This is page numbers 4183 - 4214 of the Hansard for the 18th Assembly, 3rd Session. The original version can be accessed on the Legislative Assembly's website or by contacting the Legislative Assembly Library. The word of the day was work.

Topics

Members Present

Hon. Glen Abernethy, Mr. Beaulieu, Mr. Blake, Hon. Caroline Cochrane, Ms. Green, Hon. Jackson Lafferty, Hon. Robert McLeod, Mr. McNeely, Hon. Alfred Moses, Mr. Nadli, Mr. Nakimayak, Mr. O'Reilly, Hon. Wally Schumann, Hon. Louis Sebert, Mr. Simpson, Mr. Testart, Mr. Thompson, Mr. Vanthuyne

The House met at 10:01 a.m.

Prayer
Prayer

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Elder Christine Tatti

[English translation not provided.]

Prayer
Prayer

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Please be seated. Item 2, Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for the Status of Women.

Prayer
Prayer

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I seek unanimous consent to waive Rule 36(4) so that all Ministers' statements provided to the Clerk can be delivered today. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

---Unanimous consent granted

Prayer
Prayer

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Ministers' statements. Minister responsible for the Status of Women.

Minister's Statement 87-18(3): Increasing Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly
Ministers' Statements

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Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Mr. Speaker, yesterday, a discussion paper tabled by the Speaker of the Legislative Assembly titled "Temporary Special Measures to Increase the Participation of Women in the NWT Legislative Assembly" was tabled.

On March 8, 2018, a motion was adopted by the Legislative Assembly establishing a goal of increasing the representation of women in the Legislative Assembly to 20 per cent by 2023 and 30 per cent by 2027. It was my honour to second this motion, made by the Member for Yellowknife Centre, MLA Julie Green. Members understand that the white paper is intended to generate discussion on the advancement of these goals.

We must take the opportunity to discuss our common objective, set out in the mandate, to support initiatives designed to increase the number of women running for elected office in the Northwest Territories. Women's voices are important in leadership at all levels of government: community, territorial, federal and Indigenous governments. Advancing women's participation in a range of forums is crucial to the political and social development of our territory.

Mr. Speaker, the Women's Advisory unit and the Department of Executive and Indigenous Affairs have been working throughout the 18th Legislative Assembly on measures designed to increase the number of women in leadership.

Those who know me know that I am passionate about getting more women into leadership roles. I take every opportunity I can to promote women in leadership at all levels and in any forum available. I know that my colleague, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, also promotes this work to the best of her ability. However, Mr. Speaker, we cannot do this work alone, nor should we. It is imperative that everyone works together to advance women's representation in leadership positions.

As the Minister responsible for the Status of Women, I am glad to see such a high level of interest in the representation of women in this House. I call on the men in the House to support this movement and engage in these important conversations. I look forward to advancing the discussion in this Legislative Assembly and seeing real change throughout the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 87-18(3): Increasing Representation of Women in the Legislative Assembly
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Environment and Natural Resources.

Minister's Statement 88-18(3): Climate Change Strategic Framework
Ministers' Statements

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Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Government of the Northwest Territories made a mandate commitment to develop a territorial climate change strategy that takes into account northern energy demands and the cost of living, while reflecting international and national commitments to lower greenhouse gas emissions.

Earlier this month, the GNWT publicly released the 2030 NWT Climate Change Strategic Framework, our government's coordinated, comprehensive response to mitigating and adapting to climate change.

Working alongside the 2030 Energy Strategy and NWT Petroleum Resources Strategy, the Climate Change Strategic Framework provides the roadmap that will enable the Northwest Territories to transition to a strong, healthy economy that is less dependent on fossil fuels and that supports our residents in becoming more resilient and adaptive to a changing climate.

Our government recognizes the concerns that NWT residents have about the impacts of climate change, along with cost of living. This framework takes into account our unique northern energy needs, while aligning with international and national commitments to lowering greenhouse gas emissions, understanding the impacts of climate change on the North, and supporting our communities to become more resilient to those changes.

Mr. Speaker, Canada has committed to a 30 per cent reduction in annual greenhouse gas emissions by 2030. The GNWT has been actively working to address climate change and reduce greenhouse gas emissions for years and has set a consistent target for the Northwest Territories to ensure that we are contributing to the goals outlined in the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. Canada has expressed support for our plan, affirming that we are indeed doing our part to effectively and proportionately reduce our emissions by 2030.

The GNWT recognizes that we must also ensure our economy remains strong and viable while we take concrete actions to lower our dependence on fossil fuels and promote clean growth. Our government's united approach to addressing our unique northern needs in regard to energy and climate change will accomplish this.

Mr. Speaker, the Climate Change Strategic Framework provides the GNWT with a long-term, comprehensive, and coordinated response to climate change, outlined in three goals. The first goal is to transition to an economy that is less dependent on fossil fuels, thereby reducing our greenhouse gas emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030. The actions that we will take to achieve this are outlined in the 2030 Energy Strategy, which serves as the primary mechanism for reducing our greenhouse gas emissions related to energy supply and consumption. The framework will focus on tracking and reporting our progress.

The second goal of the framework is to increase our understanding of climate change impacts in the NWT, whether on the natural environment, residents' health and safety, culture and heritage, or infrastructure. Developing a better understanding of current and future impacts and opportunities will support informed decision-making at all levels.

The third goal is to build resilience and adapt to a changing climate. We need to find ways to adjust to changes that are occurring by adapting our planning and operational activities.

An action plan for achieving the Climate Change Strategic Framework's three goals is under development, and the public will be engaged on it over the summer. Once developed, the action plan will be implemented over the next five years through partnerships with Indigenous, community, and federal governments, along with non-government and industry stakeholders.

As the lead department responsible for climate change, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources will provide strong leadership on related coordination within the NWT and with other provinces, territories, and the federal government to implement the action plan.

Mr. Speaker, the GNWT remains committed to addressing the threats that climate change poses to the sustainability of our communities and the way of life of our residents. Though we have already invested millions in adaptation efforts related to climate change, alternative energy projects, energy retrofits, improved transportation infrastructure, and improved building standards, the GNWT recognizes that significant adaptation projects and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions cannot be realized without substantial federal funding, and we will continue to actively pursue funding opportunities as they arise.

I look forward to working with Northerners to establish a lower carbon economy, to increase our knowledge of climate impacts, and to build up our resiliency in the face of a changing climate. We know that there is still work to be done, and it will take time to achieve, but with a clear plan, and by working together, we can support a sustainable future that all will benefit from this long-term vision for generations to come. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 88-18(3): Climate Change Strategic Framework
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Justice.

Minister's Statement 89-18(3): Programs Available to Inmates in NWT Correctional Facilities
Ministers' Statements

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Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, our government has committed in its mandate to pursue innovative ways to prevent and reduce crime. The dedicated employees of the Department of Justice, in particular our frontline corrections professionals, know first-hand how important it is that our programs and services focus on the root causes that lead to an individual coming into contact with the justice system.

Within our correctional facilities, programs are delivered in a way that recognize the importance of culture and take into consideration the short time that most territorial inmates are incarcerated. Our corrections staff work with inmates to ensure that the time they spend in custody promotes their successful reintegration back into their communities.

After hearing feedback from MLAs, past and present inmates, and through the Auditor General's report regarding programming at the North Slave Correctional Centre, the Corrections Service has worked hard to develop basic life and pre-employment skills of inmates and incorporate cultural elements into our programs. Traditional healing programs will move from being offered inside the facility to being offered in the yard of the North Slave Correctional Centre now that the security upgrades are complete.

We are also offering a number of programs at many of our corrections facilities and recognize the importance of Indigenous cultures and traditions. The Substance Abuse Management, Violence Prevention, Living without Violence, and the Respectful Relationships programs are all evidence-based programs aimed at supporting inmates to become aware of the triggers that lead them to engage in unhealthy and unsafe behaviours. Traditional liaison officers or elders also participate in these programs to help inmates reflect on their culture and learning.

Since being launched in 2016, the Substance Abuse Management program has been delivered 23 times in correctional facilities and probation offices in Yellowknife, Hay River, Fort Providence, and Inuvik. The Corrections Service has also delivered two of these programs specifically for women, one at the Fort Smith Correctional Complex Women's Unit and another at the Yellowknife Probation Office.

Since its launch in 2017, the Violence Prevention and the Living without Violence programs have been delivered 20 times, including five times in probation offices in Yellowknife, Inuvik, Fort McPherson, Fort Good Hope and Hay River.

The Respectful Relationships program also launched last year and has been delivered 10 times, five of which were delivered in probation offices in Yellowknife, Behchokǫ̀, Inuvik, and Hay River.

The South Mackenzie Correctional Centre offers a range of in-house addictions programs unique to that facility. The addictions counsellor and traditional liaison officers deliver several programs including a two-week addictions program based on Indigenous cultures, values, and beliefs. They also offer a four-week pretreatment healing program where clients learn medicine wheel teachings and about how their behaviours can impact their family and their community. This program, along with the Red Road to Freedom program, teaches inmates that the four aspects of the Medicine Wheel, Emotional, Physical, Mental, and Spiritual, need to be kept in balance when dealing with issues in their lives, like substance abuse.

In addition to the programs that are being delivered to those individuals who are in the justice system, changes to the release planning process have made it possible for case managers to look for community programming options for inmates upon release. Where possible, clients are matched with similar programming so that they can continue to build the skills that are needed to prevent and reduce crime and harm in their lives.

Mr. Speaker, we also recognize the importance of offering programs and opportunities that support inmates in meeting their educational goals. Through our onsite instructors who work closely with local high schools and colleges, the Corrections Service is able to offer a range of educational programming. Inmates can access programs that include adult literacy, basic education, general education development, high school and exam preparation, trades exam preparation, life skills, and assistance with pursuing or registration into post-secondary courses.

I am pleased to report that, over the past year, approximately 130 inmates have taken part in education programming within our adult correctional facilities. Mr. Speaker, our goal is to prepare inmates for their eventual rehabilitation and reintegration back into their communities. The Department of Justice and the entire Corrections Service has been working hard to make sure that the programming and supports that we offer help to address the root causes of crime. This has meant committing to making sure that culturally appropriate programming is in place and to look at new ways to help inmates continue with similar programming in their communities upon their release. Through these efforts and the continued partnerships we have with other departments and stakeholders, we are making a difference in lives of Northerners and are helping to create safer, healthier communities in the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 89-18(3): Programs Available to Inmates in NWT Correctional Facilities
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister's statements. Minister of Health And Social Services.

Minister's Statement 90-18(3): Senior Citizens' Month
Ministers' Statements

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, June is Senior Citizens' Month. I encourage all Northerners to join me in recognizing and celebrating the valuable contributions that seniors and elders make within our families and communities.

In the Northwest Territories, our seniors and elders are the fastest growing segment of our population. Through the Our Elders, Our Communities framework and the Continuing Care Services Action Plan, our government is working to support our seniors and elders to live in their own homes and communities for as long as possible and to ensure that adequate supports are available for them when they can no longer do so.

We have also recently published an updated edition of the Seniors' Information Handbook, which provides a comprehensive list of programs and services that seniors and their caregivers can access towards making informed decisions that can help them remain independent and active in their home communities.

Senior Citizens' Month is one way that our society recognizes and appreciates the valuable contributions that our seniors and elders make to the fabric of our communities. This recognition month also serves to highlight important issues facing our seniors and elders, and, to that end, I would like to highlight two special days within the Senior Citizens' Month.

Today, June 1st, is Intergenerational Day, and I encourage Northwest Territories residents to reflect on the importance that intergenerational relationships have had in their own lives. Elders represent the heart and soul of our communities; they are respected for their knowledge, their experience, and their wisdom. Supporting our seniors and elders to remain living in their communities has the potential to enhance intergenerational relationships between our elders and the younger generations. Making it possible for seniors and elders to remain with their families for longer creates more opportunities for storytelling, sharing of traditional knowledge, and enrichment of culture and heritage.

Mr. Speaker, I would also like to highlight that June 15th is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. Raising public awareness about the abuse and neglect of seniors and elders is the first of many steps in preventing elder abuse. Abuse of older adults is more than just physical abuse. Elder abuse includes verbal, emotional, and financial abuse, and this problem is present in our communities. As part of the Continuing Care Services Action Plan, our government has committed to finalizing elder abuse screening tools in partnership with the NWT Seniors Society. Together, our goal is to decrease the rate of elder abuse in the NWT by increasing the awareness of elder abuse and ensuring that elders can access the supports that they need.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to further recognize the valuable work the NWT Seniors' Society does in the prevention of abuse of older adults. The society plays an important role in leading the government and non-government partners in this work through the NWT Network to Prevent the Abuse of Older Adults. The NWT Seniors' Society is committed to educating and working with partners and other organizations to reduce, prevent, and ultimately eradicate the abuse of older adults, and we are pleased to be working with them on these efforts.

Our government is gathering data and collaborating with the NWT Seniors' Society to develop a report to provide information relating to programs and services used by seniors and elders in the NWT. By working together with our partners, our government is improving our programs and services to best support our seniors and elders. Together, we are creating a future where they can remain safely independent and actively engaged in their home communities for as long as possible.

As the Minister responsible for Seniors, I want to recognize all of the seniors and elders who help to create the healthy and vibrant families and communities that we all want to be part of in the Northwest Territories. During Senior Citizens' Month and on Intergenerational Day and on Elder Abuse Awareness Day, I encourage all residents to celebrate the important role that our seniors and our elders have in all of our lives. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 90-18(3): Senior Citizens' Month
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Minister's Statement 91-18(3): 2018 Mining and Exploration Awards and 2018 Mining Week
Ministers' Statements

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Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, with our people-centered approach to managing natural resources, the Northwest Territories does mining differently. Last night, Premier McLeod on behalf of the government accepted the Diamonds Do Good Award from the Diamond Empowerment Fund and its global board of directors in recognition of our leadership and Indigenous participation and socio-economic management in our mining industry.

Mr. Speaker, our government is pleased to have our efforts to build and foster a socially conscious mining industry recognized. We call it the NWT difference. The Department of Industry, Tourism and Investment continues to work hard to set our territory apart as a jurisdiction where mining companies will want to work and invest. We want to make our territory a place that our partners can proudly say that their investments are helping to build and strengthen communities and contributing to a more prosperous future of the North. Mr. Speaker, the framework from our unique approach has been built on partnership with Indigenous and community governments as well as our valued mining partners. Partnership and cooperation is a way of life in the North and ensures Indigenous and non-Indigenous people are able to decide on and implement shared priorities.

Indigenous governments work with us to bring the varied and valued perspectives of their respective communities to the table through co-management boards. They contribute to regulatory decision-making through the Intergovernmental Council and benefit from resource- and revenue-sharing agreements that we have put in place. Indigenous-owned businesses and development corporations have led the way in the growth and success of the northern service sector that now supports our mines and is providing jobs and training opportunities for NWT residents.

In turn, our diamond mines have supported millions of dollars of community investments and legacy projects over the years to ensure communities will continue to benefit from mining long after their projects are gone. They have spent billions of dollars with northern businesses, nearly half with Indigenous-owned companies, and employ thousands of NWT residents in well-paying jobs, helping many excel and advance their initial employment into transferable careers in mining and the trades.

Mr. Speaker, these contributions deserve celebrating and, beginning tomorrow, we will do just that. As we do every year, our territory and government will celebrate NWT Mining Week with free events in Yellowknife designed to get people of all ages engaged with geology, prospecting, and mining history.

This year's Mining Week will also mark the opening of our formal nomination process for the second annual Mining and Exploration, or MAX Awards, which we are pleased to sponsor and present in partnership with the Chamber of Mines.

Interested parties are encouraged to nominate individuals and organizations in areas such as environmental and social responsibility, Indigenous achievements, and economic leadership. More information, including nomination forms, can be found by visiting Engage-ITI.ca.

Mr. Speaker, we are proud to support and celebrate the NWT mining sector. It is the largest contributor to our economy, and our government is committed to continuing our support and investment in the future of responsible resource development so there continues to be jobs, business opportunities, and a strong economy to celebrate for years to come. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Minister's Statement 91-18(3): 2018 Mining and Exploration Awards and 2018 Mining Week
Ministers' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Ministers' statements. Item 3, Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Temporary Special Measures
Members' Statements

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Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I want to thank you for tabling your discussion paper yesterday with the title "Temporary Special Measures to Increase the Representation of Women in the NWT Legislative Assembly." I appreciate your leadership in finding a solution to this longstanding injustice. I have spoken often and at length about this issue, culminating in my motion on International Women's Day to set targets for increased representation.

Mr. Speaker, the South Pacific island of Samoa is a democracy with roots the same as ours, in Britain. Samoa started with the same problem of under-representation. After considerable debate, the government amended its constitution in 2013 to guarantee five of 49 seats to women.

Mr. Speaker, the NWT legislature has set a target of doubling women's representation by 2023. That means four seats. All the work that goes into getting women to run and getting them elected will continue. Come the election, let's say voters elected three women, one short of the goal. In that case, the Legislative Assembly would create one additional temporary seat for the four-year term of that Assembly, and that seat would be occupied by a woman. Note that this is an additional seat, so that means the Legislative Assembly would then have 20 members.

The next question is: who would fill that seat? One way to answer that question is to look at candidates who earned the highest percentage of votes, but who were not elected. In the last election, the former Member for Hay River South earned the highest number of votes, but wasn't elected. In the 2011 election, it was Bertha Rabesca-Zoe, from your Monfwi riding, and in 2007, it was Denise Kurszewski from Inuvik Twin Lakes. Another way to fill the extra seat is to award it on the basis of representation by population.

The temporary in the title means just that. The seat, or seats, would be created for just one Assembly. When the next election comes, if the women's representation goal is met, there would be no extra seats. If it's not met, there would be extra seats to meet the goal.

Temporary special measures offer the possibility of a solution to the under-representation of women in this House. I believe that having more women here will encourage more women to run. When women demonstrate their competence, initiative, and tenacity, voters will be more likely to elect them.

Mr. Speaker, as we both know, it's time to take action on this issue, and I encourage Members of this House and the public to read the paper outlining this option and to join the debate. Mahsi.

Temporary Special Measures
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Frame Lake.

Intergenerational Equity through the Heritage Fund
Members' Statements

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Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. As noted by our Minister for Seniors, today, June 1st, is Intergenerational Day. Among the many awareness days and events, this national day is particularly important as a reminder of the power of making simple, respectful, intergenerational connections. It's the day where we should also consider how our actions today affect those who will come after us.

Intergenerational Day Canada provides an easy opportunity to raise awareness of the many benefits of connections between generations. Stereotypes of both young and old people are broken down when they learn about each other. Intergenerational Day Canada makes a powerful statement about the value of connecting within each and everyone's community and neighbourhood.

There is another side to intergenerational respect and heritage, and that's what I'd like to focus on today. It's the need for this generation to ensure that we don't take away from opportunities for future generations, and build a positive legacy from today's wealth to ensure the financial stability and prospects for all those who will come after us. That is supposed to be the goal of the NWT Heritage Fund. Since its inception in 2012, the NWT Heritage Fund has grown to a very small amount of only $17.1 million. The fund is so neglected that the last annual report posted on the government website is for 2014, and the website link to the statute and regulations doesn't even work. That neglect seems to spread to the promised discussion paper to revitalize the Heritage Fund and its legislation.

The intergenerational wisdom that prompted the creation of the Heritage Fund was sound, and we only have to look at other international examples to see the benefits of an aggressive wealth-building philosophy. Consider Norway, where, per capita, citizens hold the richest national wealth in the world, over a trillion dollars, thanks to vigorous royalty policy for non-renewalable resources and state ownership. Norway's standard of living has left Canada far behind.

Our NWT Heritage Fund website claims that "by accumulating financial assets for the future, by which point resources may have been depleted, the NWT Heritage Fund will play an important role in preserving the benefits of resource development for future generations." Those words and the $17 million in the fund won't even make a small dent in the housing needs for our seniors.

I will have questions for the Minister of Finance on improving intergenerational equity of residents of the Northwest Territories. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Intergenerational Equity through the Heritage Fund
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Sahtu.

Connecting Community Needs to Government Programs
Members' Statements

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Today is our last day of the spring session. The most controversial decision that was made by Members was Bill 6 to legalize cannabis. Making hard decisions, balanced decisions, for the people we serve is one of the many challenges that come with this job. However, Mr. Speaker, I look forward to my summer on engaging discussions with my community residents and leaders on the many prosperous funding sources available to making meaningful family security supports. Most importantly, Mr. Speaker, I witnessed the many hours and dedication of government and the staff on program and service delivery. Achieving success is being determined.

I put my speech down, because I want to speak from the heart on what I've learned as a first-time MLA to this government. I have grown to see and respect my colleagues and the passion I've seen from all levels of this government, right from our Premier's position to the Regular MLA side, and to the staff, on providing for the people of the Northwest Territories and making a difference, and going out there and securing the funding from all sources, what is given to us, as well as what is available for us through aggression on applications from the federal level.

I am truly inspired by our Premier's sessional statement, the health initiatives by our department and the Minister and the staff. Those differences of providing sound programming could be seen by the undertaking by the department: the new facility in Normal Wells; the new facility here in Stanton, and the renewed renovation plans for the old one; the new facility coming up in Hay River; the new facility coming up in Inuvik to provide long-term care through a new facility to our aging elders; advancing forward to provide sound education to the people we serve through revisiting and reforming the Arctic College Foundation Review; the housing programs.

Connecting Community Needs to Government Programs
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Member for Sahtu, your time for Members' statements has expired.

Connecting Community Needs to Government Programs
Members' Statements

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

---Unanimous consent granted

Connecting Community Needs to Government Programs
Members' Statements

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

My last department address is Housing Corporation. I was inspired by the statement made by our Minister yesterday. I have shared that with our leaders. There are multiple sources of programming here, in our community, our government, as well as the federal government. One could say there are millions, billions, just waiting to access for our community residents, to deliver to the ones that we represent.

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I look forward to working this summer on making a difference and, most importantly, taking advantage of the resources available during the last term of this government as well as the federal government. Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Connecting Community Needs to Government Programs
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Yellowknife North.

Power Rate Increases for Seniors
Members' Statements

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Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as noted, today is Intergenerational Day. That is a day when we remind ourselves of the importance of building connections between generations, connecting our elders and youth. Those connections in our communities make life richer for both younger and older people and support education, health, and our community wellness.

Today marks another annual observation, Mr. Speaker. Today is also Power Rate Increase Day. That's a day when for the past seven years the Public Utilities Board has approved the Power Corporation's annual application to increase power rate, the fees that all Northerners have no choice but to shell out to keep their homes heated and the lights on.

It's been seven years, Mr. Speaker, that we've been marking Power Rate Increase Day. In that time, this government has approved increases in the cost of power that have totaled nearly 40 per cent. That's a cost, Mr. Speaker, that everyone has to pay. It's a cost that affects the price of everything because, like it or not, everything relies on power. We have no choice.

That's a harder challenge for some than others, but many of our seniors don't have many options. Our elders have spent a lifetime working, building communities, raising families in the North. Now they deserve rest and reward, but, as we know, many of them are on fixed incomes and rely on government support for basic needs. When we think of the cost of fuel, I wonder: has income assistance increased by 40 per cent in seven years? Has the Seniors Fuel Subsidy risen that much over the same time? Of course it hasn't, so more and more of our seniors are actually having to go back into the workforce and subsidize their own income in order to live comfortably.

Mr. Speaker, our mandate commitments to NWT residents include lowering the cost of living and creating secure communities for all generations. That commitment should especially focus on people who have limited means and who can be most vulnerable to changes in their living conditions, especially when it has been our doing that has impacted those living conditions.

Our government has done well in the past few years to make sure its fiscal house is in order. We've done that through increased user fees, taxation, rate increases, et cetera. Now it's time to live up to our responsibility to make sure that our most vulnerable residents have the same chance to balance their books without being subject to additional costs or financial hardships.

Mr. Speaker, folks don't need more government handouts. They need less fees, less taxes, and they need cheaper power. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Power Rate Increases for Seniors
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Intergenerational Programs in Mackenzie Delta
Members' Statements

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today is Intergenerational Day. The work between our elders and youth is thriving in my riding, Mr. Speaker. Whether it is hunting, trapping, fishing, or language programs, both in the schools and on the land, Mr. Speaker, those teachings that our elders bring to our youth are thriving today.

Mr. Speaker, I see it in the last few years. Our youth are out hunting and sharing what they have harvested with the communities. Also, we have dance groups in our communities who are teaching our youth our traditional ways.

Mr. Speaker, I just wanted to acknowledge that today. Please keep up the good work in the communities. Mahsi cho.

Intergenerational Programs in Mackenzie Delta
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Kam Lake.

Power Rate Increases
Members' Statements

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to rise on the occasion of Power Rate Increase Day. Effective today, the Northwest Territories Power Corporation will increase electricity rates for its customers an average of 2 per cent. That means residential customers using around 1,000 kilowatt-hours in the winter will pay between $4 and $7.50 extra per month. This, compounded with the 40 per cent increase over seven years of electricity rate in the Northwest Territories, is increasingly making our cost of living untenable.

There is only so much we can do, being Northerners and having to accept the reality that some things will be more expensive here, but power doesn't necessarily have to be one of them. I firmly believe that the NWT has such tremendous hydroelectric potential that we could be a net exporter of hydroelectricity at some point in the near future.

To get there, we need a transformative plan and a real vision to expand our hydroelectric system and make connections with the south. This is the only real way, I believe, that we can effectively reduce our power rates. The current system is unsustainable. We are always going to see more and more increases year on year and more and more people struggling to pay.

That increases the cost to government. It increases the cost to our social programs. It increases the cost to the average household, the average Northerner. I do see the government is taking the Taltson hydro expansion seriously, but I have to question how seriously when they are committing their energy strategy and their climate-change strategy to this Taltson project and that 44 per cent of their greenhouse gas reductions depend on the completion of this project, yet we have received no federal funding.

If we are going to meet our commitments to climate change, if we are going to once and for all reduce the cost of living, we need to back this project. We need to make it a top priority with the time we have left in this Assembly and make sure we have the strongest case possible to finally put an end to the endless increases of the electricity rates in the Northwest Territories and make a real difference for our residents. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Power Rate Increases
Members' Statements

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Members' Statements

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Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Marci cho, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, in all my years in the public service, I have worked hard to increase the number of Priority 1 Indigenous candidates that are hired by the GNWT.

Mr. Speaker, I have worked as president of the NWT Housing Corporation and later became associate Deputy Minister for the Department of Environment and Natural Resources. In both instances, I worked to increase the number of Priority 1 and long-term NWT residents who are Priority 2 public servants. I am very thankful that the Department of Environment and Natural Resources has maintained high Priority 1 numbers, around 45 per cent.

Mr. Speaker, when I was the Minister of Human Resources, it was like pulling teeth to have the departments develop a five- to 10-year human resource plan. Indigenous people born and raised in the NWT feel that they do not receive the same consideration as others for government jobs.

Mr. Speaker, apprenticeship jobs would be ideal for Indigenous people that plan to remain in the NWT and pay their taxes, instead of relying on income support and short-term jobs to make ends meet. They, too, need an opportunity to become productive members of society.

Mr. Speaker, I have many friends in the NWT, and we have seen the GNWT slide non-priority people into public service employment with ease, while Priority 1 candidates are busy jumping through hoops and running into obstacles.

Mr. Speaker, when most people retire from the GNWT, they know that they have spent their last day on the job, but when some senior managers retire, they are put on contract, and they will be making just as much, if not more, money before retirement. Meanwhile, they tie up salary dollars that could be used to hire some Northerners. Mr. Speaker, I have been fighting for Priority 1 candidates in this government, but, without support from the highest level and without a human resource plan to actively work on increasing Priority 1 candidates, we will remain the same and half of our citizens will continue to live in a territory where the public service is not representative of the population they serve. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nahendeh.

Cuts to the Deh Cho Divisional Education Council
Members' Statements

June 1st, 2018

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, about a month ago, I was informed about upcoming reductions to the school support staff for the next year in the Nahendeh riding.

Mr. Speaker, we are seeing an increase in the number of students who have complex needs. According to the information provided to me, we are above average compared to other regions. Unfortunately, the resources that the DDEC receives from the department do not recognize this fact. This is a huge concern for parents, DEA members, students, and myself.

In the Deh Cho region proper, we have nine schools spread out over eight communities. Some of our schools have small student populations. This provides the DDEC with challenges to provide the support that the other regions enjoy. When you look at the requirements, you need a teacher, a language specialist, and/or a classroom assistant.

To the department's credit, we have seen a program support teacher in each community. Unfortunately, this becomes unrealistic for our smaller communities. The DDEC has come up with a plan to combine a number of half-time positions into a travelling position for some of the smaller communities. This is a good step; however, this means each of the smaller communities only gets service one week per month.

This year, we are seeing a reduction to the DDEC. This means that the support staff in schools are being cut or reduced to part-time. I personally disagree with these cuts. These cuts will have a huge impact on wellness of the staff and students.

In some of the smaller communities, we are putting the teachers in an unsafe environment. Part of the day will see teachers being the only adult in the school with the students. Safety becomes a concern. What happens when a student gets hurt? What about the other students? Without proper support staff in place, the teachers end up supervising the students during the breaks all of the time. We could see teachers spending more time managing their class instead of teaching.

Mr. Speaker, the formula looks at the number of students in the region instead of the school's population individually. This ends up affecting the larger schools. I am happy that the department is recognizing the importance of paying the teachers at the level that they are on the pay grid. Unfortunately, it is not the same for superintendent, finance, and administration staff, who are UNW personnel. They are paid at the mid-point, but that doesn't take into account the staff that are long-term. Because of this, the DDEC has to come up with the difference. This means cuts to other staff and programs.

Due to this fact and students' enrolment, the divisional office has seen a reduction of staff from 14 to 8 staff since 2007. These are our support system for teachers and students.

Cuts to the Deh Cho Divisional Education Council
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Member for Nahendeh, your time for Member's statement has expired.

Cuts to the Deh Cho Divisional Education Council
Members' Statements

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I seek unanimous consent to conclude my statement.

---Unanimous consent granted

Cuts to the Deh Cho Divisional Education Council
Members' Statements

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the department needs to look at the Dehcho Divisional Education Council funding allotment, and how we are looking after the NWT's most important resource: our youth. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I will have questions for the Minister later on today.

Cuts to the Deh Cho Divisional Education Council
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Hay River North.

Mental Health Supports
Members' Statements

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker the upcoming legalization of cannabis has sparked a lot of discussion about addictions and addictions treatment. That is not surprising, given our staggering rates of substance abuse in the NWT and the fact that many of us either see or feel the effects of addictions on a regular basis.

However, we must recognize that, while addiction is a problem, it is also a symptom of an underlying issue. If an individual feels a need to escape reality through drugs or alcohol on such a regular basis that he or she develops an addiction, there is a reason behind that need. There is something else driving that need.

Unfortunately, those driving forces, the mental health issues that lead to addiction, are often hidden. However, the impacts of mental health issues can be very real. Addiction is just one potential outcome. Suicide is another, as many Northerners know all too well. Even when the impacts are not this extreme, they can still be debilitating, life-altering, and affect people's emotional, physical, and economic well-being. Mental health issues can prevent people from holding a job, from maintaining adequate housing, and from having healthy relationships.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to think that this isn't news to people. I would like to think that everyone here is well-aware of these facts. However, the mental health supports available to the people of the NWT, and Hay River in particular, make me think otherwise. The government often pays lip service to mental health issues and produces many frameworks, strategies, and action plans with the best of intentions, but since I have been in office, I have seen little come from these efforts in terms of what is happening on the ground in Hay River. The wait list for community counselling in Hay River is still months long. They simply don't have the resources to keep up with the demand, meaning that many of the people who need treatment never end up receiving it. What happens to those people? Many trudge on and make it through each day, suffering quietly. Others may see their symptoms worsen and develop into a substance abuse problem, at which point the GNWT will step in to help.

Well, Mr. Speaker, I would like to see this government become more proactive and less reactive, so they are not forced to react to situations that could have been avoided in the first place. I would like to see this government pay the same heed to the state of our human infrastructure as it does to our capital infrastructure. I will have questions for the Minister of Health at the appropriate time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Mental Health Supports
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Nunakput.

2018 Nunakput High School Graduates
Members' Statements

Page 4183

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Quyanainni, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I would like to acknowledge the high school graduating class from my riding in Nunakput.

Mr. Speaker, I am proud to have the 2018 graduating class from my hometown of Paulatuk and the communities of Tuktoyaktuk, Sachs Harbour, and Ulukhaktok. Mr. Speaker, I would like to congratulate the following 2018 graduates: Jasmin Keogak from Sachs Harbour, who is attending East Three Secondary School in Inuvik; Matt Chloe, Jacob Klengenberg, and Nadine Kuneluk from Helen Kalvak School in Ulukhaktok; Jerry Ruben Bennett, Heather Thrasher, Keara Ruben, and Curtis Kregnaktak from Angik School in Paulatuk; and Allysa Felix, Elishia Lugt, Breanna Wolki, Marcus Kimiksana, Brayden Teddy, and Lucas Emaghok-Felix from Mangilaluk School in Tuktoyaktuk.

Mr. Speaker, our youth have the potential to transform their lives and their communities for the better. It is my wish that they succeed in all of the things that they set out to do. Mr. Speaker, the North has many youths who are very gifted and intelligent. It is my hope that they discover and hone their unique talents and to always believe in themselves and their abilities, whatever path they decide to take. Mr. Speaker, I wish for them to never give up on their dreams, no matter how hard things seem. Pick yourselves up and finish well.

Mr. Speaker, we must give our youth the tools they need to succeed, as they will be the next generation of leadership in the Northwest Territories and around the globe. Colleagues, please join me in celebrating the 2018 graduating class of Nunakput region and across the Northwest Territories Quyanainni, Mr. Speaker.

---Applause

2018 Nunakput High School Graduates
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Deh Cho.

Indigenous Housing Policies and Land Leases
Members' Statements

Page 4183

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. [English translation not provided.]

Mr. Speaker, for example, the minimum annual lease rate increased to $840 in both territorial and Commissioner's lands, up from $150 and $600, or 560 per cent and 40 per cent respectively.

Mr. Speaker, during our February/March session, discussions in this House also centred on issues of land tenure, with the Department of Lands creating several positions to address equity leases. My colleagues and I raised a number of concerns regarding both the sticker shock of significant lease rate increases, as well as the location of positions to address land tenure issues.

[English translation not provided.] Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Indigenous Housing Policies and Land Leases
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recognition of Inuvik Twin Lakes Science Fair Award Recipients
Members' Statements

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I think it's important that, as an Assembly, we acknowledge our young people and their achievements across the Northwest Territories. We've heard a couple of Members talk about graduations that are going on across the NWT.

Today I would like to speak to a young lady who was at the Canada-Wide Science Fair in May, and she won a bronze medal. Her name is Tyra Cockney-Goose. She actually served as a Page in this Assembly a couple of years ago. Her project was sleep deprivation, and she actually experimented on herself. She found in the project she put forward that, because she was a high school student, she stayed up late and was studying, and she likes to procrastinate, so that caused her to lose some sleep. I thought that was a very good study that she did.

I would also like to acknowledge Kaylin Harder, who is a grade 9 student in Inuvik. She was also at the science fair in --- I'm not sure where it was held, but she was also at the science fair, and she won a scholarship for a month-long science camp this summer.

Speaking of the achievements of young people, tomorrow, in Inuvik, East Three Secondary School will be having their graduation. Members have spoken to it in this Assembly. I mean, we all want to acknowledge the accomplishments of our young people, so I would ask the Assembly to join me in congratulating Tyra and Kaylin and all the other young students across the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition of Inuvik Twin Lakes Science Fair Award Recipients
Members' Statements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Members' statements. Item 4, returns to oral questions. Item 5, recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Great Slave.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to welcome Mr. John Soderberg to the House today. Mr. Soderberg is on the board of directors representing the NWT Seniors' Society and a resident of the Great Slave riding. I would like to thank John for his service, and I appreciate the hard work that the society does on behalf of seniors and elders throughout the Northwest Territories. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Nunakput.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Herbert Nakimayak Nunakput

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I saw my friend Arlene Hache in the gallery, so I would like to welcome her. As well, my wife, Yvonne, who was sitting in here yesterday listening to the debate on Bill 6. It's good to see the interaction, and especially hearing about it later on at home. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Welcome, Yvonne.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Range Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Good morning, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize a Range Lake constituent, David Wasylciw. I'll keep trying. Also Ms. Arlene Hache, who is the Yellowknife representative for the NWT Status of Women Council. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Kam Lake.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to recognize my constituency assistant, Mr. Garrett Cochrane, who is in the gallery today. He's been helping me behind the scenes to be prepared for this sitting, and I couldn't do it without him. Thank you very much, Garrett.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Yellowknife North.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I, too, want to recognize Yellowknife North constituent Arlene Hache. Arlene is a well-known community builder and advocate for social change. I just want to say welcome to the House and thank you for being here. Thank you.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. Member for Sahtu.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I, too, would like to recognize Ms. Yvonne Nakimayak, originally from Norman Wells, and also Sarah Cleary, providing Slavey language interpretation. Mahsi.

Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery
Recognition Of Visitors In The Gallery

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Recognition of visitors in the gallery. If we missed anyone in the gallery, thanks for being here with us. It's always nice to have an audience as part of our proceedings. Masi. Item 6, acknowledgements. Member for Nahendeh.

Acknowledgement 11-18(3): Terry Jaffray - Retirement, 2017 Education Hall of Fame Inductee, and NWT Superintendents Association Leadership Award Recipient
Acknowledgements

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. After 31 years of teaching and serving the students of the Nahendeh and Dehcho region, I am saddened and happy at the same time to announce that, after this school year, Terry Jaffray will be retiring.

Terry worked at the Echo-Dene, Thomas Simpson Secondary, and Bompas Elementary Schools and at Dehcho Divisional Education Council. Terry was inducted into the 2017 Education Hall of Fame and received the NWT Superintendents Association Leadership Award.

Terry said she will miss being around people all day and working with the trustees at the council meetings. Thank you, Terry, for your hard work and dedication. I wish you the best in your retirement. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Acknowledgement 11-18(3): Terry Jaffray - Retirement, 2017 Education Hall of Fame Inductee, and NWT Superintendents Association Leadership Award Recipient
Acknowledgements

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Acknowledgements. Item 7, oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister of Health and Social Services. On this Intergenerational Day, I would like to see him put some words into action about seniors. In February I asked the Minister about the status of contracting a new provider for the Adult Day Program in Yellowknife. The Minister said, "I am hoping that we can get this contract out as quickly as possible, hopefully before the end of this fiscal year." Can the Minister provide us with an update? Thank you.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, as the Member knows, we did go out for an RFP. We did not have any interest in that RFP. In discussion with the Member during the last sitting, I indicated that we were going to reach out to some of the people who requested the proposal to find out why there was no interest in the proposal, and what we could do differently before we go out with a new proposal that might actually garner some interest. We did that work. We did hear from some proponents that, first off, the length of duration of the RFP was too short. They felt it needed to be longer so that they could put together a better package. There were concerns about some of the other smaller clauses within the RFP, and there was a larger concern about the actual duration of the contract.

So we have made those amendments to the RFP. We are just doing the final tweaks as we speak, and we are hoping to have that RFP issued this month so that we can find a provider, a new provider, of the Adult Day Program here in Yellowknife as quickly as possible. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I'm not sure I understand all of the Minister's answers, so I would like him to clarify that the RFP is available as a thing to bid on for longer, and the term of the contract is available for longer? Has the money increased, as well? Those are my questions, Mr. Speaker.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

The RFP is going to be issued this month. We're going to run the RFP for a longer period of time, which hopefully allows people to develop more comprehensive proposals and have more time to assess their capacity to actually bid on the proposal. We, based on recommendations from individuals who did request the previous proposal, are extending the length of the contract, so that will make it more appealing, hopefully, according to some of the proponents.

We haven't issued the RFP. I've said we're going to issue the RFP this month, and hopefully we will see some solid proposals.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

I appreciate that clarification. I'm wondering if the Minister is going to go beyond "hopefully" and actually meet with people to ask them to bid on this contract. For example, there has been lots of discussion about how seniors and children in daycare can form a great partnership because they need, in some cases, similar services in a similar situation. So is there any kind of proactive work going on to attract bidders in that way?

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

After the Member's previous comments in the House when we discussed the RFP that was unsuccessful, I indicated that we would be reaching out to individuals to get their thoughts on how we could be more creative. A lot of that work has already been done. Once the RFP has been issued, I'm happy to have the department mail a copy of the RFP to anybody who is interested, and have conversations with anybody who has some creative ideas on how to move forward in a cooperative way in order to provide quality day programs for seniors in the Yellowknife area.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Masi, Mr. Speaker, and I appreciate the Minister's response. Is it possible for the Minister or his staff to be even more proactive than advertising and mailing the package out? It is possible for him or his staff to actively encourage people to apply so that we ensure that this time there are bidders on this proposal?

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, the department will be reaching out to potential proponents, like we did previously, to encourage them to apply and discuss with them options as we move forward, and I will certainly get the information out as best I can through tweets and other medium to encourage people to apply. Mr. Speaker, I want the same thing the Member wants. I want a day program in Yellowknife. We're going to do everything that we can. If we're unsuccessful with the RFP, I'll certainly be sitting down with the Member and other Yellowknife MLAs to discuss other possibilities. We're very hopeful that we'll find somebody who is interested in providing this important service, and we will continue to work until it happens. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 345-18(3): Adult Day Program
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, you heard today about some cuts that are potentially happening in the Deh Cho proper area and that and in regards to the formula. So my first question to the Minister of Education, Culture and Employment is: how was the formula developed to provide support for teachers and students in this regard? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Education, Culture and Employment.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. So, school funding is mostly funded under a formula based on number of children in the schools. They did do some work on the inclusive schooling funding in 2016. That work had input from research professionals from the different regions, also nationally recognized experts, both nationally and northern. So they were instrumental in providing guidance to the Department of Education, Culture and Employment on the renewal and the review of the formulas that were currently there. So, currently, it is based mostly on numbers of youth, though.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. However, when I go down south, for the students with complex needs, we see a different way of doing things, so why doesn't this government base its formula on the needs instead of just a formula on student population?

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

A needs-based formula, actually, was one of the questions that I was interested in, as well, when I took over this portfolio, but the explanation that I received made sense. So, there are a couple of problems. In the south, it is based on per capita for federal funding, and the number of people actually brings in more money, as well.

Within the Northwest Territories, we have another issue, so it's not only about number of people. The bigger issue is that we don't have the access to the amount of resources. If we based it on needs-based only, we would have to have the children diagnosed, and we don't have the resources at this point to be able to diagnose all of the children in the Northwest Territories. Not only do we not have that resource, but a lot of children don't show some of the symptoms of developmental delays early on, and so those are things sometimes that appear later on.

I should say, also, that many of the jurisdictions in the South that actually are needs-based are finding difficulty with that formula, as well, and so they're moving into a formula where they're looking at more classrooms broadly funded instead of strictly individual needs.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. I know in my riding, we are based on diagnosis. They have been identified. We have seven that I know of with autistics, you know, they've been identified as autistic. Parents are going out to schools or going down south to get educated because, right now, we, as a government, are not dealing with that. So I guess my next question to the Minister is: do you track how many students have student support programs in place in the Deh Cho, and is it above average compared to other regions? Because that's what I'm hearing.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

Yes, there is some evidence that says that we do have more difficulties within some of the smaller schools. The Deh Cho is one of the areas that was identified as a higher-than-average population base. I should say, though, that, yes, some of the children would be diagnosed as people who have autistic issues and such things, but some other issues are not easy to diagnose, such as FASD, with which sometimes the symptoms show many years later. So the inclusive funding is not only based on the children that have been diagnosed; it's based on the general population formula, which in my opinion, I think, is a more equitable formula at this point, until we can have more resources, so that every child can be diagnosed in an early intervention. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank the Minister for that answer. It disappoints me. We talk about our youth being our future. That is our resource, and this department is, "Well, we don't have the resources, so we have to do a formula." There's a need. There is a need. We have people diagnosed here, so will the Minister look into this further so we can come up with the right resources for our people? I'm talking about our youth.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Caroline Cochrane Range Lake

So, Mr. Speaker, I want to clarify again that the reason that it is not needs-based is because we don't have the resources to diagnose every child. The inclusive funding formula is based on the number of children in all schools so that children who do not have the ability to be diagnosed or aren't showing the symptoms yet to bring in a diagnosis are still accessing funding.

I do want to say that we are seeing large difficulties within small communities, so we need to look at small communities in themselves to see how we can actually support them better. So maybe the funding formula that is based on number of children is not adequate for small communities, where they don't have as many resources, but I don't think it should be needs-based. It should probably be community-based versus needs-based. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 346-18(3): Cuts to Deh Cho Divisional Educational Council
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur the President. My questions are for the Deputy Premier. I would like to follow up on the motion passed unanimously in this House on October 20, 2017, calling on our government to take action to protect the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Porcupine caribou herd. That motion directed the Premier to write the Prime Minister of Canada on these matters. I'm wondering whether that letter was sent, whether there was a reply, and can he give that correspondence to us and table it in the House? Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Deputy Premier.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Yes, thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the letter was sent as a result of that motion. The letter was sent on December the 19th to the Prime Minister from our Premier. I'm not sure of the response, yet. I will follow up on that, and, at the appropriate time, I'm confident that the Premier will table those letters.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I'd like to thank the Deputy Premier for that, and, if he could provide the correspondence in advance of tabling, that would be really helpful. On April 20th, the United States Bureau of Land Management opened a public comment period on oil and gas exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, and the deadline is June 19th for that. So can the Deputy Premier tell us whether GNWT will be making a written submission to the Bureau of Land Management on this matter and what that submission might look like?

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Yes, Mr. Speaker, we are currently preparing a technical submission to the environmental impact statement scoping process, which I will submit as Minister of ENR before the deadline of June 19th. I'm not exactly sure the contents of the technical submission, but I can follow up on that.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

I want to thank the Deputy Premier again for that. I would like to encourage him to publicly release that submission here in the Northwest Territories.

The October 2017 motion on protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge called on our government to support and assist Gwich'in and other governments in their efforts. Can the Deputy Premier describe what efforts GNWT has made to support and assist other governments protecting the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, which is, of course, the calving grounds for the Porcupine caribou herd?

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

GNWT has been one of the parties to the Porcupine Caribou Management Agreement. We have been working very closely with our counterparts in the Yukon and the Gwich'in. The Yukon actually hosted a Porcupine caribou summit of the parties on January 31, 2018. As Minister of ENR, I hosted a follow-up to the Porcupine caribou summit in Inuvik on April 6th and 7th, and based on these meetings, a technical workshop was held in Whitehorse in May to coordinate a science assessment of the potential impacts of development on the Porcupine caribou calving grounds. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker. I want to thank the Deputy Premier for that response. It sounds like our government is actually following through on that, and that is a great thing.

While we are on the subject of protecting caribou calving grounds, does our government actually have a policy position on resource development in other caribou calving grounds, and what are we doing to protect them?

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

I was waiting for that. I was waiting for that. Well, this is a herd that is extremely important to the people in the Western Arctic and in the Yukon and Alaska. When we do our work on some of our own projects, all of the best science will go into it. We will obviously take the preservation of any species into consideration. The issue that we are faced with here with the Porcupine caribou herd is that we are dealing with an administration in Washington. That will open up to the wild west without much thought given to the preservation of the caribou herd.

This is a very passionate issue for the people of the Western Arctic, in the Yukon, and in Alberta. For a lot of these people, it is a hill that they will die on. It is something that is very important to them. As far as our policy, we will do all of our scientific work when we have projects, and some of that work that we do will go into the decision-making process. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 347-18(3): Arctic National Wildlife Refuge
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, today, I made a Member's statement on public service. Going through the annual report, I have questions for the Minister of Finance. I would like to ask the Minister if all of the Ministers have looked at the Priority 1 numbers in the various departments. Thank you.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Finance.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, we have Priority 1 as our priority within the Government of the Northwest Territories, and we follow those numbers very closely. As you are able to see in the report that we released a little while ago, I believe that our Priority 1 candidates were quite high, and actually, the Priority 1 women candidates were a lot higher than the men.

We are aware of those numbers, and we continue to monitor them. We are developing a GNWT-wide resource plan with the departmental implementation plans as well. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

The Priority 1 candidates have hardly increased for 10 years. I would like to ask the Minister if anything is actively being done to increase the number of Priority 1 candidates in the GNWT.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

As I said, we are developing a GNWT-wide human resource plan with the departmental implementation plans. We expect that work to be done over the summer. As far as trying to increase the numbers, obviously, we want to see those numbers go up, and I have always been a firm believer that, based on merit, those numbers will go up.

I think the Member and I are both from an era where it was harder for P1 candidates to get into the government system, and maybe the numbers have not gone up much in the last 10 years, but I think the numbers are quite high, and I think they are continuing to improve, and they will continue to improve. As we see our younger people graduating and going off to university, getting the knowledge from there and bringing it back and working in the communities, I think we will see those numbers continue to rise.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

I think part of the increasing numbers at the graduation level to give their parents jobs.

Mr. Speaker, can the Minister tell me if direction was given specifically department by department on the development of human resource plans?

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

As I said, we are working on a GNWT-wide plan. As far as specific directions given to each individual department, I would have to follow up with the Department of HR, but the government knows, and we also recognize the fact that we want to see more P1 candidates. We are starting to see a lot of P1 candidates that are moving into positions based on merit and what they bring to the job. We will continue to work on that.

I had the opportunity just a couple of months ago to take part in a workshop that was actually being sponsored by ENR. It was an Indigenous women's workshop. What they did was they brought in a lot of Indigenous females from across the Northwest Territories that work within ENR, and I spoke at that. The first thing I said is, "I am excited about all of the potential I see in this room." We will see a lot of those girls that were there moving through the system based on what they bring to the position.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. That is certainly not what I am seeing in the GNWT, and I have been around for over 40 years, in the GNWT, not just been around, period. Mr. Speaker, I would like to ask the Minister if the department is developing a plan that the departments are working on, a plan that advances Indigenous people in the GNWT. I have found that the most effective method was to have managers and directors that were from the Northwest Territories, whether they be Priority 1 or priority candidates, and they seem to be able to attract and retain people from the Northwest Territories to work in the public service.

I would like to ask if there is an actual plan to developing Indigenous employees for advancement in the GNWT. Thank you.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

There are a couple of programs. A new gateway program is being rolled out to support more training positions within the GNWT, a regional recruitment program to provide opportunities for residents not quite meeting job requirements to develop into positions.

We have our summer students that we hire every year, and about 58 per cent of those are Indigenous. We changed the intern program so that we could end up doubling the number of interns, so that northern students have the opportunities to gain experience and hopefully become permanent employees. The Indigenous management program is being revised to better support more Indigenous people to move into management positions.

There are a number of initiatives on the go. As we prepare for our fall session, I would be more than pleased to have the department put a briefing together that we can provide to committee and answer any questions that they may have. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 348-18(3): Affirmative Action Policy and Human Resource Planning
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I am very concerned about the ongoing power increases that are affecting my constituents. I see the Taltson hydro expansion as a potential for resolving this situation as a transformative piece of infrastructure. I would like to ask the Minister of Infrastructure what his vision for hydroelectricity is in the Northwest Territories. Is this just something we would like to have or is this something we are going to have and put the resources behind to make it a reality? Thank you.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Based on some of the Member's statements today, I would gladly answer this question. Hydro generation is definitely the future of the Northwest Territories. It has to be. We have to meet our greenhouse gas emissions, our commitments to the pan-Canadian framework, our international commitments. One of the only ways we are going to be able to do that in the Northwest Territories is through the expansion of hydro projects.

We have renewables coming. We have our bilaterals that we have signed with the federal government to help us move forward; our other energy initiatives under our 2030 plan around windmills; LNG expansion; transmission line expansion; solar expansion. Some of these are costly. We are in remote communities. We are spread over a vast, large territory.

The expansion of the Taltson project will help us displace diesel generation in our territory. It is going to help us bring in revenues that we can use to offset the high cost of living in some of these other communities and do projects that we want to do up there as new technology expands. We will continue to work with the federal government to secure funding to expand the Taltson project.

At the same time, as we have talked in this House lately around the money we are going to use initially, we want to be able to find the potential market, figure out our capital costs, figure out the transmission line routing, and finalize our business case going forward.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

I don't often agree with the Minister, but in this case, I do. To ensure that we have buy-in from all of our residents, is the Minister going to be consulting with impacted Indigenous nations on the expansion so we don't get it held up in the regulatory process when it needs to move along?

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

I have been asked this question previously in the House by the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh. I have committed that I will be reaching out to all the affected groups that want to partner with us on this project and have discussions around the expansion of the Taltson. We will be wanting to be doing that sooner than later. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you to the Minister for that commitment. I want to know if he is going to reach out to private sector, as well. We have relied on P3 projects for many of our major infrastructure. Many years ago, there was a proposal from ATCO to do this work of connecting the grid north to south. Is the Minister going to reach out to ATCO or to other private sector power provider to make use of their capital to get this project off the ground sooner?

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

As I have said, with this initial funding, we want to find out the potential market, our capital costs, our transmission-line routing, and this stuff, and we finalized our business case. This is a large, transformative type of project that is going to take a lot of partners to do this, not just us, along with the Aboriginal governments. We are going to need assistance from the private sector, maybe investment from the private sector, to help us accomplish this.

I have had discussions myself, personally, with a lot of individual electrical companies that want to have an opportunity to be able to participate in projects in the Northwest Territories, not just the Taltson but also transmission lines, possibly our community power generation; we are looking at adding in our energy strategy. We are open to talking to anybody how we can move some of these projects forward.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Kam Lake.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Has the Minister reached out to our neighbouring provinces, as well, talked to the provincial governments about offsetting their greenhouse gas emissions with a potential hydro expansion here so it is not just us but we can make this a nation-building project? Thank you.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Yes, we have reached out to Saskatchewan and Alberta. We have had initial discussions with them. They are ongoing to look into the possibility of doing this. As I have said, with the money we have allocated towards the budget going forward here and being able to build our business case, we will continue to have those conversations with them as all provinces and territories look how they are going to reduce greenhouse gas emissions across this country. A number of provinces are trying to get off of coal. I think we are in a position where we can help them as long as the business case makes sense. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 349-18(3): Taltson Hydro Expansion
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Deh Cho.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my questions are for the Minister of Lands. Recently, we had a tour of the Deh Cho. The Minister of Lands accompanied me on a tour of the Deh Cho riding, and he heard many concerns. One of the concerns regards land leases. As we all might know, currently, there are negotiations between the Dehcho First Nations, the Government of the Northwest Territories, and the federal government. First Nations are certainly entitled to their traditional lands. Of course, governments, their approach is to try to maintain the public interest of all residents of the NWT.

Now, with land leases, the way that I explained it in my language is that it is borrowed land. "Nde Goniit'o," that is what we are living on in most communities. We have to pay government for living on those lands. Such is the predicament that we all live in here, in the NWT, as opposed to outright ownership of lands, where a person could buy a house and put that house on a piece of land.

My question is to the Minister of Lands. Can the Minister outline the barriers for making residential leases available in the Deh Cho? Mahsi.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Lands.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Of course, residents can apply for a lease at any time. There is a process which is followed. The department will work with the community to ensure the application is in accordance with development plans. We invite people who are interested in acquiring residential leases to contact the department for information on the application process or for assistance in making their application.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

The process is very clear. Has the Department of Lands received feedback from leaseholders on the fee changes, and what is the Minister doing to address those concerns?

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

We have received feedback on the increases. I would have to say that the support for the increases was not universal. However, we still do feel they are fair because we wanted to bring the two land regimes, if I can put it that way, into alignment. It is also important to remember, I was surprised to find this, that there were quite a few territorial leases within the community. There were quite a few residential leases on territorial lands in communities. It is particularly important, in my submission, that there be alignment between the two amounts that are paid on leases. Yes, particularly those on territorial lands, there was a significant increase. No, not everybody was happy.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Can the Minister provide an update on whether the land specialist positions have been filled and whether work on equity leases has started?

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Yes, we are working on this important project. Office space has been identified. I understand that the staffing process will be underway this month. Members will recall that initially, there were to be three positions. We increased the number to five as this is a particularly important matter that we all wish to resolve.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Deh Cho.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Michael Nadli Deh Cho

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, my last question is solutions. I know the Department of Lands is reviewing the matter of land leases. Possibly, maybe the Minister could commit to the idea of looking at the land designation for First Nations so that they still could retain some measure of at least being First Nations within Canada, at the same time meeting the needs and interests of people who want to have land for residential purposes. Would the Minister commit to perhaps considering the idea of a different and unique land designation for the NWT?

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

That is a very complex question, and I'm not sure of all the ramifications. I would have to discuss that with my fellow Cabinet Ministers. I would certainly be prepared to have further conversations with the Member opposite, or, if he wants to put this suggestion, which I'm not sure I fully understand, into writing, we could at least consider it. Thank you.

Question 350-18(3): Land Leases Limiting Housing
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, earlier today I talked about the cost of living, in particular as it related to seniors. My questions today are for the Minister of Finance. In recent years, we've seen various fees that have increased. I would like to ask the Minister: is the government's fiscal strategy to save $150 million over the life of this Assembly still in place? Is it still a thing? Is it still under way? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Finance.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, that has actually gone so well, we've decided to double it.

---Laughter

No, Mr. Speaker. When we came into the 18th Legislative Assembly, we had a goal of $150 million. Because of a lot of back and forth between ourselves and committee and listening to what the public had to say, we were able to come up with just over, I believe, $100 million, and as tough a decision as it was, I think it's actually positioned us very well to invest in some of the infrastructure projects and match some of the money from Canada, our 25 cents on the dollar. I think the commitment I made at the time was that this was something that we were going to do over the first two years of this Assembly, so I believe I have met that commitment, and the anticipation is we're not looking at making any more reductions, although there will be some residual reductions based on the decisions that were made in years 1 and 2. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

It is Friday, so I guess it could be considered joke day today, as well. I appreciate the Minister's reply, but the Minister just indicated that this was a two-year undertaking. I guess the next question is, you know, there have been various fees and taxes that have had significant impact on the cost of living recently. When can residents see these increases halted? The government ones are the ones that I'm talking about. The two-year plan is done. These fees and these ongoing increases, is that it? Can we see a reprieve, now? Are they going to be halted?

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The Member is right. There were some increases as a result of some of the exercises that we went through, and some of those had to be made. They hadn't been increased for a long time. Some fees are legislated, that are reviewed every five years, so those are going to happen regardless. We tried to keep the effects to the people of the Northwest Territories to a minimum, and that is what we'll continue to try to do.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Again, I appreciate the reply. It's good that we can try to make the effort to reduce these fees. I do want to remind the government that, while they are making sure that their revenues are up, it is having a major effect on the cost of living of our northern residents, so we need to be mindful of that. I guess, then, the big question that is still outstanding is that there was lots of talk in the last session about a land transfer tax, and there is still some uncertainty around that. Simply, Northerners want to know: is it coming?

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The Member is absolutely correct. This was an initiative that was brought forward by the Department of Justice as part of their contribution to the exercise we went through. There has been some opposition to this, not only from Regular Members, but from members of the public. So I don't think we've landed on a decision on this yet. We'll continue to have that conversation. I have informed the department that, if they want to try to pull this one off the table, they will have to put something else on the table to meet their contribution to the exercise that we went through.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Yellowknife North.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Cory Vanthuyne Yellowknife North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Well, then, I guess the question of whether there are future fees to be expected has not ended. I mean, it seems to me that, if we're going to potentially take the land transfer tax one off the table, and that would be welcomed, there is a directive in place, apparently, to make sure that it's going to be made up somewhere else. Is that actually the case, or can people expect in the future here to see continued tax increases or fee increases of some kind to help the government meet their fiscal strategy? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

The Member did mention that this was Friday. We're working with the department to see what we can do. Of course, we have to listen to some of the concerns that were raised by Regular Members, and we do that all the time, you know that, and some concerns that were raised by members of the public. So we take that into consideration. Like I said, we haven't landed on a final decision yet. Of course, we will keep committee apprised as to our discussions. We will continue to have discussions internally.

As far as the other thing the Member spoke about, the fiscal situation, I believe the decisions that we've made, as tough as some of them may have been, have put us in a position that we had to absorb a couple of hits, obviously, in the first year with the $34 million reduction in the money from the federal government, then last year with the money in the corporate taxes, the contribution going down. So I think we've positioned ourselves well to absorb those, as well as make our 25 per cent contribution to a lot of infrastructure projects. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 351-18(3): Fee Increases and Land Transfer Tax
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I have questions for the Minister of Health. Earlier, I mentioned the challenges faced by residents of Hay River who want to access mental healthcare. Long waits and difficulty booking appointments at the medical clinic are a common topic of discussion in Hay River; however, difficulty accessing mental healthcare in Hay River is not something people talk about as openly, because there is still a stigma surrounding it. However, I assure you that accessing treatment is a problem in Hay River, and a serious one. I have brought it up in this House before. I brought it up in committee, and I brought it up directly to the Minister of Health.

In 2016, the Department of Health released a Mental Healthcare Action Plan, followed by the Mental Health Strategic Framework, followed by the Child and Youth Mental Wellness Action Plan. As a result of these initiatives, I would like to ask the Minister: how has the GNWT improved access to mental health services, and the services themselves, in Hay River? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the department, the authority, the territorial authority, as well as the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority, have been listening to the Member, as well as to the residents of Hay River. I have confirmation that Hay River Health and Social Services continues to strive to improve the counselling services that they currently have. Right now, I can confirm that they have five full-time resident counsellors in place in Hay River. As of today, there is an approximate wait time of about eight weeks, which is quite a bit; however, there are no wait times for addictions counselling. The length of time on a wait list varies throughout the year. Factors that influence the wait times could include vacancies in the positions, urgency of the clients, matching client needs with the specialization of some of our staff.

As a note, Mr. Speaker, there are two scheduled emergency appointments per day, five days a week, for those clients who need emergency services in Hay River.

On top of that, Mr. Speaker, Hay River Health and Social Services ran an applied suicide intervention skills training course in Hay River from the 14th to 15th of February. They ran a mental health first aid program earlier in December; they are planning another one in August. This is an important tool that we can use to help educate residents and help them be informed, help break down the stigma that exists around mental health. I strongly encourage the Member to take it and to share all the information in that mental health first aid program with his constituents.

Lastly, Mr. Speaker, we are moving forward with the Youth Mental Health and Addictions Action Plan, which contemplates creating 49 new positions throughout the Northwest Territories. Hay River is part of that plan. Granted, it's towards the end of the four-year rollout, but it is part of that plan.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

I appreciate that answer. It's quite detailed. The Minister mentioned there's an eight-week waiting list, but then, once people get into counselling, it's still only once a month, maybe once every few weeks, which I believe is inadequate for most people. The Minister mentioned the child and youth mental health counsellors that will be put into schools. There are still some uncertainties surrounding that, how it's going to roll out in Hay River. Some of the questions are: when will we see this? How many counsellors will there be? Who will they work for, the authority or the health department? Where will they be located in the summer, et cetera? Could the Minister please provide some detail on this?

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, with respect to the plan, the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority will have four child and youth care counsellor positions, as well as one clinical supervisor. As the plan indicates, that won't be rolling out until 2021-2022, which is a ways off.

The counsellors will be employees of the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority, unless we have made progress to bring them into the authority, at which point they will be employees of the GNWT. The team that's been working on this has developed a job description for the travelling youth care counsellor positions, and I spoke to that earlier this week with the Minister from Nahendeh.

The goal is to find the right people, Mr. Speaker. The goal is to find the right people for the job, with the right mix of skills, competencies, to meet the needs that the youth are identifying, and to meet the requests of the youth to have really qualified people providing these supports. As we implement these positions, Mr. Speaker, across the Northwest Territories and we learn what's working and what's not working, this may change, and we may be able to evolve and continue to strengthen this model as we go.

I know the Member was concerned about registration with the Canadian Counselling and Psychotherapy Association. It's not a requirement for the travelling youth counsellors, and I understand that it hasn't actually been an issue with hiring people in Hay River, but, if the Member has an alternate opinion or information that I need to know, I'm happy to listen.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

I provided the Minister with an email earlier with more detail than I asked in the oral questions, so that's where that came from, but I appreciate the answer. Like all things health, the fact that the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority is outside of the Territorial authority affects the GNWTs ability to provide quality mental health care services to the residents in Hay River. I'd like to ask the Minister: with those commitments made in this House to get the ball rolling on getting the health authority in Hay River into the territorial authority, what progress has been made to that end?

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

I agree with what the Member is saying. We need to bring the Hay River Health and Social Services Authority into the territorial authority so we can provide comprehensive, seamless services to residents of Hay River, Enterprise, K'atlodeeche, and the surrounding areas. We need to be able to know that our residents, regardless of where they are coming from, whether it's from the Deh Cho or other regions, are receiving seamless services through a territorially funded health system.

We have been working with the Department of Finance to begin the discussions about what the ultimate costs will be for the pension transfer. We need to have that information before we can take our next steps, which would include negotiations and discussions with the Union of Northern Workers, because the employees in Hay River, although they are new NWT employees, they are under a separate collective agreement completely.

There is a lot of work that needs to be done. It is a mandate of this Assembly. I continue to push it at the Cabinet table, recognizing that there are significant long-term benefits of doing this from a client perspective, but, also, from a financial perspective, we wouldn't necessarily have to come forward every year with a top-up for the existing pension. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Hay River North.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and further to my last question, I know it's complex, and I know that bringing the Hay River authority into the territorial authority probably won't happen until after these negotiations are complete. I was wondering, does the Minster have any sort of timeline that he thinks he could share with us about how long it would take to make this work well? Because I know it is a complex issue. Best case scenario, would it be five years? Would it be two years? Could the Minister give us a little bit of insight?

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

Page 4183

Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I wish I could give the Member a concrete answer on this one. I really do. This is something we know we need to do, but the bottom line is I think getting the work done around the pension would probably take a couple of years to do that. Once we do that, then we have to begin our negotiations with the union, and frankly I cannot guesstimate or estimate how long the negotiations would take with the union. It is something we want to get done. It is something we are moving forward towards. As I learn more, I promise the Members from Hay River that I will certainly keep them in the loop and informed. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 352-18(3): Mental Health care
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Mackenzie Delta.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I brought this issue up a couple of days back, the ferry services for Tsiigehtchic. Mr. Speaker, the ferry started operating on Wednesday, but, as of this moment, residents in Tsiigehtchic still don't have service. I would like to ask the Minister: when will the ferries start taking traffic for the community of Tsiigehtchic? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Infrastructure.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Wally Schumann Hay River South

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to update the House on the Tsiigehtchic ferry service, as well. The Member is correct. We are currently servicing the Inuvik to McPherson route. We had staff out there yesterday, working on the ferry landing on the Tsiigehtchic side of things. They cleared off some ice. They moved some dried gravel down there to help with the landing, and the ferry tried last night to land there, and there were some issues around it. My understanding is, as of today's update that I've got on it, later today we are going try successfully, hopefully, to be able to service the community of Tsiigehtchic maybe tonight.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, in the past, the department had the community maintaining the ferry landings, and everything worked well. As soon as the ferry was in the water, the landings were done, and even this spring the community stepped up and removed the big mountain of ice that was on the ferry landing. Will the Minister direct his department to go back to the way things used to be and have the community maintain the landing?

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Wally Schumann Hay River South

I'm not going to commit to that in the House. I will have a conversation with our superintendent in the region and ask if there are best practices that we can be learning from this going forward. If there's a benefit to having the community look after the landing, maybe, possibly next season, maybe that's an opportunity.

One thing I want to make quite clear on this ferry this year, I want to congratulation our staff, in particular of Infrastructure, for all of the hard work they've done. We've installed four new engines on this thing. They're up and running well. Transport Canada gladly gave us a certificate to operate this ferry before final inspection because of the great work that the department has done.

I would also like to update Members of the House that this service is actually in almost a week early compared to most seasons. Now, is that due to climate change and such? We're not quite aware of that. I am not a scientist, but this is definitely a week early, so I commend the staff for all the great work they've done, and thank you to the community of Tsiigehtchic for trying to help out to help get this service up and running because it's in the best interests of everybody that we get this thing running sooner than later. There's the Department of Health, the Department of Justice, and the residents in the region.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Frederick Blake Jr. Mackenzie Delta

Mr. Speaker, yes the staff did a wonderful job on installing the ferries this year. I'm not questioning that. The only question I have is: will the Minster, over the next few months, work with me and the community to come up with some agreement to do the landings in the community as it was even a couple of years back? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, as I said, I will talk to my superintendent, and we'll make sure that the Member from the region is in the loop, and we'll have those discussions and see what we can do moving forward. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 353-18(3): Tsiigehtchic Ferry Landing
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Sahtu.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. My question here today is for the Minster of Health, on dialysis services. We have a new building that is very welcome by the community in Normal Wells, providing services to the community and the surrounding communities, a very, well, state-of-the-art building, I must add. We had several tours there, and I heard complimentary feedback from the general public. However, there is a lack in service for dialysis treatment.

Will the Minister elaborate if there are any plans on providing dialysis services to the residents of the Sahtu from the facility in Norman Wells?

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Dialysis is a very complex process, requiring some very complex machinery and highly-trained individuals who actually know how to operate the machines, as well as to clean the machines, which require a significant cleaning between use to ensure that there is no cross-contamination. It isn't as simple as putting in a machine and putting in a nurse. You need to have a significant amount of backup staff. If you are going to offer it in a facility, you need to make sure that you have enough staff complement so that if somebody is sick, there is a proper backfill. Otherwise, it could be an individual or a client at risk of harm or worse.

Mr. Speaker, we are focused on providing supports to our residents regardless of where they live. We are continuing to explore how we can work with Alberta to expand peritoneal dialysis, which could be done in homes where the individual's particular condition will allow.

I hear the Member. I hear the Member's desire, but we are not in a position to put a dialysis machine and a dialysis service in the new health centre at this time.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thanks to the Minister for that. That clears the air on concerns and residents that I know of that have that illness. Will the Minister look at providing an options paper on moving forward when this could be done, if any?

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Since we have moved to a single authority, we have a lot of opportunities to really dig into the system to see how things are working and to have a larger perspective or larger vision of how we want to move forward.

One of the things that we clearly need to do is primary care reform. This is something that needs to be done at a territorial level, and it has to look at all of the types of programs and services that are being delivered in all areas of the Northwest Territories. Things like dialysis, midwifery, and other things are certainly part of this overarching primary care review, as well as just how we provide our services at the front line.

I am not going to commit to doing a specific review on dialysis in the Sahtu, but I will commit to the Member that we are working on making improvements to the system through a primary care approach which will benefit on all residents and will focus on the clients rather than the system.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Daniel McNeely Sahtu

Thanks to the Minister for that reply here. I look forward to working with the department to develop a methodology or a model to see if that service could be provided from the facility in Norman Wells, the costs of the equipment, the costs of training, the costs of personnel, have that modelled so it's on paper, not to say that we're going to do it, but just to educate ourselves whether that service can be provided at some point in time for discussion purposes.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Just the other day, I was asked questions about expanding one shift in Hay River for the dialysis services that were there, recognizing that will require additional staff and additional backup. We have some early numbers on that, and adding a shift could be as much as $600,000.

When you think about providing dialysis services in a community like Norman Wells, it would require a number of machines, because you can't have one; you have to have a backup machine, even if you don't use it. You have to have adequate numbers of staff. We are talking hundreds of thousands of dollars a year to deliver a program where the cost-benefit of that may not be there.

I'm not saying that the population of the Northwest Territories isn't going to grow and we won't get there, but as a system that is running a $90 million accumulated deficit, we have to think carefully about how we are investing our money, and we need to know that that money is supporting the healthcare of our residents and that we are getting best value for money. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 354-18(3): Dialysis Services
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Early in the week, I was asking questions to the Minister of Finance about taxation in Fort Liard and that.

Some of the questions that we heard during my visits into the communities were in regard to when you turn 65, you have the opportunity to have the taxes waived. I guess the first question to the Minister is: how does the department actually inform people, when they turn 65, that their taxation is going to be waived? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister of Finance.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, the Member is right. There is a program, Senior Citizens' and Disabled Persons' Property Tax Relief. It is a program that the Department of Municipal and Community Affairs has promoted to NWT residents through government services offices, community government offices, the MACA website, MACA regional offices, as well as through the NWT Housing Corporation. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. Can the Minister advise if the finance department actually sends out a letter to the resident as soon as they turn 65 that this benefit is available?

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

I am not sure if we actually send them a letter. I would have to follow up and see if we do. If we don't, then it is application-based, so people know that once they turn 65 and they are eligible for this, then they must submit an application to MACA and, my understanding is, submit an application to MACA annually to receive the benefit.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

I thank the Minister for that answer. Can the Minister of Finance make a commitment to work with the Minister of MACA to get this information out? I understand it is application-based, but I think we need to get this information out to our elders and, if we can, get the department to send a letter to them so that we can actually make sure our elders get this benefit.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

I will work with the Minister of Municipal and Community Affairs. As well, I think the most important part here is working with the community governments, because they are the ones that actually know their community the best, and they know who may be eligible or who might be coming up soon.

If we are able to send them a package that they can share with the members in their community, I think it will carry a lot more weight coming from the community. The government service officers do great work in the communities, and they should be a conduit for getting that information out to the elders of the community.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Oral questions. Member for Nahendeh.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Shane Thompson Nahendeh

Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I thank the Minister for that. I have to agree with you. The government services officers do a great job in my riding, and I believe they do a great job in everybody else's ridings. I know that people do work that way, but, again, it's just about getting that information out there.

The other problem is when elders don't find out about it. I have had one elder who was 70 years old when she finally found out about it and asked the question: is this program retroactive, and if it isn't, why not? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

My understanding is this is not retroactive. Again, maybe we need to make sure that the information is out there so that people are aware that, as soon as they turn 65, they are eligible for this particular program, but the quick answer to the Member's question is no, it's not retroactive. It's based on applications that they submit to the department every year. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The time for oral questions has expired. At this time, I would like to call for a short break. Masi.

---SHORT RECESS

Question 355-18(3): Seniors' Tax Benefit
Oral Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Okay, Members, we left off from the oral questions. Next item, item 8, written questions. Member for Frame Lake.

Written question 12-18(3): Ekati Mine Layoffs
Written Questions

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Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. My question is for the Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment, who has responsibility for the socio-economic benefits of mining. The potential layoffs by Dominion Diamond of 150 unionized workers at the Ekati Mine raises serious issues regarding the costs and lost revenues to the GNWT and economic impacts of such layoffs. Can the Minister describe the steps taken by GNWT to deal with the mass layoffs of workers, and:

  1. Does the GNWT have information about worker absenteeism at the Ekati Mine and its impact on the operations of the Ekati Mine?
  2. What costs will be incurred for re-training, unemployment, and income assistance supports that may be required?
  3. Provide an estimate of the loss of tax revenue (including personal income tax, payroll tax, and transfer payment) and any other GNWT revenue as a result of the loss of 150 jobs.
  4. Provide an estimate of the economic impact from the loss of 150 jobs in local gross domestic product expenditures, including purchases of regional transportation and expediting services.

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

Written question 12-18(3): Ekati Mine Layoffs
Written Questions

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Written questions. Item 9, returns to written questions. Item 10, replies to Commissioner's opening address. Item 11, petitions. Item 12, reports of standing and special committees. Item 13, reports of committees on the review of bills. Item 14, tabling of documents. Minister of Health and Social Services.

Tabled Document 209-18(3): Government of the Northwest Territories Response to Committee Report 4-18(3): Report on Adult Residential Addictions Treatment Facilities Tour 2017
Tabling Of Documents

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Glen Abernethy Great Slave

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following document entitled "Government of the Northwest Territories Response to Committee Report 4-18(3): Report on Adult Residential Addiction Treatment Facilities Tour 2017." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 209-18(3): Government of the Northwest Territories Response to Committee Report 4-18(3): Report on Adult Residential Addictions Treatment Facilities Tour 2017
Tabling Of Documents

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Tabling of documents. Minister of Finance.

Tabled Document 210-18(3): Inter-activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018) Tabled Document 211-18(3): 2030 NWT Climate Change Strategic Framework
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following two documents entitled "Inter-activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018)" and the "2030 NWT Climate Change Strategic Framework." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 210-18(3): Inter-activity Transfers Exceeding $250,000 (April 1, 2017 to March 31, 2018) Tabled Document 211-18(3): 2030 NWT Climate Change Strategic Framework
Tabling Of Documents

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents. Minister of infrastructure.

Tabled Document 212-18(3): 2030 Energy Strategy: Energy Action Plan 2018-2021
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following document entitled "2030 Energy Strategy: Energy Action Plan 2018-2021." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 212-18(3): 2030 Energy Strategy: Energy Action Plan 2018-2021
Tabling Of Documents

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Minister responsible for the NWT Housing Corporation.

Tabled Document 213-18(3): 2018-2019 Consolidated Operating Budget - Northwest Territories Housing Corporation
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4183

Alfred Moses Inuvik Boot Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I wish to table the following document entitled "2018-2019 Consolidated Operating Budget - Northwest Territories Housing Corporation." Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Tabled Document 213-18(3): 2018-2019 Consolidated Operating Budget - Northwest Territories Housing Corporation
Tabling Of Documents

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Tabling of documents.

Tabled Document 214-18(3): Summary of Members' Absences for the period February 7, 2018 to May 23, 2018
Tabling Of Documents

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Pursuant to Section 5 of the Indemnities, Allowances and Expense Regulations of the Legislative Assemble and Executive Council Act, I wish to table the "Summary of Members' Absences for the Period February 7, 2018 to May 23, 2018.

Item 15, notices of motion. Item 16, notices of motion for first reading of bills. Item 17, motions. Member for Yellowknife Centre.

Motion 20-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 11, 2018
Motions

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Julie Green Yellowknife Centre

Mahsi, Mr. Speaker.

I MOVE, seconded by the honourable Member for Great Slave, that, notwithstanding Rule 4, when this House adjourns on June 1, 2018, it shall be adjourned until Thursday, October 11, 2018;

AND FURTHER, that, at any point prior to October 11, 2018 if the Speaker is satisfied after consultation with the Executive Council and Members of the Legislative Assembly that the public interest requires that the House should meet at an earlier time during the adjournment, the Speaker may give notice and thereupon the House shall meet at the time stated in such notice and shall transact its business as it has been duly adjourned to that time.

I would like to wish you and all my other colleagues a relaxing and safe summer break. Thank you.

Motion 20-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 11, 2018
Motions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Motion 20-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 11, 2018
Motions

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Motion 20-18(3): Extended Adjournment of the House to October 11, 2018
Motions

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour. All those opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Masi. Motions. Item 18, first reading of bills. Item 19, second reading of bills. Minister of Justice.

Bill 20: Ombudsperson Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the Honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 20, Ombudsperson Act, be read for the second time.

This bill provides for the appointment of an Ombudsperson as an officer of the Legislature. This bill establishes the mandate of the Ombudsperson, which will be to investigate complaints about the administrative fairness of government practices to promote fair, reasonable, and equitable government administration.

Some of the key matters addressed by this Bill include the following:

  • requiring that the Commissioner, on the recommendation of the Legislative Assembly, appoint an Ombudsperson;
  • conferring powers and duties on the Ombudsperson for the purpose of fulfilling the Ombudsperson's mandate;
  • setting out how complaints can be made by a person to the Ombudsperson;
  • setting out how investigations are to be conducted by the Ombudsperson.

Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 20: Ombudsperson Act
Second Reading Of Bills

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Motion is in order. To the principle of the bill.

Bill 20: Ombudsperson Act
Second Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 20: Ombudsperson Act
Second Reading Of Bills

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Motion carried.

---Carried

Bill 20 has had a second reading and is now referred to standing committee. Second reading of bills. Item 19, consideration in Committee of the Whole of bills and other matters: Minister's Statement 1-18(3), North Slave Correctional Complex Inmate Concerns; Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process; Committee Report 8-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories, with the Member for Hay River North in the chair.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

I now call Committee of the Whole to order. What is the wish of committee? Mr. Beaulieu.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, committee wishes to consider Minister's Statement 1-18(3), North Slave Correctional Complex Inmate Concerns, and Committee Report 8-18(3), Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. Does committee agree?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. We have agreed to consider Minister's Statement 1-18(3), North Slave Correctional Complex Inmate Concerns. I will open up to committee for comments or questions. Seeing none from committee, does committee concur that this concludes our consideration of Minister's Statement 1-18(3)?

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. Committee, we have next agreed to consider Committee Report 8-18(3), the Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts. I will go to the chair of the standing committee which considered the report, or which authored the report, for any opening comments. Mr. Testart.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Yesterday, the Standing Committee on Government Operations presented its Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories. The committee report included the eight recommendations, and I look forward to the opportunity to discuss the report and recommendations in Committee of the Whole today. Members of the committee may have individual comments. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. I will open the floor to any general comments on the report. Do we have general comments from the committee? Seeing none, we will move into the detail. As Members are aware, the recommendations in these reports are usually moved as motions. For those following along, the first recommendation can be found on page 8 of 21. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 66-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Support to Complete Year-end Report under the Financial Administration Act, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Office of the Comptroller General in the Department of Finance consider, and report back to the Standing Committee on Government Operations on, the utility of entering into service agreements or memoranda of understanding with GNWT boards, agencies, or other entities requiring support or assistance to complete their year-end financial reporting as required under the Financial Administration Act. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 66-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Support to Complete Year-end Report under the Financial Administration Act, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is being distributed. To the motion.

Committee Motion 66-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Support to Complete Year-end Report under the Financial Administration Act, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 66-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Support to Complete Year-end Report under the Financial Administration Act, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Thank you. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories considers bringing together all of its information about P3 projects under one note in the consolidated public accounts until such time as the new Canadian Public Sector Accounting Board standards on the accounting treatment of P3 projects are put in place. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. The motion is in order. To the motion. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. Currently, in the public accounts, P3 information is scattered across several schedules. In our discussions with the Auditor General, we understand that their recommendations were to move all of that P3 information into one note in the consolidated public accounts, and that would give easier access and understanding of what the GNWT's P3 commitments are and present the information clearly to interested members of the public.

It should be noted that Canadian Public Sector Accounting treatment of P3 projects is still in flux, and there has not been a consistent practice that has been developed. Many jurisdictions are struggling with this challenge of how to properly present on P3 projects in public accounts.

Despite the Auditor General's interest in this, they were willing to accept that the information was present in the public accounts, and the committee certainly isn't of the opinion that that information was not there. Committee's interest is in ensuring that all of the information is placed under one note so it is much easier to find and much easier to understand to someone who may be flipping through the public accounts and looking for P3 commitments. I hope that this motion passes, and the government will consider our recommendation. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. To the motion. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

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Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks, Mr. Chair. Yes, I support this recommendation. I was happy to sit in on the public accounts review. I am not a committee member, but this is, I think, one of their key recommendations. The current information about P3s is spread across four different parts of the public accounts. I want to give credit to the Comptroller General for improving the amount of information that is now disclosed about P3s.

Bringing that together in one place, as this recommendation is suggesting, I think, is certainly in the spirit of openness and transparency that our government has ascribed to, so I support this motion. Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. To the motion.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 67-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Treatment of P3 Projects in Consolidated Public Accounts, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories make GNWT's inventory of contaminated sites available online, modelled upon and with a level of disclosure comparable to the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory maintained by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is in order. To the motion. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks, Mr. Chair. I have had cause to use the Federal Contaminated Sites Inventory. It is a very detailed listing for individual waste sites, contaminated sites by department. You can see the status of the assessment and the remediation work that has been done on each of those sites over about a 10-year period and the remaining outstanding liability. It is a very good resource.

I would urge that our government move towards greater disclosure and transparency around these matters. I'm not saying we have to adopt the federal system right away, but it is something that we should be moving towards. I would urge the Minister of Finance to have a look at that website and see what's there.

We are going to inherit a number of these sites or at least management of these sites pursuant to the devolution agreement, and we need to get our house in order to make sure that we can properly assess the liabilities and make sure that the remediation takes place in a timely fashion. If you don't have that stuff together in one place as the federal government does, it can be awkward at best.

I support this motion. Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. To the motion.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 68-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Online Availability of Inventory of Contaminated Sites, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Government of the Northwest Territories, giving consideration to the observations made in this committee report, strive to improve upon the information and the Financial Statement Discussion and Analysis section of the public accounts that indicates how the GNWT has met the provisions of the Fiscal Responsibility Policy related to debt servicing and infrastructure of financing. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. The motion is in order. To the motion. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I do want to commend the Office of the Comptroller General for taking previous year's review seriously and bringing more detailed analysis of the Fiscal Responsibility Policy into the public accounts.

It is the committee's understanding that this information has not been available previously, and as it is the cornerstone of our government's fiscal policies or budgeting policies, committee feels very strongly that this information needs to be clearly presented to the public. Given that the responsibility policy is an accountability mechanism as much it is a limit on spending, it is imperative that we have clear accounting of it so that it is clear that the government is living up to its promises, commitments, and policies.

Where we feel that it can be improved is that much of the information was quite confusing to the committee on first read. When we were able to receive evidence from the Comptroller General around the Financial Statement Discussion and Analysis section, we were able to learn where those numbers come from and better understand them, but not everyone in the public has the benefit of sitting down with the Comptroller General.

The committee feels that, if we can find a way to clarify this and make the information in the facts and figures relatable, easy to find, and understandable, it will ultimately result in a more readable and consistent document and allow for the goals of accountability and transparency that are set out in the policy to be properly realized in the public accounts document.

I support this motion, and I hope others will as well. Thank you.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks, Mr. Chair. I, too, want to give credit to the Comptroller General to improving the presentation of information about compliance with the Fiscal Responsibility Policy.

Our research staff had a lot of difficulty trying to replicate or duplicate the set of calculations where information had been pulled from and so on, and that's what I think this recommendation is really about: making sure that the information about compliance is verifiable and reproducible by a third party, including the Standing Committee on Government Operations, but it's really about transparency and accountability.

I think the information is in the public accounts, but it's not set out in as clear as manner as it could be, to allow for anyone to verify that we are, indeed, in compliance with the policy. That's what the recommendation is aimed at, and I support it. Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. To the motion.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 69-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Improvement in Reporting on Debt Servicing and Infrastructure Financing, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommends that the Department of Finance give consideration to reporting student loan remissions in another schedule of the public accounts separate from the schedule reporting bad debt write-offs and forgiveness. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Thanks, Mr. Chair. Yes, this really springs from an issue that I've raised several times in this House about how the individual names and student loan remission amounts are listed in a schedule in the public accounts. I have characterized that as an unfair and undue invasion of privacy, and, in fact, the Privacy Commissioner herself has characterized it in the same way.

When the Commissioner appeared before the standing committee to present her last report, we asked the Commissioner about this, and she did provide us with copies of a couple of letters that she has sent to the Comptroller General on this subject. I just want to sort of highlight a few points, here, from this correspondence. She says that "the disclosure of the information in question, which pairs names with the amount of loans received and the amount of these loans for loan remissions and has resulted in a forgiveness of all or part of that debt, clearly amounts to a disclosure of personal information." She goes on to say, "Is it really necessary for individuals to give up their right to privacy in order to take advantage of the remission program?"

And in a second letter, she says, "There is nothing that I can find in the act which requires that the names of those students involved need to be included in the public accounts report."

That is coming from the Privacy Commissioner herself, who happens to be a lawyer, but this is just bad practice in terms of certainly in no way does it encourage our students to seek loan remissions, and I think, really, there is a perception that they are categorized in the same grouping of bad debts and write-offs and forgiveness. That is clearly not what this is about, and there is no legal requirement for this. I really want to encourage the Minister of Finance to stop this practice.

So that's what this is aimed at. The next recommendation is also aimed at this matter, but we have to stop this. This does not encourage our students to seek student loan remissions, and I have said this is an unfair invasion of their privacy and it needs to stop. Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. To the motion. Order. Order.

---Laughter

Now that order has been restored, would the House like the question put to it?

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 70-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Reporting of Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Chair. I move that this Assembly recommend to the Department of Finance, upon completion of a privacy impact assessment in 2018-2019 by the Information and Privacy Commissioner, and having considered the committee's suggestions contained in this report, reconsider amending the non-consolidated schedule of bad debt write-offs, forgiveness, and student loan remissions to better protect the privacy of individuals. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. To the motion. Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, and I'd like to thank the honourable Member for Frame Lake for really championing this issue of student loan remissions in the public accounts. The standing committee, of course, shares these concerns, and in addition to the previous motion that has just been carried, this further recommends that a privacy assessment be taken up and that, perhaps based on that assessment, the whole issue of student loan remissions be reconsidered. So rather than just moving them to a separate schedule, this recommendation is more about removing them altogether as individuals named in the public accounts. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. To the motion. Mr. O'Reilly.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kevin O'Reilly Frame Lake

Yes, Mr. Chair. I had forgotten about one other point I wanted to make. In our review of public accounts, we found that, in previous years, there was some disclosure of bad debt write-offs that were just sort of a consolidated amount. There was no individual listing of where those bad debts came from. That occurred in more than one of the public accounts over the last eight or 10 years. So if we can do that for bad debt, why can't we do that for student loan remissions? Just have a single figure. There is no need to disclose individual names and amounts.

I am encouraging the Minister of Finance to work with his staff to use the same method that is currently used for bad debts for student loan remissions. If you can't list who the bad debts are from, you shouldn't be listing the students individually, as well. I want to encourage the Minister of Finance to stop that invasion of privacy. By the way, it's not done in any other jurisdiction in Canada, except for Nunavut, and that's just an artefact of division. So stop that practice, please. Thanks, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. O'Reilly. To the motion.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 71-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Protection of Privacy in Non-Consolidated Schedule of Bad Debts, Write-offs and Student Loan Remissions, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 72-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - French Translation of Annual Reports Required Under GNWT Planning and Accountability Framework, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Mr. Chair, I move that this Assembly recommend that the Department of Finance continue its efforts to ensure that all annual reports required under the GNWT's planning and accountability framework be translated into French and made available to the public in a timely manner. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 72-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - French Translation of Annual Reports Required Under GNWT Planning and Accountability Framework, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. To the motion.

Committee Motion 72-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - French Translation of Annual Reports Required Under GNWT Planning and Accountability Framework, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 72-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - French Translation of Annual Reports Required Under GNWT Planning and Accountability Framework, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

Mr. Testart.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Merci, Monsieur le President. I move that this Assembly recommend that the Government of the Northwest Territories provide a response to this report within 120 days. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Testart. There is a motion on the floor. To the motion.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Question has been called. All those in favour? All those opposed? Let the record show that there was one Member who opposed. The motion is carried.

---Carried

Does committee agree that this concludes our consideration of Committee Report 8-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Account of the Government of the Northwest Territories?

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Agreed.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, committee. What is the wish of committee now, Mr. Beaulieu?

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

Tom Beaulieu Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh

Thank you, Mr. Chairman. Mr. Chairman, I move that the Chair rise and report progress. Thank you, Mr. Chair.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Chair R.J. Simpson

Thank you, Mr. Beaulieu. There is a motion on the floor to report progress. All those in favour? All those opposed? The motion is carried.

---Carried

I will rise and report progress, but first, it's been a long week here. I think this might be the longest week we've had in this House, and so I really have to thank everyone who was involved to make it happen, the translators, all the Pages, everyone in the back, for sticking around and helping us through some very long nights while we did some very important work. So thank you to everyone.

Committee Motion 73-18(3): Committee Report 8-18(3): Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories - Comprehensive Response to Report within 120 Days, Carried
Consideration In Committee Of The Whole Of Bills And Other Matters

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

May I have the report, Member for Hay River North?

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4183

R.J. Simpson Hay River North

Mr. Speaker, your committee has been considering Minister's Statement 1-18(3), North Slave Correctional Complex Inmate Concerns; Committee Report 8-18(3), Standing Committee on Government Operations Report on the Review of the 2016-2017 Public Accounts of the Government of the Northwest Territories, and would like to report progress, with eight motions being adopted, and that consideration of Minister's Statement 1-18(3) and Committee Report 8-18(3) are concluded. Mr. Speaker, I move that the report of the Committee of the Whole be concurred with.

Report Of Committee Of The Whole
Report Of Committee Of The Whole

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. Do I have a seconder? Member for Deh Cho. The motion is in order. All those in favour? All those opposed?

---Carried

Masi. Item 22, third reading of bills. Minister of Justice.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Louis Sebert Thebacha

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 6, Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, be read for the third time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The motion is in order. To the motion. Member for Kam Lake.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Kieron Testart Kam Lake

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I would like to request a recorded vote. Thank you.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

To the motion.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 6: Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. The Member requested a recorded vote. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

The Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Well done. Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Third reading of bills. Minister of Finance.

Bill 19: An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Robert C. McLeod Inuvik Twin Lakes

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Hay River South, that Bill 19, An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, be read for the third time. Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and I would request a recorded vote.

Bill 19: An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 19: An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 19: An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Committee Clerk Of The House Ms. Franki-Smith

The Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, the Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Third reading of bills. Minister of Industry, Tourism and Investment.

Bill 21: An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Wally Schumann Hay River South

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by the honourable Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes, that Bill 21, An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act, be read for the third time. Mr. Speaker, I request a recorded vote. Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

Bill 21: An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. The Member has requested a recorded vote. The motion is in order. To the motion.

Bill 21: An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Some Hon. Members

Question.

Bill 21: An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act, Carried
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Question has been called. All those in favour, please stand.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

Page 4183

Deputy Clerk Of The House Ms. Kay

The Member for Hay River South, the Member for Thebacha, the Member for Hay River North, the Member for Mackenzie Delta, the Member for Sahtu, the Member for Yellowknife North, the Member for Kam Lake, the Member for Tu Nedhe-Wiilideh, the Member for Nahendeh, the Member for Frame Lake, the Member for Yellowknife Centre, the Member for Deh Cho, the Member for Nunakput, the Member for Inuvik Boot Lake, the Member for Range Lake, the Member for Great Slave, the Member for Inuvik Twin Lakes.

Recorded Vote
Third Reading Of Bills

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi. All those opposed, please stand. All those abstaining, please stand.

The results of the recorded vote: 17 in favour, zero opposed, zero abstentions.

---Carried

Third reading of bills. Mr. Clerk, will you ascertain if the Commissioner, Margaret Thom, is ready to enter the Chamber to assent to bills.

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

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Commissioner Ms. Thom

Mr. Speaker and Members of the Legislative Assembly, good afternoon. [English translation not provided.]

Thank you. I am honoured to be in this special place with all of you. It is great to see all of you and to thank you for your hard work to better the lives of the Northerners.

With deep respect, I would like to acknowledge and honour the sacred land and traditional territory of Chief Drygeese and to be forever grateful for allowing us to do our work in this territory.

As we enjoy these warmer months, I would like to wish each of you a safe, healthy, and happy summer as you take your break and enjoy quality time with your families. Please travel safely on the land, on our waters, in the air, and on our highways as you continue working for the betterment of all Northerners.

Encourage and remind your families, friends, and people in your communities to be safe out on the land and to wear personal flotation devices, or PFDs, when travelling by boat on our waterways.

As this sitting comes to a close, I wish the Members of this House good health and happiness as you enjoy the summer and continue your work in your constituencies. Now, as Commissioner of the Northwest Territories, I am pleased to assent to the following bills:

  • Bill 5, An Act to Amend the Summary Conviction Procedures Act
  • Bill 6, Cannabis Legalization and Regulation Implementation Act
  • Bill 19, An Act to Amend the Revolving Funds Act
  • Bill 22, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Infrastructure Expenditures), No. 2, 2018-2019
  • Bill 23, Supplementary Appropriation Act (Operations Expenditures), No. 2, 2018-2019
  • Bill 21, An Act to Amend the Northwest Territories Business Development and Investment Corporation Act

Mahsi Cho. Thank you. Quyanainni. Merci Beaucoup. Koana.

Assent To Bills
Assent To Bills

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Please be seated. Members, [English translation not provided].

Colleagues, I would like to extend the appreciation of this House to the Commissioner, Margaret M. Thom. It was a pleasure to have you in the House here today.

I would also like to take this opportunity to thank all of the Pages throughout the past week and a half who have served during this session. Our youth are our future, we have always stated that, our greatest resources. It is an honour to share this Chamber with you, all of you.

Finally, I would like to thank all the interpreters who have been with us throughout this session. Some days were long, but they were here with us: Mary Rose Sundberg, Sarah Cleary, Tom Unka, and Annie Goose. Our official languages are an important part of our heritage, our culture, and our identity. The hard work and dedication of interpreters make it possible for us to share, use, and celebrate our official languages on a daily basis during our session. To our interpreters, thank you all for the invaluable services that you provide each and every day. Masi cho for that.

Colleagues, this was a short sitting, but it was not an easy one. During the past two weeks, you have achieved a great deal, and you should feel proud of the week you have done to do so. The topics we have considered have been very challenging. The days have been long. We have not always been able to see eye-to-eye.

Although we did not always agree, we were able to work together with honour and dignity as we worked to serve our constituencies, the Northwest Territories, and the people across the board. I commend all Members of this House for their dedication and hard work. I would also like to wish you safe travels as you return to your constituencies. Masi, colleagues.

As we prepare for another beautiful northern summer, I'd like to remind you to get out and experience all that this territory has to offer. We are fortunate to live in one of the most beautiful regions of the country and we should not take that for granted at all. Whether you are out on the land, on the water, visiting one of our parks, or enjoying one of our summer festivals or summer assemblies, please do so safely and enjoy what this territory has to offer.

Colleagues, this House, as you know, will not sit again until October. However, I know that all of you will be busy with your constituencies, with committee work, and the ongoing business of this government. Also, there are a great deal of commitments that have been made by this government. Most importantly, spend time with your family, with your friends, with your community members, with your constituencies.

Our profession often requires us to work long hours, as we witnessed yesterday and the days before, and spend days and weeks away from the people who matter most to all of us. Please enjoy the summer recess, and make time for those who give so much so we can serve those who have elected us. With that in mind, I would just like to say masi for your invaluable contribution.

Mr. Clerk, item 23, orders of the day.

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

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Clerk Of The House Mr. Tim Mercer

Orders of the day for Thursday, October 11, 2018, at 1:30 p.m.:

  1. Prayer
  2. Ministers' Statements
  3. Members' Statements
  4. Returns to Oral Questions
  5. Recognition of Visitors in the Gallery
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Oral Questions
  8. Written Questions
  9. Returns to Written Questions
  10. Replies to the Commissioner's Opening Address
  11. Petitions
  12. Reports of Standing and Special Committees
  13. Reports of Committees on the Review of Bills
  14. Tabling of Documents
  15. Notices of Motion
  16. Notices of Motion for First Reading of Bills
  17. Motions
  18. First Reading of Bills
  19. Second Reading of Bills
  20. Consideration in Committee of the Whole of Bills and Other Matters
  • Minister's Statement 19-18(3), Aurora College Foundational Review Process
  1. Report of Committee of the Whole
  2. Third Reading of Bills
  3. Orders of the Day

Orders Of The Day
Orders Of The Day

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The Speaker Jackson Lafferty

Masi, Mr. Clerk. This House stands adjourned until Thursday, October 11, 2018, at 1:30 p.m.

---ADJOURNMENT

The House adjourned at 12:53 p.m.