be a great outcome of this process, but I do understand that there is some criteria. Other than the fact that the person cannot be alive, can the Premier tell us anything else about the criteria for naming?

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

We will circulate the policy for naming of buildings. I know there are NGB buildings in other communities, as well, so we will make sure that information is available. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker, and thank you to the Premier for that. So does the Premier envision this process being complete in the life of this Assembly?

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

Bob McLeod Yellowknife South

We have had a number of suggestions for naming of buildings, and so for that reason we came up with a government policy. The policy has a definition for an "office building." The definition is based on the purpose of the building. Some of the guidelines are: we need Cabinet approval; we will consider whether the proposed name reflects the historical, cultural, and geographical significance of the Northwest Territories; GNWT-owned office buildings may be named in honour of deceased persons who have made significant contributions to public life; and GNWT-owned office buildings will not be named in honour of living persons, as I said; and we may approve a public engagement process to solicit naming ideas for GNWT-owned office buildings. So we would endeavour to enter that process for the buildings that the Member has raised. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 496-18(3): New Government Building
Oral Questions

Page 4695

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Item 8, written questions. Item 9, returns to written questions. Item 10, replies to Commissioner's opening address. Item 11, petitions. Item 12, reports of standing and special committees. Item 13, reports of committees on the review of bills. Item 14, tabling of documents. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Tabled Document 286-18(3): Grants and Contributions Results Report 2017-2018 Tabled Document 287-18(3): Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4695

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents entitled "Grants and Contributions Results Report 2017-2018" and "Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 286-18(3): Grants and Contributions Results Report 2017-2018 Tabled Document 287-18(3): Energy Initiatives Report 2017-2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4695

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister responsible for the Northwest Territories Housing Corporation.

Tabled Document 288-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Annual Report 2017-2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to section 23(2) of the NWT Housing Corporation Act, I wish to table the following document entitled "Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Annual Report 2017-2018." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 288-18(3): Northwest Territories Housing Corporation Annual Report 2017-2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Tabled Document 289-18(3): Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority 2017-2018 Annual Report Tabled Document 290-18(3): Annual Report 2017-2018 NWT Health and Social Services System Tabled Document 291-18(3): Tlicho Community Services Agency Health and Social Services Annual Report 2017-2018 Tabled Document 292-18(3): Annual Report 2017-2018 Hay River Health and Social Services Authority
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, pursuant to section 32(2) of the Financial Administration Act, I wish to table the following four documents entitled "Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority 2017-2018 Annual Report," "Annual Report 2017-2018 NWT Health and Social Services System," "Tlicho Community Services Agency Health and Social Services Annual Report 2017-2018," and "Annual Report 2017-2018 Hay River Health and Social Services Authority." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 289-18(3): Northwest Territories Health and Social Services Authority 2017-2018 Annual Report Tabled Document 290-18(3): Annual Report 2017-2018 NWT Health and Social Services System Tabled Document 291-18(3): Tlicho Community Services Agency Health and Social Services Annual Report 2017-2018 Tabled Document 292-18(3): Annual Report 2017-2018 Hay River Health and Social Services Authority
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Tabling of documents. Minister of Finance.

Tabled Document 293-18(3): Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1 to June 30, 2018) Tabled Document 294-18(3): Public Accounts 2017-2018, Sections I, II, III and IV
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to section 74(3) and 35(1) of the Financial Administration Act, I wish to table the following two heavy documents entitled "Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1 to June 30, 2018)" and "Public Accounts 2017-2018, Sections I, II, III and IV." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 293-18(3): Inter-Activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1 to June 30, 2018) Tabled Document 294-18(3): Public Accounts 2017-2018, Sections I, II, III and IV
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Tabled Document 295-18(3): Annual Reports for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2017-2018 School Year Ending June 30, 2018 Tabled Document 296-18(3): Operating Plans for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2018-2019 School Year Ending June 30, 2019
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Pursuant to section 32(2) of the Financial Administration Act, I wish to table the following two also heavy documents entitled "Annual Reports for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2017-2018 School Year Ending June 30, 2018" and "Operating Plans for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2018-2019 School Year Ending June 30, 2019." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 295-18(3): Annual Reports for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2017-2018 School Year Ending June 30, 2018 Tabled Document 296-18(3): Operating Plans for Northwest Territories Education Bodies for the 2018-2019 School Year Ending June 30, 2019
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of Justice.

Tabled Document 297-18(3): Annual Report on the Activities of the Rental Officer April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, earlier this sitting I tabled the Annual Report on the Activities of the Rental Officer. The Department of Justice has found an error in the document on pages 8 and 20 of the report. The English portion overstated the value of monetary compensation orders in 2017-2018 as $7.3 million instead of the correct number of $1.7 million. This error was made by the department in the completion of the document and not by the rental officer in their submission of the report. With that, Mr. Speaker, pursuant to section 74.2(2) of the Residential Tenancies Act, I wish to table "Annual Report on the Activities of the Rental Officer April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 297-18(3): Annual Report on the Activities of the Rental Officer April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4696

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Tabled Document 298-18(3): Correspondence from Native Women's Association to Health and Social Services Minister Abernethy, Received Oct. 31, 2018 regarding Auditor General of Canada 2018 Report on Child and Family Service Delivery Tabled Document 299-18(3): Correspondence from Deninu Kue First Nation to Health and Social Services Minister Abernethy on Reopening 'Our Great Elders Facility' in Fort Resolution, Dated October 12, 2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4697

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marsi cho, Mr. Speaker. I have two documents to table. The first is a letter from the Native Women's Association NWT that was written to the Honourable Glen Abernethy, Minister of Health and Social Services, and the second is a petition that does not meet all of the guidelines of a petition to be tabled, so I am presenting this as a letter from the Deninu Kue First Nation to the Honourable Minister Abernethy, Department of Health and Social Services, on the Fort Resolution 'Our Great Elders Facility.' Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 298-18(3): Correspondence from Native Women's Association to Health and Social Services Minister Abernethy, Received Oct. 31, 2018 regarding Auditor General of Canada 2018 Report on Child and Family Service Delivery Tabled Document 299-18(3): Correspondence from Deninu Kue First Nation to Health and Social Services Minister Abernethy on Reopening 'Our Great Elders Facility' in Fort Resolution, Dated October 12, 2018
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4697

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Item 15, notices of motion. Item 16, notices of motion for first reading of bills. Item 17, motions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Motion 25-18(3): Appointment of Chair to the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council, Carried
Motions

Page 4697

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, WHEREAS Section 21 (1) of the Territorial Emblems and Honours Act provides for the creation of a Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council to review nominations and recommend appointments to the Order of the Northwest Territories;

AND WHEREAS in May 2018 the following members were appointed to the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council;

  • Ms. Sabrina Broadhead of Hay River;
  • Mr. Danny Gaudet of Deline; and
  • Ms. Anne Peters of Yellowknife.

AND WHEREAS Section 23(1) of the Territorial Emblems and Honours Act provides that the Legislative Assembly, on the recommendation of the Board of Management, shall designate a member of the Council as chairperson of the Council;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Mr. Danny Gaudet of Deline be appointed as Chair of the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 25-18(3): Appointment of Chair to the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council, Carried
Motions

Page 4697

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 25-18(3): Appointment of Chair to the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council, Carried
Motions

Page 4697

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 25-18(3): Appointment of Chair to the Northwest Territories Honours Advisory Council, Carried
Motions

Page 4697

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Motions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Motion 26-18(3): Appointment to the Special Committee on Transition Matters, Carried
Motions

Page 4697

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker Mr. Speaker, WHEREAS the Consensus Government Process Convention on Priority Setting and Reporting calls for the establishment of a Special Committee on Transition Matters;

AND WHEREAS transition to a new Assembly is an appropriate time for reporting on matters of on-going action, discussion and consideration;

AND WHEREAS Members of the 19th Legislative Assembly may wish to consider how to build on the direction and deliberations of the 18th Legislative Assembly;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Thebacha, that pursuant to Rule 92(1), the Legislative Assembly hereby establish a Special Committee on transition matters;

AND FURTHER, that the following Members be named to the Special Committee:

  • The Member for Hay River North, Mr. R.J. Simpson, Chair;
  • The Member for Frame Lake, Mr. Kevin O'Reilly;
  • The Member for Great Slave, Mr. Glen Abernethy;
  • The Member for Hay River South, Mr. Wally Schumann;
  • The Member for Kam Lake, Mr. Kieron Testart; and
  • The Member for Nahendeh, Mr. Shane Thompson

AND FURTHERMORE, that the Special Committee on Transition Matters be established by the terms of reference, identified as Tabled Document 277-18(3).

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 26-18(3): Appointment to the Special Committee on Transition Matters, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 26-18(3): Appointment to the Special Committee on Transition Matters, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 26-18(3): Appointment to the Special Committee on Transition Matters, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Motion 27-18(3): Appointment to the Human Rights Adjudication Panel, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, WHEREAS Section 48(1) of the Human Rights Act provides for the establishment of an adjudication panel composed of at least three persons, appointed by the Commissioner on the recommendation of the Legislative Assembly;

AND WHEREAS Section 48(4) of the Human Rights Act provides that the members of the panel hold office, during good behaviour, for a term of four years, with the exception of the first members appointed;

AND WHEREAS on November 2, 2018 there will be one vacancy on the adjudication panel;

AND WHEREAS the Board of Management is tasked with recommending individuals to the Legislative Assembly and the Legislative Assembly is prepared to make a recommendation to the Commissioner;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Mr. Colin Baile of Yellowknife be recommended to the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories for reappointment as a member of the Human Rights Adjudication Panel, effective immediately for a term of four years.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 27-18(3): Appointment to the Human Rights Adjudication Panel, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 27-18(3): Appointment to the Human Rights Adjudication Panel, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 27-18(3): Appointment to the Human Rights Adjudication Panel, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Motion 28-18(3): Establishment of a Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly, Carried
Motions

Page 4698

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. WHEREAS, the Members of the 18th Legislative Assembly agreed upon a priority to support initiative designed to increase the number of women running for elected office in the Northwest Territories;

AND WHEREAS on March 8, 2018, a motion was adopted by the Legislative Assembly establishing a goal of increasing the representation of women in the Legislative Assembly to 20 percent by 2023 and to 30 percent by 2027;

AND WHEREAS on May 31, 2018, the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly tabled a Discussion Paper on "Temporary Special Measures" to Increase the Representation of Women in the NWT Legislative Assembly;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Nahendeh, that pursuant to Rule 92(1), the Legislative Assembly hereby establish a Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly;

AND FURTHER, that the following Members be named to the Special Committee:

  • The Member for Yellowknife Centre, Ms. Julie Green, Chair;
  • The Member for Deh Cho, Mr. Michael M. Nadli;
  • The Member for Nunakput, Mr. Herbert Nakimayak;
  • The Member for Range Lake, Ms. Caroline Cochrane;
  • The Member for Thebacha, Mr. Louis Sebert; and
  • The Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, Mr. Tom Beaulieu.

AND FURTHERMORE, that the Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly be established by the terms of reference, identified as Tabled Document 278-18(3). Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 28-18(3): Establishment of a Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 28-18(3): Establishment of a Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 28-18(3): Establishment of a Special Committee to Increase the Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Motion 29-18(3): Appointment of Human Rights Commission Members Carried
Motions

Page 4699

Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. WHEREAS Section 16(2) of the Human Rights Act provides that the Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission is composed of such members, between three and five in number, as may be appointed by the Commissioner on the recommendation of the Legislative Assembly;

AND WHEREAS on November 2, 2018, there will be two vacancies on the commission;

AND WHEREAS the Board of Management is tasked with recommending individuals to the Legislative Assembly and the Legislative Assembly is prepared to make a recommendation to the Commissioner;

NOW THEREFORE I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Mr. Yacub Adam of Yellowknife be recommended to the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories for reappointment as a member of the Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission, effective immediately for a term of four years;

AND FURTHER, that Ms. Gerri Sharpe of Yellowknife be recommended to the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories for reappointment as a member of the Northwest Territories Human Rights Commission, effective immediately for a term of four years. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 29-18(3): Appointment of Human Rights Commission Members Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 29-18(3): Appointment of Human Rights Commission Members Carried
Motions

Page 4699

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 29-18(3): Appointment of Human Rights Commission Members Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Motion 30-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to February 5, 2019, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Great Slave, that, notwithstanding Rule 4, when this House adjourns on November 1, 2018, it shall be adjourned until Tuesday, February 5, 2019;

AND FURTHER, that any time prior to February 5, 2019, if the Speaker is satisfied, after consultation with the Executive Council and Members of the Legislative Assembly, that the public interest requires that the House should meet at an earlier time during the adjournment, the Speaker may give notice and thereupon the House shall meet at the time stated in such notice and shall transact its business as it has been duly adjourned to that time. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Motion 30-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to February 5, 2019, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 30-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to February 5, 2019, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 30-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to February 5, 2019, Carried
Motions

Page 4699

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Item 18, first reading of bills. Item 19, second reading of bills. Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 911 Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4699

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Range Lake, that Bill 31, Northwest Territories 911 Act, be read for the second time.

The bill directs the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs to establish the NWT 911 service, a service for receiving and transferring emergency calls within the NWT. The bill binds the Government of the Northwest Territories and mandates the participation of telecommunications carriers, local authorities, and emergency service providers in the NWT 911 service.

The bill establishes a 911 cost-recovery fee and requires every local subscriber to a telephone service to pay the fee. Telecommunications carriers are required to comply with any prescribed registration and reporting requirements and to bill subscribers, collect the fee, and remit the fee to the Government of the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 911 Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order to the principle of the bill.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 911 Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 31: Northwest Territories 911 Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 31 has had its second reading. It is now referred to the standing committee. Second reading of bills. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Bill 32: Naturopathic Profession Statutes Amendment Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Range Lake, that Bill 32, Naturopathic Profession Statutes Amendment Act, be read for the second time.

This bill amends various statutes administered by the Department of Health and Social Services to allow for the passage of regulations regulating the naturopathic doctors' profession in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 32: Naturopathic Profession Statutes Amendment Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order to the principle of the bill.

Bill 32: Naturopathic Profession Statutes Amendment Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 32: Naturopathic Profession Statutes Amendment Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 32 has had its second reading. It is now referred to the standing committee. Second reading of bills. Item 20, consideration in Committee of the Whole of bills and other matters: Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process; Minister's Statement 103-18(3), Marine Transportation Services, with Member for Hay River North in the chair.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

I now call Committee of the Whole to order. What is the wish of the committee? Mr. Beaulieu.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, committee would like to consider Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process, and Minister's Statement 103-18(3), Marine Transportation Services. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. Does committee agree?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. We have agreed to consider Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process. I will open up the floor to comments. Seeing none, does committee agree this concludes our consideration of Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. Next, we have agreed to consider Minister's Statement 103-18(3), Marine Transportation Services. I will open up the floor to comments or questions from committee. Seeing none, does committee agree this concludes our consideration of Minister's Statement 103-18(3), Marine Transportation Services?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. What is the wish of committee? Mr. Beaulieu.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Mr. Chair, I move that the chair rise and report progress.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. There is a motion to report progress. The motion is in order and non-debatable. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

I will rise and report progress.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

May I have the report, Member for Hay River North?

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Mr. Speaker, your committee has been considering Minister's Statement 19-18(3) and Minister's Statement 103-18(3), and would like to report progress and the consideration of Minister's Statement 19-18(3) and Minister's Statement 103-18(3) as concluded. Mr. Speaker, I move that the report of the Committee of the Whole be concurred with.

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4700

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Do I have a seconder? Member for Yellowknife Centre. She's very excited today. The motion is in order. All those in favour. All those opposed. Motion carried.

---Carried

Masi. Item 22, third reading of bills. Minister of Justice.

Bill 20: Ombud Act
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

Louis Sebert Thebacha

I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 20, Ombud Act, be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I requested a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 20: Ombud Act
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 20: Ombud Act
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 20: Ombud Act
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave, the Member for Yellowknife South, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4701

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand. The results of the recorded vote: 16 in favour; zero opposed; zero abstentions. Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 20 has had its third reading. Third reading of bills. Mr. Clerk, will you ascertain if the Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, the Honourable Margaret Thom, is ready to enter the Chamber and to assent bills.

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

Page 4701

Commissioner Ms. Thom

Please be seated. Mr. Speaker and Members of the Legislative Assembly, good afternoon.

[English translation not provided.]

It has been a while since I have been here in this great place. I am thankful to see you all again in good health. Mahsi, thank you.

I would like to take a moment to encourage all residents to honour the dedication, proud service, and the many sacrifices made by current and past members of the Canadian Armed Forces. Remembrance Day is on Sunday, November 11th. I have been invited to Hay River this year to take part in their services, and I look forward to visiting for such an important occasion.

As this sitting comes to an end, I would like to wish the Members of this House good health, happiness, and prosperity as you enjoy the coming Christmas holiday season with your loved ones.

I wish you all safe travels on the land, in the air, on the ice, and on our highways as you continue to work together, cooperatively, for the betterment of all residents of the Northwest Territories.

Now, as Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, I am pleased to assent to the following bills:

  • Bill 7, Chartered Professional Accountants Act
  • Bill 8, Emergency Management Act
  • Bill 13, An Act to Amend the Securities Act
  • Bill 14, Miscellaneous Statute Law Amendment Act, 2017
  • Bill 15, Document Formalization, Service and Notice Reform Statute Law Amendment Act
  • Bill 16, An Act to Amend the Social Assistance Act
  • Bill 17, An Act to Amend the Student Financial Assistance Act
  • Bill 18, An Act to Amend the Cities, Towns and Villages Act
  • Bill 20, Ombud Act
  • Bill 24, An Act to Amend the Elections and Plebiscites Act
  • Bill 27, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 3, 2018-2019
  • Bill 28, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 3, 2018-2019
  • Bill 33, Appropriations Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), 2019-2020

Mahsi cho. Thank you. Quyanainni. Merci beaucoup. Koana.

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

Page 4701

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Please be seated. Colleagues, I would like to extend the appreciation of this House to the Commissioner, Margaret Thom. It was a pleasure to have her in the House today.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank all of the Pages who have been with us and who have served during our session here. Our youth are our future, as we all have stated, and our greatest resource. It is always a pleasure to have our youth as part of our Chambers.

I also thank the interpreters who have been with us throughout this session, as well. They are Mary Rose Sundberg, Margaret Mackenzie, Berna Matto, Sarah Cleary, Tom Unka, and David Black. Thank you all for the services that you provide each and every day for us.

Colleagues, our Indigenous languages are not second-class in this House. We are proud of our official languages, all the languages. We will continue to take measures to use and also celebrate our Indigenous languages and to ensure that they are treated as equal to English and French. If we want to see our indigenous languages grow and thrive throughout this territory, we must lead by example in this House.

Finally, I would like to extend a special thank you to Gail Bennett for her assistance over the past two months. Gail, you will always have a place at this table and we truly, truly appreciate the expertise and dedication that you provide to us. Masi for that.

---Applause

Colleagues, during the past month you have achieved a great deal and you should feel very proud of the work that you have done to date. I thank all of you for your continued dedication to this House, our form of consensus-style government, and to the people of the Northwest Territories.

This house will not sit again until February; however, I know that you will all be busy with your constituency work in your communities, in your regions, the committee work, the ongoing business of the government, and most importantly, your family and friends. I wish you safe travels as you return to your constituencies.

Madam Clerk, orders of the day.

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

Page 4702

Committee Clerk Of The House Ms. Franki-Smith

Orders of the day for Tuesday, February 5, 2019, 1:30 p.m.:

[Translation]

  1. Prayer
  2. Ministers' Statements
  3. Members' Statements
  4. Returns to Oral Questions
  5. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
  6. Acknowledgments
  7. Oral Questions
  8. Written Questions
  9. Returns to Written Questions
  10. Replies to the Commissioner's Opening Address
  11. Petitions
  12. Reports of Standing and Special Committees
  13. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills
  14. Tabling of Documents
  15. Notices of Motion
  16. Notices of Motion for First Reading of Bills
  17. Motions
  18. First Reading of Bills
  19. Second Reading of Bills
  20. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
  21. Report of Committee of the Whole
  22. Third Reading of Bills
  23. Orders of the Day

[Translation ends]

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

Page 4702

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi for that. [Translation] Very nice. [Translation ends] This House stands adjourned until Tuesday, February 5, 2019, at 1:30 p.m.

---ADJOURNMENT

The House adjourned at 3:59 p.m.